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1

The issue with creating variables about how the product is used and then trying to fit / map your research data to these variables is that you may be skewing / projecting bias as to how you think a product is being used and not letting the research data "speak for itself". As you've collected all your research data (and I'm not sure how you've conducted your ...


1

Using fictive personas is also handy when you want to illustrate insights you gathered not only from user interviews but from different sources. Like quantitative surveys or ethnographic field studies. For exemple, if your research shows that 30% of your customers live outside of the US, you want your personas to represent that insight. Even if the users ...


2

As @Andy writes, you run the risk of invalidating your research (or worse) by not adhering to best practices re: confidentiality. The other problem I see is that your example real user may be too specific to represent very many people. Your, "lives alone, doesn't want to touch the heater" persona can be quite effective without the colorful details about ...


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I think this is primarily a question of ethics. Please note - I am not questioning your ethics by any means, these are just general thoughts on the ethical side of user research and persona creation. In conducting user research and interviews, we are responsible for keeping the users' identities confidential. Using the user data you have collected to create ...


3

Use both, but in order Personas are intended to provide a model for user behavior. This may include needs, emotions, perceptions, incentives, and goals. Personas are intended to help designers understand the problem domain before they start designing a solution. Understanding the problem domain before trying to design a solution is considered a basic ...


1

The question you are asking doesn't pertain to personas, it pertains to user flows. What the user currently does with existing tools is one set of user flows. What the user would do if using your product as intended is another set of user flows. The persona should be the same for both. Otherwise, as @tonytrucco mentions, you are not inventing a product ...


2

So personas are supposed to exist and act as a sort of guidepost for you as you design your product or solution. Typically they're based on real data/feedback but can also be generalized to fit a larger audience. Personas should never co-exist with the final product. That's where you're supposed to perform user testing and verify the validity of your ...


2

It seems more like a narrative for a user-test, rather than the narrative for a persona, which are more a general "bio" regarding the user. To me a persona consists of: Name, Picture & Demography Bio Goals Frustrations If you decide to go with proto-personas, don't forget to actually test them with your real audience by qualitative and quantitive ...


0

I've been trying for ten years to use personas and get clients to engage with them, with varying degrees of success. Least success: the Alan Cooper The Inmates are Running the Asylum kind of persona as described by @Rumi P. Clients find them patronising or oversimplified, as a rule. Most success: the type of approach you're talking about. They resonate ...


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I've always thought of personas as a simplified, normalized aggregate of user research. E.g. I have a list of 100 common tasks from interviewing users, the 10 most frequent/important of those end up on the persona document for that group.


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The best way to do this would be to go out into the field, to watch your target audience in their own environment and to interview them about their current behavior and what they think their future behavior might be in the future. Take some time to analyze and think about each person. You should interview about 3 people, per persona. Focus on behavior ...



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