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50

Emails were never intended as a form of chat type messaging. Remember that they are electronic versions of mail, so trying to modify them to be something they weren't designed for is a mistake. As to the reasons why we write the subject line first: The subject line is part of the header of an email (see the original RFC822 and the newer RFC5322), and ...


43

For readers: You need to know what the stuff is all about. For writer: You need to know what the stuff you are going to write about.


16

11 items is a difficult number of things to arrange in more than one line, but it's very easy around a circle. How about something like the following which might still be inkeeping with your needs I also decreased the size of the icons in relation to the labels in my version, but this is just a mock up anyway - you can obviously take the idea and adapt ...


12

I prefer comments to be in chronological order and threaded. That way, when comments turn into conversations - and they often do, those are easy to follow. Any other order of comments makes it impossible, or at least very hard. Newest on top means you have to go down to see what is being responded to. And if you decide to start at the bottom, you are ...


11

The idea behind tags is the same as the idea behind labels in GMail: the ability to assign multiple tags to a single post/mail/.../item. The GMail labeling of e-mails was born specifically to counter the need in most e-mail clients to archive an e-mail in a single specific folder which ususally would be part of a hierarchy of folders. So what do you do with ...


11

Though the number of steps you defined looks fine to me, This is going to be really hard question to answer unless you show screenshots of the pages in question since there are single page checkouts as well which handle the information density well and guide the user well. But to answer your question, there is no right or wrong number of checkout steps as ...


9

Just tried to improve the concept taken from above designs. I tried to group functionality that works together. Data sources | Arcgis server | coordinate systems describe connections to external systems. Queries and Maps (i guess the mostly used functions) have moved to right hand corner where users will find it more easy to locate. Product logo is ...


9

1. You could split it into logical sections, where you have first 3 colums with these: "Datasources", "ArcGis servers" "Users", "Roles" "Tools", "Settings" And then the rest on a single line below: "Coordinate Systems", "Maps", "Queries", "Layouts", "Reports" 2. Have the Esri logo at top left, and the Dekho logo at top right. This way, the symetry ...


9

I'd like to approach this question from a bit of a different perspective than that of other answers. What's In An Order The essential question posed is questioning the philosophy and methodology of ordering form fields. On the one hand, one might wish to order them in the order that the author would be expected to write them. This is a perfectly sensible ...


9

This may be similar to the question Why don't ATMs give you cash before your card?: Users follow the tasks in sequence, but regard the task as completed once they have achieved their goal. Subsidiary steps are easy to abandon at this point. The goal of writing an email is conveying information. Once the message body is complete that goal is supposedly ...


8

Vertical lists are much easier to scan than horizontal lists, because all items are aligned to the same line, so when you're looking for an item, you don't need to read the entire word - you can quickly scan the first letters and get directly to the item you need. See how much less time it takes you to locate items beginning with P on Craigslist (within a ...


8

I personally feel like if you try to think of your application as a real life human being, then it helps design all the interactions with a user in a more meaningful way. So in this example, the user wants to ask your app a question/enquiry. Now if your app was a human being, how would that play out? User: Hello, I have a question. Do you have the Planet ...


7

I think ordering menu items is a bit less strict and more flexible than that. First of all, the ordering is not perceived strictly top to bottom: there are actually three relative positions that people will use (and remember): top, middle and bottom. Rearranging items will mostly put off users when it is sorting with this relative order, but some individual ...


7

I create a thing. After I create it, I preview it. If I like what I previewed, then I publish it. After I've published it, I want to share it. Once I've shared it, I want to get stats on it. When I'm all done with it, I delete it. So - preview -> publish -> share -> stats -> delete - completely logical! In addition delete makes good sense not to be in ...


7

Is the equity of choice a good thing for the user? If the user could benefit from better load balancing due to shorter queue times, longer assistance or better resources, why not expose that fact to the users and let them choose less busy staff for their own sake? If the equity isn't useful for the user, try exposing more points of difference in the list so ...


6

If you have nothing else to guide a sorting order, alphabetic makes the most sense. At the very least it creates an affordance for repeated use, where people will likely recall the name of a previously used menu item before learning the position, and if they're asked to select an item from that menu by documentation or another person, they'll be able to find ...


6

To be a bit simplistic, the more orderly the layout seems, the more the order has meaning to users. Masonry-style brick layouts, to varying degrees, subvert traditional orthographic order. I would suggest that this subversion is intentional, and this subversion accounts for the charm of these interfaces. The layouts are unpredictable, and I am ...


6

Users typically want to see the most recent activity first. Think tweets, online banking transactions, news updates. It makes it easy to see what's new since you last checked. With conversations, it's different because there is the context of whatever message came before and after the one you're looking at. It's a similar situation to what you see in ...


6

As a reader, I want to know "Why are you sending me this email?" so I know whether it is worth my while reading it now, instead of doing all those other important things on my to-do list. As a reader, I expect the writer to know why they are sending me the email, and more to the point, I hope they will know why they are sending me the email before they ...


5

It's a tradeoff. Chronological order is better for readability of threads, worse for diminishing the value of comments from latecomers, and for enabling early-bird campers to permanently stamp their agenda on the page. This sums the first readability problem up neatly (credit: someone's forum signature, I forget where): They break the natural flow of a ...


5

My first thought would be alphabetically, because this is static and generally easy to find what you want - assuming that you can show everything on one page, and scrolling is not needed to see others, particularly common ones. As long as your names are clear, this should be easy to learn and use. Adaptive menus are a definately no no. Changing the orders ...


5

Your options for sorting things are as follows: Frequency of use, with more frequent items at the top. This is often a good choice even when all items are visible at once. With a drop down, you know the mouse is initially at the drop down arrow, so this puts the most frequent choices closer to the mouse for faster selection, consistent with Fitts Law. This ...


5

And if it has maximum of 30 items and all of them are visible why you just not place an action at the end of the list and add an ability to quickly reorder the list? So, position of the new item will be obvious. And you can keep the selection untouched in this case.


4

We are facing a similar situation where our client has a huge catalog and wants to allow its users to successively filter down the content by drilling down into a hierarchy defined by them; a hierarchy they can decide to change anytime and as much as they want. Add to that the fact that the target platform is Android, its omnipresent back button and ...


4

I would display 1 primary timezone (by geolocation as mentioned above, or by any other parameter), and provide easy access to the rest. Sunday, January 1st | 1:00 PM EST (more timezones)


4

You could balance the workload by assigning points to the translators but hiding those from the user. Let's say we have 5 translators: Alfred, Bianca, Carlos, Dave, and Eliza. Assuming lazy users we'd expect Alfred to shoulder most of the workload, especially in a very long alphabetized list. Instead, let's say that every time a translator completes a ...


4

Personally I'd go with option B on iOS, and would look what do Androids show. On desktop, I'd use some kind of "bumping", it's important, you can see why here in this answer: http://ux.stackexchange.com/a/25032/16685


4

There are two main eye patterns for web design. The first: F-Shaped Reading Pattern The second: ZigZag/Triangle Reading Pattern Deisngs that fit into one of these two will work well with user. However if you are looking to get even more creative you can try out using the Golden Ratio to design a webpage, specifically placing content in the golden spiral ...


4

37signals has a great example of how you can make this interesting for the user and help them understand your story. No offense to the HR professional who commented (though, it wouldn't be the first time I've offended HR), a history page that starts with the present is probably too much about what you want to say. Your current achievements are, hopefully, ...


4

You should present the most important information first, and so that will determine the order that you present the logs in. For most logging applications, the most recent logs are more important, and so it's better UX to present the newest items first. However, there are situations where each log is fairly long, and either the older logs are more critical, ...



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