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First thing you probably know is that you want to allow or deny something. So the first choice to make is to allow or to deny it, followed by the choice if that is permanently or just for once: Think of it as a conversation: Do you want to allow or deny it? And do you want that permanently or this time only? Makes more sense than: Do you ...


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I think a checkbox disguised as a radiobox is the way to go, esp. with two choices. If the user clicks on an item to select nothing then they have "intuitively" selected the other. It's all about good taste. User could sit there for hours clicking on remaining item only to see the other item selected, looking heavenward for some sort of explanation. The ...


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With radiobuttons it requires exactly one action to select (or correct) any of the options. With checkboxes it takes two to select both and two to change A to B. I might look at something else if desserts came into the picture, though.


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The easiest and most intuitive thing for the first time user is two checkboxes with validation to prevent turning off both. The reasoning is that the user reads down the options one by one and judges each one separately in order. They are not trying to optimize their number of clicks on first visit, they're trying to optimize their cognitive load; as they ...


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I would do a simple 3 choice radio button. Here's an example of one I did in 2 minutes with jQuery UI:  Click to see demo in action


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For a simple A, B, and A + B selection you shouldn't need to get too fancy and radio buttons are a good approach: They are an instantly recognized widget for 1-of-N choices. They spell out the options clearly. Users need only 1 click to select any option (vs up to 2 for checkboxes). Radio buttons and checkboxes are both small controls so the added ...


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Radio Buttons with 3 Options In this situation you can easily select a default value, but radio buttons are not the most common thing in mobile. You commonly find single selection lists instead. A different solution is likely the better course. Dropdown You simply require an extra click to perform the above option, and you hide the other two possibilities ...


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Like many UX question, this one has to be answered case-by-case with context attached. Increased complexity is definitely a key penalty of options, so is the usability-flexibility tradeoff. You also have to remember to options often mean more cognitive load for users (more variations = less consistency; and more choices). If I'm to write examples of pros ...


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Usability decreases as flexibility increases Usability vs flexibility is well known issue, particualry when it comes to enterprise software! Sometimes though, decisions in this area are not entirely designer led.. business pirorities as well as the need to remain competitive drive the demand for more configurable and flexible solutions. There is ...


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It seems like your original assumptions are wrong. if it is made intuitive and clear, is not a problem. If it is designed and organized well it shouldn’t be a problem to have a quazillion options as long as they are intuitive, independent and it is what users want. The problem is that many options are not intuitive nor clear. They seems intuitive and ...



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