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0

Very interesting question. I never cam across a study around sound in home appliances. I wonder how much of this is linked to idea of "affordance" or universality. I would suggest looking at Google Scholar. Finally I can easily see a future perhaps not so far away from now where technology will become more performing, reducing the noise of home appliances. ...


0

There are some vaguely related ISO standards on warning sounds: Unfortunately they cost money to look at so I can't tell you how relevant they are.


1

There is some evidence that gamification has been used to improve human behavior during urinal use, as shown by the increasing use of flies and other "targets". Perhaps including a gamification element just for the underused urinals can increase use?


0

I realize this answer can come across as sarcastic, but hear me out. I think the cleanliness of floors around the middle urinal is the proof you seek. The walls on either side are the "privacy screens" you speak of. Nobody will be next to you there, and it's obvious that people prefer those, judging by the evidence you mentioned yourself!


1

Just my two cents but I would bet that the answer is completely situational due to the fact that there are varying anatomical structures amongst humans (gasp!) Certain shapes and sizes are better suited for certain butts, period. Wide hips, big butts, flat butts, narrows butts, etc... If you are finding a trend for elongated-extended in your area then ...


1

Tom Wolf in his book The Right Stuff suggests that the Technospeak and the calm measured tone of the pilot has a psychological function for worried passengers. It's kind of suggesting Don't Worry; We are professionals and have LOTS OF TECHNOLOGY; So everything will be alright The medical profession tends to adopt the same approach.


3

In this I think they should cater the majority I'm sure, most people want short layman info they can easily understand But the pilot could sneak in a short tech line just for fun and curious/interested people Some pilots actually do that already, but not much more techy than "We are know flying in a speed of 995kmph heading 10 degrees east for Lissabon" ...


1

Best thing to do is a small survey for passengers if they really want more technical details. Most passengers would expect updates which can be understood for any lay man. More technical info is unnecessary I believe. 1) how technical should airline pilots be? As least as possible. 2) Should they only give basic essential information or should ...


0

The cord on headphones is usually on the left, so it makes sense for the mic to be on the left too so that the mic's cable doesn't have to cross all the way over to the right side, thus reducing the wiring/complexity. That's my guess anyway. Why the cord is on the left, I don't know.


0

My thinking is along your theory #1. As some people have commented, the microphone can also be on the right side, which indicates to me that this isn't an absolute design standard. It seems to be more convenience based then. So what is convenient about it? As stated in your first theory, it frees up space, allowing for uninterrupted interaction with the ...


0

The colour and text concepts... priceless! I believe the visuals which show a lot of information regarding water level and toilet shape are too much. This is definitely somewhere you need to have simple and elegant design language. The button I see most often is akin to a Yin-yang symbol. One slightly smaller than the other. Getting across the amount of ...


3

There's a trend in the US to get rid of the handles and buttons completely. Sensors determine when the person has moved and auto flush. Sinks dispense water while hands are under the faucet and dryers auto turn on. Pretty much the only thing left in a bathroom to physically touch is the door on the way out. Which, ultimately, is why I prefer single ...


2

Acoustic sensor in the u-bend that detects the density of the deposit you have made using pulses of sound. Place a single button to trigger a flush. The on board computer can then detect a #1 or #2 and flush accordingly. Computer then charges battery using a water wheel. FLAWLESS. What could possibly go wrong?


1

Extension cords in the US have a ribbed side and a smooth side. This is to identify the hot wire in the circuit. This technology is already in place and is being used daily. It shouldn't be hard to modify the number of ribs to allow more than two options.


0

I prefer physically incompatibility. If all live wires were finished with a triangle, all neutral with a square, earth with a D etc. And all junction boxes, connectors etc appropriately shaped it would be extremely difficult to make a mistake. take putting petrol in a diesel car, with appropriately shaped nozzles and fillers this would be impossible. ...


2

After a good deal of thinking (partially inspired by PlasmaHH's comment) I came up a solution that would allow even the most visually impaired to identify wires. See this graphic: Using a combination of 2 wire colours, black and white (which are actually shades), plus 4 grey and opposite colour stripes, and a starting position indicator, a thin blue ...


5

Making a wiring system not depend on colour is easy. Making it cost effective is another question. The other answers have excellent ideas (bumps, labels etc) and they work fine in low-volume or custom installations like a datacenter, or ultra-high-cost products like commercial aircraft. Another way is to use a tracer. Telephone rooms have literally ...


1

You are not the only person to have this difficulty, but barring a new specification from the NEC board, it's not something you can solve for in general. Electric wiring is definitely not a one size fits all problem. In domain specific situations, manufacturers, such as automakers and HVAC vendors, need to provide their own solutions. Some do this better ...


6

Take the decision out of the hands of users. Have one button but make the toilet smart based on level of displacement, it wouldn't need an electronic sensor, just a better designed bulb in the reservoir right? Or possibly an extra pressure tube similar to how a barometer works? As the toilet is filled higher and with denser material the physical pressure of ...


30

The UK plug uses 3 wires -- two of solid colour, and a third that is 2-coloured in a stripe pattern. The colours are chosen so that each wire can be identified by colour blind persons. Here is what the configuration looks to people with colour blindness: From MrReid: Under the IEC 60446 standard only black, brown, red, orange, yellow, green, blue, ...


0

Wires could have little bumps at the end of them (for wires that have an end point like lan cables) or in regular intervals (like every 5cm). Then just map number of bumps to colors. So e.g. 1 bumps = red, 2 bumps = blue, etc. This would of course work best if some kind of standard was developed and ideally enforced by law. As this is not likely to happen, ...


3

First, consider that your description of the problem is incorrect: when you press the Bagel button, nothing happens. These buttons and knobs are options or modifiers, not actions. There is only one action control, and that is 'to toast' when you depress the lever. The toasting action is modified by your choices of options. This is neither an engineering ...


22

Color coding is one of the basic covenants of design and usability. To flaunt the significant benefits of color coding away purely on the varying needs of < 10% of the population would not be at all appropriate. There are multiple types of color blindness, so while one color might not work for some "color blind" people it will do just fine for the rest. ...


0

My vote for this Poll is no, color coding should not be outlawed. The reason for this is that although a user experience practitioners job is to seek out the most usable or accessible interface, product, or service, we are also required to try and meet user expectations. We have many different senses that designers can target as inputs or outupts for ...


9

This is most prevalent with hand-written numbers as some people draw their 1's like their 7's. The dash is used the differentiate the two from each other. With respect to this specific case, I assume it is for the same reason - because the number is along a curve the 7 could be interpreted as a 1, so the dash was added for clarity. I don't think I have ...


1

I find toilet buttons a huge design flaw because after nearly two decades of toilet usage I have to find out the truth from a question in User Experience. I always tried to find out why there are two buttons and what the size means. I thought one button empties all the tank and the other button flush water as long as I press it, because sometimes I really ...



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