Tag Info

New answers tagged

3

As stated earlier, I think the title of your question is incorrect. Most citations referring to knobs offering an affordance of rotation are typically referring to knobs other than the ones on doors. Such as the ones on a radio tuner...which tend to have a lot more physical (and visual) cues as to how to interact with it (knurled 'grippy' edge, a tick mark ...


10

“Affordance” is one of those terms that has come to be used for so many different things that I’ve recently just about given up using it in order to avoid confusion. Affordance as possible physical interactions In the original definition put forth by Donald Norman (1988) in The Design of Everyday Things: The term affordance refers to the perceived ...


1

They sometime don't afford twisting very well Your observation is a good and nuanced one. Door handles are used frequently as cases in design texts because they can represent: A ubiquitous interface A complex, compound interaction (the knob must be twisted in one or another direction, and then the door pulled, pushed, or slid) Therefore, twistable ...


-1

The best way to solve is is to have the machine make fast repeated but at a lower tone of beeps while the card is being read, and then make a high pitched beep when finished.


6

This is a common UX situation Most users 'self police' and do not need warnings or guidance. You have few heavy users who need to be [gently warned/dissuaded] to avoid waste or abuse. You have isolated cases of abusive users. This heavily skewed distribution of users is very common in lot of applications (cell phone usage, all you can eat buffets, ...


0

In Britain, at least, there are architectural/plumbing issues in the past that we had to deal with. This guy explains it better than I could: https://youtu.be/HfHgUu_8KgA


0

I use a system simular to that. They have a red background with a hand held up while processing, and then a green background with a circled white check mark in it when it is finished.


1

We used to have the same problem in my office. (Although we have 2 separate recycling bins and 1 garbage bin) There was only 2 post-it notes above the bins but no one bothered to pay attention. Now we added a much better sign and I think it helps because it tells everyone exactly what goes in each bin. For example, it say "No soiled paper" in the paper ...


0

I have seen a few examples of behavioural modification that make use of the 'norm' - for example: you could try putting up a poster that says something like "98.5% of people sort their trash correctly" Alternatively, you could (and I hate this word) 'Gameify' it by posting some stats for correct recycling bin contents like: "last week we sent 2 bags of ...


1

As users are likely not used to technology working this slowly, the best system may be one that uses a combination of methods to help guide them to using the system correctly. However, (as other answers have shown) it's difficult to convey "waiting" through a static visual aid alone, and it may be too costly to add a screen conveying proper use. I think ...


23

This is where I'd argue that UX isn't the one to fix this. All they can do is apply duct tape and band aids to a poorly implemented technology. Fix the technology. It simply shouldn't take 3 seconds to read an RFID chip. On top of that, asking each person to wait 3 seconds to pass through seems like a logistical nightmare for crowd management. This is ...


0

One system that is used in the city I live in: The reading apparatus is different between single beeps (check-in before entering the metro) and long reads (e.g. buying subscriptions). On the machines where the cards are read for a long time, the card is meant to be inserted in a sort of vertical slot, where the reader is, so it's I think evident for the user ...


80

Great question! This is an good case for microinteraction design. Microinteraction objectives In descending order of priority: Provide clear affordance for user to place card/wallet on reader Provide clear feedback that the user should hold the card on the reader until an outcome. Since this is public transportation, provide blind- and deaf- friendly ...


7

Adding to Alexey's great answer: You could have the reader play a sequence of tones in a scale that move toward a resolution; when the card is done reading, a resolving chord would play. This would make it even clearer that the reader is done, eliminating any doubt as to whether the sequence of notes is finished. I believe this could be done in such a way ...


11

The XBox added a visual camera input device called the Kinect. They defined a number of gesture inputs, covered on the linked page and this one. This 2nd link includes the 'hold to select' gesture. Point the palm of your hand toward the screen, and move the on-screen hand over the item you want to select. To select an item, keep your hand over the item ...


4

Audio only feedback - Play a rising tone that ends in a pleasant note when finished. Initially users would not know what the tone meant but once they use it the first time they will be trained. Or play a slightly annoying sound that ends once the card is read. Think like the scratchy changing sound of the geiger counter. Visual feedback - A single yellow ...


18

In the Parliament of Ukraine they use both visual and audial means while voting, you can see youtube video (~10s). The sound consist of several tones which are percieved as the sequence, so stopping it somewhere in the middle sounds not natural. The row has some kind of harmony and natural feeling of the length. You could try to play some ~3s sound when ...


7

You can start looking at existing systems in the public sector. Take for example pedestrian-crossing lights with a ticking sound for visually impaired people. It's a continuously ticking sound and it ticks fast enough to notice something is in progress. It can be a softer, shorter and different sound than the beep. For those who can't hear it can be combined ...


0

I think a good way to engage and motivate people is to give them some kind of incentive to recycle. Maybe add a sign that says "it's been X days since we successfully recycled" and whenever trash ends up in the recycling the number goes back down to 0. Or maybe see if it's possible to add an official office rule that recycling is mandatory. Here in NYC ...


1

At work we have two identical white bins right next to one another. The only difference is one uses a black colored bin bag and the other a clear bag. Clear bag is associated with recycling by convention, so we've never had any issues of anyone making a mistake. We also have recycling symbols dotted around to make people aware that we do indeed recycle. ...


0

Another reason to place the switch outside the bathroom is that it can act as an indicator that someone is in the room.


1

Here in Norway the switch is usually inside the room, just next to the door. Except maybe in a bathroom where it's usually on the outside (a toilet without shower, will probably have the lights on the inside). We don't really notice much where the switch are though, since we usually leave the most lights on all the time. That's probably because in the ...


2

Make milestones. Once a certain amount of recycling is done, everyone at the office gets a beer. Anything on those lines should or might help a bit.


0

This is all about human psychology. "if people like something they also like to see its growth"-like a plant . so we need to add some gamification to the recycle bin and then your staff actually start liking it(ya start like your recycle bin ) . my solution is just train your staff minds with some new things every day . they have to eagerly wait to see and ...


5

A different approach perhaps: make users of the bins 'agree' to what they are putting inside them. Imagine the below is the lid of the bin, with the OK 'button' being the handle to open the bin. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


0

Why? Because of all sorts of reasons outside of UX. But I'd ask the reverse...why would you have both a temperature and quantity option? When showering, there usually isn't a gradient of amount. It's either on or off. No real need for a spectrum there. As for temp, temp is created by adjusting the individual amount of cold and hot. In otherwords, the ...


16

Place empty cans and bottles on a table instead There is only one way to stop all people from putting trash in a recycle bin and that is by not having a recycle bin. This might mean more recyclable items go in the trash but I think most people will learn the system with a few cans and bottles on a table close by with a sign that says, "Please put empty ...


0

Identify and care are separate. The standard symbol for recycle is And the standard color is green. As for care need to educate people on the value of recycle. Meeting, flyer, one on one? If you can just get a few advocates that will speak out when someone uses recycle for trash hopefully a recycle culture will build. Especially if you can get some ...


2

The ideal UX solution is that you handle the recycling separation on the back end. For your particular problem: They are simply two bins, with the same color ...start my differentiating them by color... that are hidden in a cabinet. ...and consider not hiding them in a cabinet. Outside of the cabinet are two doors, one door saying ...


1

I think this is a fundamental problem with Recycle Bins, as long as you put them near to Trash Bins, people are going to throw trash inside them. That's because recycle bins are always associated with trash bins, we haven't been able to successfully separate the two in people's minds so far. I think the only solution would be to put the Recycle Bin in a ...


6

I think an aspect that hasn't been discussed are social dynamics, particularly, how can we use social indicators to incentivize behavioral change. A nice parallel is how hotels have nudged people to reuse towels. Simply stating that by reusing one's towel is better for the environment had a nominal effect. What had a larger impact was stating that X% of ...


2

This is more than a reading issue. You are trying to change people's behavior. This break room recycling can - is it for bottles (plastic/glass) only? Do you have other bins for paper elsewhere? Changing the shape of the access hole to the can might get people to stop and think - especially if the hole is inconveniently small for regular refuse, but works ...


2

Opening Hmmm interesting UX question. I usually assume UX will be about websites... but this is completely valid, too! Color Code It You guys had it right when you were color coding things. My suggestion would be to make the trash can red. Of course, red means "stop" or "danger" to us so you'll [hopefully] find that people will hesitate before using the ...


1

Do people understand what is considered trash and then what gets recycled? I swear every place is different in what it recycles (glass? plastic? paper? compost? glass without labels? etc.) I would first make sure there were instructions on what needed to be recycled - then I would mark the recycled can in green or blue.


1

I would try taking off the door from the trash cabinet but not the recycle bin cabinet door, making it less steps it will take them to throw the trash. You could also just change the position of your trash and recycle bins. Seems like you have more traffic direction on the recycle bin side.


2

A typical passenger elevator's doors, even when opened, must fit in the elevator shaft. Unless each side of the door is split into multiple sections, that means that the doors can be at most half the width of the car. If the doors are split in half, that allows a width up to 2/3 of the car width. If they're split in thirds, that allows a width up to 3/4 ...


10

They don't any more. They used to because it is the most mechanically simple implementation of temperature control. However, this is only historical. None of the other answers mention the legalities of this. The International Building Code (what most US local codes are modeled on these days) mandates that all new shower controls must be temperature ...


-1

It is funny that there are so many answers to this question without getting one that has to do with the actual function of a shower valve. Let's go over the 3 examples that we have as examples already: 1. This shower system has electronic mechanisms to calibrate the temperature and flow. The pros include easy user interface, looks cool (maybe because ...


1

You are the one who is running in your business circle. Think about all the times you've accepted a business card. What did you do with it? What did you like about it? Match those expectations. In the US we use business cards almost like personalized stationery sometimes. If someone hands you a card and says "call me on Tues" you write call Bob on Tues. on ...


3

It really depends so much on you – what you want your business cards look like / feel like – it's your business card and ideally it should speak for you, represent you, your ideas, your style. Just two thoughts on those two 'recommendations' you quoted: You're working digital? Feel free to put a QR code on your card! Other people find QR codes on business ...


1

In Australia, most showers have separate hot and cold knobs, and the more modern remainder are 'mixing batteries' like what tillinberlin describes. There are some big UX problems with hot/cold taps: When turning on the shower it takes time to adjust the taps to get the right temperature and pressure. People must be taught to turn on the cold tap first and ...


-1

I see no point to assume it's based on intuition in any way. For that claim, I see several (possibly subjective?) reasons: Both loosening and tightening can be very hard and require a great deal of strength on some objects. Neither loosening nor tightening can be generally assumed to be the "default" or "more frequent" case: Many objects need to be ...


1

In my experience, it's just social norm. I work with many students in our labs who always turn cylinder valves and other knobs randomly. If they don't know from experience, they almost never have any confidence in the correct way, so that hints to me that it's something that's pervasively taught rather than intuitive.


1

In terms of it being an intuition, I have taught this to a couple of children who were helping me with things including, recently, my own child. In both cases they needed to be taught, had no preconceptions, but soon got the idea and also readily generalised it. There was no underlying spooky intuition, but it was quickly understood. So my, -- probably ...


0

It's convention, just as the thread size & pitch are conventions*. You do find reverse threads in some applications: turnbuckles, the left pedal on bicycles, some gas fittings, &c. *In the same way that you have coarse & fine thread nuts & bolts in the US, and metric sizes that are compatible with neither. And if you've ever worked on ...


3

Assumptions to be tested: It appears as if 90% of people are right-handed. It's easier for people to use their dominant hand while doing tasks such as tightening a screw. Our arms are constructed so as there is more power in a clockwise turn. In a muscle powered age this difference would have been noticed very quickly. So, at first blush it seems that ...


3

I found it very amusing reading all these answers which I assume were written by people in the US. I live in the UK and visit France and Spain very regularly. I believe a resident of any of these countries would be appalled to find a hot/cold shower in a hotel room in Europe - I have not seen such a thing for many years. All the talk about the the ...


0

This question assumes that “temperature” and “quantity” knobs are easier to use. And yes, those types of controls are easier to use for me at least, but for my elderly mother, those types of controls have never been easy to use. My mother could never tell which knob was for pressure and which knob was for the temperature. Part of the problem I think is ...


2

Some systems in South America (called "calefón" in my country) require certain level of pressure to get the hot water running (for example, you can turn the knob 30º without the "calefon" getting activated in order change the water temperature), so in that case it's a device limitation.


17

I can honestly say I have never seen a shower that has separate hot/cold knobs like you describe, and I've lived everywhere up and down both the east and west US coast. Every shower I've ever seen has two concentric wheels. The inner one controls temperature while the outer one controls pressure. Here's what they look like (although the labels around the ...



Top 50 recent answers are included