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One thing that is missing and you should have is - information on total number of pages available. In your screen shot user does not know how many pages there are when the grid loads. Knowing that information is good but you still need validation. I suggest an alternate solution. I think this is simpler UI , no explicit go to buttons , it keeps controls ...


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I think both approaches are correct as long as the users knows the number of pages S/he can navigate to. Something like this...


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Did you consider using other ways to select a page number? One of the challenges of allowing a person to type into a field is they may not even type a number, so you will need to consider all sorts of other types of data entry field validation. If you use an alternate way for selecting the page, which doesn't involve typing, then the person cannot enter ...


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You can either leave the Go button enabled or disabled. But, disabling it without providing the reason might confuse the user which may ask himself "why is this disabled?". Your suggestion to highlight the box and providing the tool-tip is a common and good solution to validation of the page number.


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IMHO, your approach is way too convoluted and has a lot of friction. Having a modal with inner navigation (or a stepper) and then a submit button only after all steps were completed is asking for trouble. First of all, when you use a modal, you use to interrupt a flow and require an action based on the context. If you have multiple actions, you're losing ...


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For the how, it is certainly possible and there are a number of templates and patterns for doing so available, such as this one. In that example you could use "Bug X" instead of "Step X" in your headers and you'd have a nice step-by step modal with a progress bar to show the SCRUM master his progress. As for the question of should you the primary ...


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This is largely dependant on whether, in the collection view, you intend to show the comments for individual books in a collection or if you only intend to show comments for the collection. The simplest solution is to only allow comments for the collection - on a collection page you will only show a single board with comments for that particular collection. ...


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Put a small link to the comments section directly under "Collection Name" This will make the comments section discoverable, even if it is low on the page. It will also help clarify that the comments are associated with the collection. For the actual comments, putting them on the bottom of the page, as you have shown, might work with this additional cue. ...


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You've designed it well. The comments should be beneath the list of books to support consistency with other websites. Comments should be always after the main content of the page. The only thing you can improve, in order to save valuable screen space above the fold of the page is to move the navigation up where the "Website title" area is. You don't want to ...



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