New answers tagged

2

As a starting point for you I can help answer the following part of your question: I am curious as to whether there have been studies of elevator dispatch algorithms combined with human behaviour to optimize such systems According to Cortés, Larrañeta and Onieva (of Seville University), researching elevator systems is only a fairly recent phenomenon: ...


0

I'm coming from a Central Asian nomadic culture (Kazakh), north of China. We share many components of nomadic culture, including the pottery. Rounded cups have been known in the region since second half of 1000 BC. Our cups are called kese [keseh]. The ergonomic factors of kese are exhaustively defined by the nomadic tradition. One, the shape has to ...


0

I once asked this question at a sushi restaurant and the answer was, if it's too hot for your finger then it's too hot for your lips.


1

In some elevator lobbies, I've noticed where 1 lift will only service odd number floor and one will only handle the even numbers for instance. i believe this would optimize time taken and efficiency in the elevators. Another way to approach this is by numbers. have some kind of tracking set-up to record the frequency of which floors were serviced per ...


3

It sounds like there is more to the story than meets the eye, so I'll try to tackle it from a number of different perspectives: Firstly, it would appear that you have created some bias through the purchasing of the cheapest devices. No doubt that cost impacts on the amount of functions and features (memory being one of them) that can be shipped with the ...


4

To keep costs down I would rephrase the question as 'Why do manufacturers sell devices with seemingly insufficient memory?'. The answer is to make the device more affordable, particularly in developing markets where consumers are very price sensitive and may have lower disposable incomes. App bundling The other secondary affect to this to consider is ...


5

Remove seats in the front area The area between the doors is often occupied by people standing, while the seats in the back are empty. Obviously, people gain more from standing there than from sitting in the back. If this is a city bus, with short distances between stops, people might value ease of getting off the bus above sitting. When going from a ...


1

This is a common situation for bus drivers and passengers in Australia as well (hard to believe since our population size and density is nowhere near what it is compared to other cities). I have often thought that sacrificing some of the advertising space positioned at the eyeline (and above, which is where people look at to avoid looking directly at someone ...


4

This almost-locked state is certainly not user friendly when you're not driving. However, when you're in an accident that causes the car to flip over a couple of times, it may cause the first door lock state to fail. If there was no second lock state, you would fall out of the car while it's spinning. In short: the semi-closed state is a backup safety ...


0

My Honda Insight beeps when you leave the car lights on. Which helps, but man, so much beeping in the world today, its practically background noise. Like thousands of other people yesterday, I left the lights on and needed a jump in the morning. Baffled at how a car that can stop and start the engine at a stop sign, can't detect the combination of ...


1

I will add one additional item that the other answers have not hit on is that Blackberry has a multitude of patents covering physical keyboards making it extremely difficult to not infringe on their IP. Here are some examples- Hand-held electronic device with a keyboard optimized for use with the thumbs Ramped-key keyboard for a handheld mobile ...


6

It gives the car more symmetry which has aesthetical, structural and usability benefits. Aside from the symmetry there are some other benefits too. Aesthetical: Humans like symmetry, it's that simple. With a top-swing you can put one hinge left, one right, and the handle in the middle. And when opened the (a)symmetry is even more noticeable. Usability: ...


4

It is simply more convenient to open upward as opposed of outward, it can pose as a physical barrier preventing loading from the side and can be impeded from fully opening. Which small SUVs have a back door that opens to the side? There are a few design characteristics that, in our opinion, make a swing-gate less desirable than the liftgate alternative, ...


1

Originally, trunks on cars were exactly that: wooden trunks strapped onto the back of the car. The pattern seems to have stuck to a great extent simply because there don't appear to be any advantages to changing it. There are some variations: A few supercars where the trunk is at the front of the car and, although still opening upwards, hinges at the ...


2

Why limit the side of the car or the angle at which you can place something in the trunk? You are never going to be on top of the car but you might be on either side/ behind the car reaching into the trunk. My opinion was clearly the car manufacturer that made the sideways trunk was trying to be different or gimmicky and now the user only has 2 directions @ ...


44

While space is an obvious part of the equation, it's not the main one, you could simply have a sliding physical keyboard just as previous generations of smartphones and be a happy camper. However, physical keyboards had several issues: smaller keys than on-screen keys structural weakness short lifetime (the flex connector and pieces of sliding keyboards ...


2

The reason why apple specifically veered away from a physical keyboard was because of this question: "If I don't want a keyboard, why do I need to have one present?" This truly speaks to the idea that simplicity is key. A use case: I'm watching a video - I don't need a keyboard, infact, I need more screen space. But when it does come down to writing ...


0

I think it's because of the way we use our rectangles. Although not sure, I would be willing to bet that most of the time we are not typing on our devices. By not having a dedicated physical keyboard, we can repurpose different parts of the screen depending on the context of use at any given moment. This would also reduce points of failure on a device, ...


9

A keyboard has obvious costs: Increased device size. Reduced space for a screen. Mechanical complexity/manufacturing costs. The need to localize the keyboard to different languages. On the other hand, the main benefit of a keyboard was easier data entry. At one point, a keyboard was worth it despite the costs, for this reason, because touch screens were ...


33

What caused this decline in the use of physical keyboards? The iPhone What is the impact on the UX of mobile devices? This is a pretty deep question and is tough to answer objectively. I would argue that dropping the physical keyboard was a net gain. That the benefits it brought far outweighed the usefulness of the physical keyboard. As others have ...


4

This is actually a really good example of Darwinian evolution in action: The natural analog might be something like a flight-capable wing on an ostrich: The natural habitat for ostriches favours running for a bird of that size. A large wing would only cause drag and use energy and nutrients that would be better spent on powerful legs - many thousands of ...


2

In the past people used to use cellphones mainly to talk and text only, nowadays people doesn't use smartphones JUST for that, so you don't need to use the keyboard all the time but just on demand which allows to place a bigger screen to offer an overall better experience without losing any functionality. It's a cost benefit adaptation, you can emulate a ...


23

The main reason is versatility. A keyboard in software can be easily adapted to different layouts, different character/symbol sets and different cultures. In addition, custom keyboards such as Swype or Word Flow are then feasible. Physical keyboards add to the physical complexity of the device, have to be revealed (deployed) to be usable and are more ...


5

Most probably because of 2 trends in the smartphone industry. Phones get thinner and thinner, and losing a physical keyboard makes a phone a lot less thick. Screens on phones kept getting bigger, and started using touchscreen. The combination of these gave to option to type on your screen by tabbing a "digital" keyboard. The downside to this though, is ...


5

I suspect this is partly function of utilitarian materials choice, as well as customer choice. Customers have certainly pulled car colour choices down to a narrow range of gloss or metallic colours. Cars are painted metal surfaces that are required to withstand weathering, power-washing, minor abrasions and so on. However, they're not usually handled. The ...


2

Perhaps because cars were primarily designed to sit within & not to look at from outside and at close quarters. If they dazzled another car user on the road, well that was collateral damage. (Even in cars the internal trim is unpainted & matte not glossy.A car with glossily painted interiors would be crazy distracting to travel in I expect) Devices ...


2

I believe one reason might be that shiny surface will reflect the light, making it hard for the user to see the screen. while a dull finish like matte won't reflect the light so much. In terms of taste and trends, i think the mobile phone industry has gone past the 'shiny and new' trend towards a giving phones a sturdy feel.


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Practical origins defined our tastes When car finishes became shiny (because they weren't always) [1,2] due to the availability of the required technology and paint materials, it was mostly for practical purposes - cost effectiveness, weather resistance, rain run-off, aerodynamics, ease of cleaning. Consumers found the attention-grabbing gleam of a shiny ...



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