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Rather than Showing them Password Strength. Show them in this way. For low password strength-----"Anyone can steal and guess your password" For medium password strength----"Brilliant people like James bond can guess and steal it easily". For Strong password ----- "Even god can't guess or steal .Good job"...Something like that :)


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Yes,couldn't agree more . Users like to achieve more thing doing less operations in any field as a matter of fact. But I tried to solve the problem with respect to the requirement , that has been mentioned in the question.


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Even though you will save space by combining both fields onto a single page, I would be inclined to present each field on it's own screen. The user elects to pay The user is prompted for password - the user enters password The user is prompted for OTP This way each page could have it's own intro text and help links if required. Otherwise you would need ...


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When they enter all their details and click on pay, show them the password field as well as the OTP field. At the same time you should send the OTP to their mobile. When they click confirm or submit, they should be able to do the transaction. You are reducing the number of clicks. You are doing all operations on a single page. No complexity for the user ...


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Don't The user wants to give their credit card info and delivery address (if applicable) and nothing else. Ecomms on mobile is already bad enough without these extra steps; think how simple a real-world transaction and then go back to this system and you'll see what I mean. you might find this link useful http://baymard.com/blog/mobile-checkout


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A company I work for recently had a speaker come and talk about this topic in particular. She is a PHD so she does a lot of research on Passwords and Security... She mentioned in her talk that the human brain can really only remember three words at a time, something like that. The conclusion for me was: until every website that requires a password ...


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I think you should have the validation happen as they type. I agree with you that it is a little annoying as a user ("I know it doesn't match, I haven't finished yet!") but because its the last field before the submit button, it seems to the best choice for a bad situation. Of course as Taritaro pointed out, if the password is correct do let them know :)


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I don't agree with what you say about checking for the repeated password being useless and annoying. This would be a different type of validation and therefore it would require different action from the user (re-type the password again) And I don't understand why since this is the last field in the form makes it more complicated. I would go with what the ...


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Too bad you cannot remove the confirm password field. The method that forms guru Luke Wroblewski recommends is to simply show the password rather than masking it in the first place. Since you don't make that call, the validation should happen on focus out event of the confirm password field.


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Now that I know it isn't for any security reason, I'll fall back on the reason being tradition, ignorance, and laziness. Okay, maybe someone thought if you make the user enter the password again (possibly the third time after entering it twice to reset it), the user is more likely to remember it. I don't know if that is really a net gain for the user or ...


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I just want to check that I understand the situation you're worried about: They signed up on the site and provided an email address. The system sent an email to this address, requesting that they click a link. They didn't click the link. Later, they want to get into the site but they've forgotten the password. Now, you say: Clearly, sending them an ...


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Ask yourself the following: Is the content on the web page supposed to be disclosed and hidden from unauthorized users? Do you want to restrict social sharing from those users you’re e-mailing? Is it a bad thing that users you haven’t e-mailed also get hold of the information through trusted friends? Do users in general trust an obviously unsafe password ...


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The problem with putting the "change password" functionality on the page is that you risk confusing the user. Consider the following (slightly modified) screenshot of an actual forum's "edit profile" page: Is a user who wants to add an ICQ number to their profile required to change their password while doing so?


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Having the 'forgot password' on another 'view' is not necessarily bad if you're able to influence how the developer implements the page transitions. Consider using one of these very smooth page transitions examples like a flip, slide in etc which allows the user to quickly view the 'hidden' forgot password view or navigate back to the normal landing view.


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Overall this looks like a great start. However, consider the following points to help streamline the UX making your design more efficient and easier to use. If possible make one purpose per page. You don't want a password form validation error scenario on the Promo Code page. One purpose pages are also favorable for keyboard/enter form submissions. ...


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What does the "Change password" link actually do? If it shows a modal pop-up over this page, then I think a link is ok. A link could also be good to display the form inline when requested - that way the page isn't cluttered until the user needs the form, and maintains the same context. If it actually takes you to another page, it seems a bit odd. Why ...



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