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21

You should never save credit card information, client or server, unless you are PCI compliant. PCI stands for Payment Card Industry. You can view their website here. The standard of which we are all held to when handling credit cards is the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS). You can get around having to be PCI compliant if you use a ...


19

Well it's not a completely unused pattern: I see this pattern mostly used where the purchase button is the only step in the process (that or purchase button + sign in/password). This is how Google Play, iTunes/the App Store and Amazon's App store all work. Note the following about all of these stores: There's no cart. There's one step and (usually) no ...


15

If a trial required me to enter these details before beginning the trial, I turn the other way and would not use the product at all. There is no good reason to gather these details in advance other than to increase the chance that the user will forget about the trial and get an automatic bill. I have all too often installed trial software and forgotten about ...


14

Reds, yellows and oranges are spotted swifter by the human eye, and multivariant testing typically confirms that call-to-action buttons get the most clicks when they're orange - and by a significant margin. Reds and yellow both do well; greens often come out poorest. Yellow possibly fares a little worse on the web because humans have a harder time resolving ...


10

Your shipping and billing information is pretty crucial to the process of placing an order. If it's incorrect, your order will be misdelivered (not cool) or you won't be able to charge the customer correctly for the order. Like any input that has such huge consequences for a software process, it is good UX to allow the user to review this essential ...


8

Free shipping is known to be one of the most effective marketing tools e-commerce sites have. Shipping fees can affect the number of items a customer purchases, and they can decrease how frequently a customer makes purchases from the site: With fees, shoppers will make fewer shopping trips and purchase more goods at a time -- not unlike shoppers who ...


8

I work at an eCommerce website and adding PayPal (though buggy) helped out conversion rates. However, adding a bunch did not. If you are building a CMS I believe it is best that you allow who ever is setting it up to choose which they want presented to users and to use. They might not want their money split up.


7

From a user experience perspective, I would be frustrated with this restriction. My wife and I share the same credit card accounts and have different user accounts on sites like Amazon for example. I have often purchased things for friends in exchange for cash because they didn't have a card or the credit available. It is a good idea, but in practice could ...


7

We've been telling people to look for the lock in the address bar and to mistrust anything that says it's secure but doesn't have the lock. Any way you look at it, it's going to look like you're phishing and no amount of design is going to help you with that. That doesn't mean everything needs to be on SSL. Amazon isn't but takes you to a secure server for ...


5

More often that not, what you have to store is determined by your payment processor and so you usually have very little say in the matter. When you do, the general rule for security is to only store what you absolutely have to. The less information you store, the lower your security risk, and the less information customers have to enter (in general) the ...


5

The answer is going to be fairly region specific. For example, if you were setting up PayPal for a site targeted at a country that doesn't have a high penetration of credit cards, you would likely not see much benefit, and you should look at more regional payment solutions. Most people only care that their preferred method of payment is available, so you ...


5

This is a "Steps Left" pattern: The Steps Left pattern is used when it is critical to maintain the user’s focus throughout the process of filling in data to the system. This is for instance critical in web-shops, where the checkout process is often guided by this pattern. In web-shops, the checkout process is the most critical part of the site, as this ...


5

I don't know of any reliable research but: these guys report 33.7% increase in conversion rate after adding paypal. a comment for this article suggests it works. so does this blog. a cautionary note is in this article which is really worth reading if you are to replace current methods with paypal (not a good option - you better add it). But seems to me ...


4

You have to make sure users entered the correct email address prior to proceeding with the order, otherwise billing information could reach the wrong person or be lost. Also, just because you need an email address doesn't mean users have to sign up: Should registration be optional on an e-commerce site? Edit: If the users need to register prior to ...


4

Why not a responsive form using radio buttons? All 4 form fields will be visible straightaway, so let's say if they wanted to pay with a SWIFT number, but didn't know that it's a "same day payment", they can still do so without additional clicks. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups If the user has info for both ...


3

I recommend reading this excellent case study of how Evernote got its customers to pay for its service which was initally free. To quote the article But according to one hugely successful startup which operates under the Freemium model, Evernote, converting free to paid is all about engagement. "The easiest way to get a million people to pay for ...


3

Without knowing the numbers for the lifetime value of a customer, and the percentage of people that do give you new credit card information, we can only offer generic advice. Ideally you should make sure that there is something in it for your customer. Something like giving them a month free service if they update their credit card details within the next ...


3

You should always let the user know the price. As for why you don't see it on the button: The price is typically present somewhere else on the page ( I'm thinking in terms of ecommerce ) very noticeably. It may just be redundant to have it on the button as well. That's my opinion, at least.


3

Clearing the entire form based on an invalid entry will certainly frustrate users. This being true of any form, for any purpose. Registering for a site, for example, and entering a username that is already taken should not clear out your other details -- you should simply point out that the username is taken. I have dealt with both scenarios when entering ...


3

You might not ask, but it's important to inform Otherwise, you might run into some legal issues if that saved data was ever compromised. First, there's the problem that the data was compromised. Second, there's the issue that the user wasn't given proper notice that the data was being saved. You could add this to your terms and conditions page, but ...


2

I think the payment button in an e-commerce shop should reflect the main colors in the branding. ex. If the logo is purple with white then the payments/purchase button should be along those lines. This way if the user "likes" the brand then he'll "like" the button too... But yes, red/orange creates more emotion than other colors in certain type of ...


2

This has nothing to do with how you feel about this. It has everything to do with what works better for your business. I run a SaaS myself, and we require a credit card upfront to enter our 30-day free trial. For some services, no credit card upfront works really well. For example, business to business software where an employee tries it out and then goes ...


2

Others do not for whatever reason - too long, got accepted to another school that doesn't accept the application, gave up, etc. For me, this is the heart of the issue. To make them pay up-front is a business decision that raises some interesting questions/issues. Paying up front tells the user they should not start the process until they are sure it ...


2

Put simply, its bad practice to be accepting money from a user if you have no way of crediting them. If you accept payment and dont know that their email address is genuine then I guarantee two things will happen... 1) There will be customers who enter a bad email address, pay some money, and then never reap the rewards of their purchase. There will be a ...


2

The only question here is whether or not you want unverified users accessing your app. From a UI perspective, you always want to move the user to the application as fast as possible. All the email confirmation is good for is verifying that you have a human being that you can communicate with at a later point. So in this case, move them along to the app and ...


2

If you want your users to love you, you would ask for their confirmation before charging. If you want to run the type of website people learn to avoid, charge them without warning. An OK middle ground is to warn them a couple of days before with an easy way to opt out. Have a read of http://wiki.darkpatterns.org/Home


2

Where you show the delivery fees shouldn't change based on your payment method, and any incentive should be shown at the same time as the delivery fees. You should show the delivery fees as soon as you have enough information to calculate them, which would usually be after you have a shipping address. You should generally try to keep related information ...


2

From a user point of view, I still have friends who are scared of using their credit cards online; I usually more than gladly offer my credit card details because I get reward points on my card, so for example on Apple's site my credit card has been used by four different users. Had the restriction existed, the merchant probably wouldn't have had the same ...


2

If that is the case, you want the customer to think of the price in terms of points, not in terms of currency. If they think in terms of points, they will be more likely to spend them, and I take it that is your goal. So ignoring the poor layout here, I would rather have something like: Price....................980 points ...


2

The answer depends on what you mean by "voucher code". Is this a one-time-use code like a gift certificate, or a code that can be used by many different people? If you're talking about a one-time-use code (Gift Certificate) If you're designing codes to be used only once, it may be likely that people are very often using a code in conjunction with the ...



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