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24

Having a blank field that means that all Organizations/Locations can access the item is really confusing. There should be a default that says "All Organizations" and "All Locations". It can be shown if the value is Null, if that is appropriate for the underlying code, but it needs to show the user what is going on. Changing the code to not confuse the ...


16

I believe this was simply done because we read from top to bottom. The choice was made pretty early on, and was probably influenced a lot by technical limitations. Because text is encoded linearly, most text editors (not necessarily word processors) had a limit in the number of columns and rows they could display. If you go far back this was typically along ...


12

Forget about age. It is an arbitrary number without real meaning. Age groups are bad. It would mean that when I am 39 I would still fall in 30-40 and would be excluded from the 40-50 group that may be more appropriate for me by then. Having users decide on an age range is much better, but still arbitrary. More importantly: many people don't like to be ...


12

Regardless of the solution criteria, why not populating the field with a default value in grey? Telling your users what the field actually does without their input. If they're happy with it they'll move on, otherwise they'll replace it. As per the default criteria, I would choose the less painful i.e. "As a user the less input I have to provide the better I ...


9

Perhaps you could use a balanced tree-like structure that grows outwards at the sides (alternately) as more people join the conversation. Colour code it in vertical strips which each start as a new voice enters - like a piece of colourised vertically annotated choral music (a fugue?). You could maybe tail off a strip once that voice has had its last say so ...


8

Customer Service is a valuable source of statistics and real User Experience. You get instant feedback when the product fails technically or in its User Experience. Treated right you will have a top list of UX-issues, where your users fail completing tasks. Take this top list to UX department, and they’ll be happy to read where real users failed and why. I ...


8

According to Microsoft's User Experience Interaction Guidelines: "People read in a left-to-right, top-to-bottom order (in Western cultures) There are two modes of reading: immersive reading and scanning. The goal of immersive reading is comprehension. ...the goal of scanning is to locate things. " "Users tend to skip over large blocks of text ...


7

Absolutely! Intuit (the company that makes Quicken) has product designers staff their customer support lines for precisely this reason: to bring customers' experiences directly to products designers, and make customer service free. Higher-salaried product designers field service calls so that future offerings will be informed by customers directly, ...


5

Given that some users are uncomfortable with the idea of people of all ages being "allowed" to an event, I'd go for a combination of letting the creators of events being allowed to specify an age range, but make it clear that it's a suggested range. You could also perhaps have an indication of any legal/insurance requirements for activities (must be over ...


5

Why make users guess or learn something when you can be explicit and unambiguous? Taking organisation as an example, I suggest having the following entries in the picker: "All organisations" "No organisations" and no blank entry. Default to "all" or "no", or — if it makes sense to do so — one of the organisations. Doing this means no party can have ...


4

Humans read more than one word at a time, we perceive words and letters in their context. Whcih why is you can raed tihs. Scrolling vertically presents a whole set of context (a new line of text), scrolling horizontally presents only single characters or words at a time without enough context to understand. It isn't about established conventions, those ...


4

When consuming text, scrolling down allows to reveal the text more gradually than a horizontal scroll. If you just want to see another line you don't need to flip the whole page. Since we read top to down, as one of the commentators mentions, vertical scroll matches better how we "consume the lines". For languages where users read top to bottom horizontal ...


4

An org chart is not about the relationship between people, but rather about the relationship between positions (usually of responsibility) within the organisation. We ase just used to each position being filled by one person, but that is not necessarily the case. Taken from Wikipedia (with my own emphasis): An organizational chart is a diagram that ...


4

This is a huge question and cannot be answered in a simple answer but here are some recommendations based upon personal experience and what has worked best for me Stakeholders generally dont have time to go through sheaf's and sheaf's of data. Hence talk to them to find out what is the most important detail they want (taking your example in the comments, ...


3

Edit: think I understand better now - there are 2 fields (one per taxonomy)? Your customer's view is not an incorrect one if the security model is more permissive (i.e., most things are open to everybody). From a UX perspective it might still be better to make the user select a value to indicate this choice, i.e., "All Locations", rather than it being ...


3

Despite the efforts of UI and UX professionals, users sometimes get stuck, or experience bugs using software. I think we can agree that their frustration is an indicator of bad user experience. Completely agree. Bugs happen, it's an indicator of a poor user experience, but let's break that down. Bugs aren't necessarily a result of a poorly designed ...


3

A blank means nothing and nothing may mean many things to many minds. I don't see any harm is changing Blank to Everyone and Everywhere but if it was blank, you would need to educate your user for blank's intended behavior. Having a note text under the blank field may do the job. "Leaving the field blank would mean everybody has access to this document". ...


3

To quote from the Zen of Python: Explicit is better than implicit An empty field can mean anything from those two default values mentioned to the software crashing if no input is provided, and there is no way this will not be ambiguous. So do provide the default as e.g. light-grey text, be that a simple "none" or "any". Which of these to choose is a ...


3

I think this is a case where user research would be of valuable information where you should actually have a discussion with the different user groups and see what is the exact information are they looking for and what the cases where they want to dig down to the granularity of data. I have in my experience generally found that users usually want access to ...


2

These are few enough elements to be ordered inline on the same row (level), possibly like this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Home and logo navigates to the start page. Then we group Products and Group together with more whitespace surrounding these elements. The same goes for Users and Teams who also are ...


2

I used LittleSnapper for Mac and you can easily categorized your images and you can make folders also. I used also different social bookmarking tools such as Zootool and Minus to share and organized screen capture images from the web.


2

Org charts are almost always displayed top-to-bottom, as opposed to left-to-right: This is obviously more complicated from a technical standpoint, but probably offers the best user experience. I would try sketching some ideas where you start with a blank top level, and leaving a "blank" branch at each level with an "Add" button. If you're planning to go ...


2

It seems like you are already using color to indicate a variety of things. I would suggest something different. Can you have the row text all appear as bold when it is unapproved? Can those unapproved rows be sorted to the top by default? As for the action of approval, I think it depends on your audience and requirements. For simplicity's sake, I would ...


2

Benny is spot in saying that Customer service is an excellent source of statistics and user experience issues as they are often the first point of contact for frustrated users in understanding the system. Also another thing to note is that customer service are often power users of the system and are well aware of the various process flows users can take to ...


2

"User experience" encompasses all aspects of the end-user's interaction with the company, its services, and its products. The first requirement for an exemplary user experience is to meet the exact needs of the customer, without fuss or bother. Next comes simplicity and elegance that produce products that are a joy to own, a joy to use. True ...


2

I do like your tag cloud option and seems like a good interactive way to get information across. However the challenge with auto tagging is that an letter can getting tagged incorrectly (assuming the example of letters to grandma). E.g. The letter might read like this : Dear Grandma Hope you are doing good. I am doing well though I am not happy as ...


2

Actually, I think your second example is less symetric than your first. Think of the space around items in your view as belonging to the item, a constant margin around each item. It then suddenly makes sense that there is less (half) as much margin between the edge of the view and the first item than there is between items themselves. In the latter case, you ...


2

How do you define a product or service, in User Experience terms? You look at the collection of touch points between it and its users. You can prioritize these touch points by the impact they have on the usability of your service. By the logic above, the way in which Customer Service interacts with your users is a crucial part of your user experience - how ...


2

I'm a UX Architect for a fortune 500 company and I have a very big portfolio to manage, so i'd firstly say this is a UX question not a Project Management question as it's a fair question to seek in a forum like this. My approach thus far. Create a UX Repository of Excellence. You running around chasing down team(s) to see what they are up to isn't going ...


2

A combination of alphabetical arrangement and grouping by common useage would by my suggestion. When you're cooking, 2 things are true of the use of herbs and spices: You read the name of the ingredient in a recipe or know the name of the one you need (therefore can easily work out how far along an alphabetical row it would appear) You tend to use groups ...



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