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Some UX test reports for early Bell concepts


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The querant has asked the wrong question. When the automatic telephone switching system was developed, electronics was mostly electromechanical -- relays and switches and capacitors, gears and springs and solenoids. The dial mechanism wound a spring, and in returning to its resting position a set of gears and a cam repeatedly opened and closed a switch, ...


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In pulse-train driven "addressing" systems (to avoid the use of the word "dialing"), there is a specific timing window for recognizing a string of pulses as a specific number - there is a minimum amount of time between pulses that can be recognized by an electro-mechanical switching system, and a maximum time between pulses that signal the end of one number ...


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The main reason was that it replaced hand crank telephones, and thus was a familiar interface. In the hand crank phone system, several houses were connected on one line, and each house was assigned a different ring pattern. For instance you might have been assigned one short ring, then a long ring. Your phone had a hand crank, a bell, a mouthpiece and a ...


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The reason was that the telephone system required pulses to represent the numbers, and the technology did not exist at the time to generate pulses from pushbutton presses in a simple consumer device such as a telephone. The first automated telephone exchanges used electromechanical Strowger stepping switches that advanced one position for each pulse ...


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Going back to UX and quetzalcoatl's discussion above (I've not been here long enough to comment), in those days you pressed to do a binary option (on/off) and rotated to select from a range of options. Washing machines still do, but then you also selected you TV station by rotation, ditto oven temperatures, radio stations, things that pressed your name into ...


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I don't have evidence for this, but I think it is an example of end-end system design between the selectors in the exchange, the handset and the user. To route through one selector you need to connect and disconnect the battery a specific number of times, giving time between each 'pulse' for the selector to move into position. So you need something that ...


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I was going to post this a comment, but bits of it applied to each of the existing answers, so here it is in one place: There were a few push-button pulse-dial phones around (though wikipedia could do with a reference), and even more which had a switch to select pulse/tone (in fact every non-cordless landline phone I've owned. The real reason hinted at ...


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One factor driving the switch over to buttons rather than a rotary dial was the increasing length of telephone numbers, as they grew to accommodate more telephone numbers being used. Having to dial lots of numbers on a rotary dial is very tedious ! As to the question of why rotary dials hung on for so long; in the UK, the switch over to being able to ...


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The most important part is, that at the time of invention of telephones, there was no such thing as automated call routing. There were people sitting in the central stations, and you spoke to them and asked "connect me to Mrs. Johnson" and they replugged the wires, and here you go, now you're connected to her. Later, automated call routing was invented, but ...


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After watching the video, I have some doubts about the veracity of their reactions, at least for some of them, but leaving that aside, I think the main problem now is that button interfaces are very common, almost anything is now a button, so the first reaction is to press something. Phones, remote controls, interfaces on computers and tablets, microwaves, ...


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The reason for the design was because of the technology at the time. Rotary Dial (Pulse dialing) To dial a number, the user puts a finger in the corresponding finger hole and rotates the dial clockwise until it reaches the finger stop. The user then pulls out the finger, and a spring in the dial returns it to the resting position. For example, if ...


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Most “blind” people can see a bit. Assuming that the sign is large and has a contrasting colour to the door, then a lot of blind people will at least be able to “see” that there is something on the door. Once a blind person has learned their way round a building they know where to expect the signs to be, so for example if someone is trying to find a room ...


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I believe its because there are universally defined standards on where Braille letters have to positioned with regards to a informational item and braille users generally learn to look for them in one location. There are also classes conducted for people with visual disabilities which inform them where to look for the sign (the class is called Orientation ...


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As near as I can tell from my sighted perspective, they feel around till they find what they are after. Look at some of the videos from Tommy Edison (the link goes to his ATM video). Basically, it appears to really suck to try to find the Braille in many situations. I suspect that if you could figure out a good way to fix this part of the problem, you'd ...


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I think understanding book jackets can be done with some quick marketing analysis. Reasons for it: It's a cheap way to put a book in a bright colorful wrapper, to grab consumers' attention when on the bookstore shelves (or to deliver what was promised if bought online). It serves to advertise the book when carried around by a reader. It provides the book ...



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