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I think without real images or context, it is difficult to say what is the best approach. When the images you show are all alike, the text is some generic description, and no background of scope, don't expect people to give the best answer to you. I've had real life situations where radio buttons with only text and no images worked better; on other ...


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Option boxes are the wrong answer in this case as they aren't suited for this use case. Use option boxes to select one exclusive option. You might want to rearrange the items. This could be either done by drag and drop or some sorting functions. Drag and drop makes it hard for the user to spot if the functionality's there and also on mobile devices. You ...


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The drag and drop and "older version" of it - using arrows: Drag and drop needs to have well solved interactions (how it behaves and looks like when dragging, how it looks like when you can and can't drop it). This is good thing to do, but only in case if you have a solid library to implement it (true on web, rarely true for desktop app frameworks). ...


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Quoting Jakob Nielsen here: " If possible, use radio buttons rather than drop-down menus. Radio buttons have lower cognitive load because they make all options permanently visible so that users can easily compare them. Radio buttons are also easier to operate for users who have difficulty making precise mouse movements. (Limited space might sometimes force ...



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