Hot answers tagged

109

It is necessary if you have different versions of the website for Desktop and Mobile. For example, a lot of websites scrap out features that might get too complicated to be operated on Mobile. For example, Facebook's Mobile version does not feature all of its settings. It is also possible that a large tablet which can process a webpage faster like a ...


58

Personally, I think such an option is essential. For two reasons: Users might be accustomed to the desktop interface. For example, a user that is used to access the website through a desktop can have a really hard time finding the controls he is accustomed to in the mobile version. This is bad if the user wants to use the mobile version just once (e.g. ...


24

The UK Government Data Standards Catalogue suggests 35 characters for each of First Name and Surname (h/t Ian Nelson on Stack Overflow). That's how many characters you should assume for displaying the name or accepting input. However, I don't think a text field needs to be 35 characters wide. (Johnjacobjingleheimerschmidt should be able to type his name, ...


20

Primary Reasons for Desktop site's necessity can be summarized in 3 bullet points: Compatibility Issues Providing Limited Working Features (while still working on full feature roll out) Redirecting for alternative Rich Experience The trend came about with the advent and early popularity stage of mobile sites ~10-12 years ago, because most mobile sites ...


18

I turn my phone sideways and it has higher resolution than my desktop. When you optimize for 320x480, and a tiny device comes along with over 2500x1400, there are going to be issues. The mobile version of most sites almost invariably is the worst UX. (--Worst UX for me, personally. I mean, obviously there are people who like the mobile versions, which is ...


15

No, neither is better. They deal with different aspects or strategies, and in general you need both. A small change lets you refine your design and have a better understanding of what affects conversion, but may let you end up with a local maxima. A more radical change with many elements will not help you understand what affects conversion, but may also ...


15

Hard Limits In the 10ms-5ms range you're running into the refresh rates and response times of pixels on your monitor. Many monitors are limited to 60Hz (17ms refresh). You're also getting close to limits of visual perception. We take around 100ms to direct our eyes to something new that has appeared on screen. Noise The difference between a compile ...


10

Well sometimes the mobile version of the site lacks content that is only available in the desktop version. This is often done to save bandwith (lower quality of images or exclude some elements completely) and eliminate visual clutter. Users might want to see that content from their mobile devices, so providing an link to the desktop or full site is suggested....


8

While not talking about response times as low as the question, there are some very interesting results from tests carried out by Google and Bing here: http://radar.oreilly.com/2009/06/bing-and-google-agree-slow-pag.html The bottom line is that users interact more with responsive web pages and the companies made more profit. I would think it's not too ...


8

Steve Krug's opinion In Don't Make Me Think, Revisited, Chapter 10 deals with mobile usability. Steve Krugg states the following (emphasis mine): Always provide a link to the "full" Web site. No matter how fabulous and complete your mobile site is, you do need to give users the option of viewing the non-mobile version, especially if it has features and ...


7

Was this a One-tailed Test? First of all, I think your statistical test is giving you a 1-tailed p-value, rather than a 2-tailed p-value that you should use in what sounds like exploratory work. I think you’re saying your p-value is 0.02 (i.e., there is a 2% chance of getting the observed difference in conversions by random luck). However, if the number of ...


7

There are two separate properties to consider here; the character space on screen and the number of characters that will be accepted. You could use a text field box where the user can continue typing and the previous content moves off-screen. Your aim here is to have a visible space big enough for most people to fit their names into, and to be large enough ...


5

Kudos for the effort - very nice! I have a few comments about the list at the end: Personally I feel tag clouds aren't very useful. The order between the elements isn't clear, it's not always easy to see which is bigger and you don't know what are the tags sorted by. As for your second suggestion, I might have a tiny improvement, but it doesn't feel ...


5

Although all of the above could be part of a UX designers role if you are focused purely on analytics and conversions then potential roles titles would probably include the word analyst and be prepended by: Business/web/marketing/digital. http://www.clickz.com/clickz/column/1712911/becoming-experienced-invaluable-web-analyst The other angle to approach it ...


5

It sounds like you need multivariate testing. For example, select four elements on the page you'd like to test. You could radically redesign each of the elements so that in one version of the test, you're testing a mostly redesigned page. Then those four elements would be turned "on" or "off" alternately. You'd end up with 16 variations against your control (...


5

Typically, the top performing apps have shorter (branded) titles The average for the top 200 free apps are: 26 characters 4.5 words But it probably doesn't matter App title length – if penalized at all by Apple, is easily offset by increased downloads or other variables weighted by Apple’s app store algorithm. It is up to the publisher/...


4

Your client is basically correct - your users need to be able to find what they are looking for quickly and efficiently - not only is this good UX, but in e-commerce it improves conversions and therefore profit. However, their insistence that all three menus be visible at once is misguided and perhaps even detrimental to the fundamental user goal mentioned ...


4

Why did this trend come about? For developing websites there are three major approaches toward how they are developed*: Responsive Web Design Adaptive Web Design Separate "Desktop" and "Mobile" sites Responsive Web Design (RWD) is where a site is designed in a way that it changes to fit whatever screen size it is rendered on. From a technological ...


4

Yes, If desktop users are shown a different version of the site. This is a usability issue. I have seen so many sites that do not display properly on small screens or that do not serve the same content. (usually 'quickmenus'/reduced to content allegedly 90% of users want, not me!)


3

Select then act Spreadsheets lend themselves to selecting the area to act upon then editing or choosing your action. In the case of tagging cells or ranges, as a user I would expect to select my range then apply the tag, not the other way around. There are likely some actions that blur the lines (eg cetain types of large area formatting), but those cases ...


3

Traditionally, common wisdom used to hold that any list should always contain between five and nine items (seven plus or minus two), because humans find it hard to remember more than seven items at a time. However, that only really applies if the user actually has to remember all the items in the first place - and that only counts if the user can't make ...


3

When SEO is done well and honestly, it helps make a good first impression to the visitor who arrives from a web search, as they will find what they expected. If someone looks at a page of results and chooses one because they think it seems right, but arrives on a site that doesn't seem to deliver, they very quickly become frustrated and start off with the ...


3

I'm restraining myself from ranting about designing web experiences, especially mobile, as PSD layouts to be "sliced up". You might consider gently suggesting that your designers google "responsive web design" and "mobile first" and read the conversations/debates around design approaches for the modern, multi-device web. Wait, I said I wouldn't rant, didn't ...


3

When designing for handheld devices you need understand the following concepts Screen size - Actual physical size, measured as the screen's diagonal. Screen density - quantity of pixels within a physical area of the screen; usually referred to as dpi (dots per inch). Orientation - orientation of the screen from the user's point of view. landscape or ...


3

I learned, that in program usage, interaction delays below 0.2 s aren't recognised. A fast secretary makes 600 hits per minute, which is 10/s, most users won't reach 300/min or 5/s. A response faster than 0.2 s is felt as immediate response. You needn't be faster than that.


3

For the next 20 to 50 years, the driving factors in the future of transportation are safety, congestion, and energy efficiency. All three are interrelated. The primary enabling technologies are increasingly cheap and powerful embedded electronics and software for data sensing, transmitting, analysis, and storage. What this means for vehicles in general and ...


3

Maybe use font-size-weighted or font-color approach?


3

Unlike video files that usually only support a constant frame rate, there’s an individual delay between frames in the animated image file formats like AGIF, APNG‌¹, MNG or SVG+SMIL‌². This (and often the lack of sound) is a fundamental difference which simple video to GIF converters cannot take advantage of. I don’t know whether there are advanced ones that ...


3

It was mostly used for "m.websites" (ex: m.cnn.com) which are already off trends and slowly fading away. m.website are basically the same copy of your website with a different URL. You will be feeding content to 2 websites at the same time ex: m.cnn.com and cnn.com have duplicates in content with different screen optimisation. The m.website has many ...


2

I think that the daunting list of tags on this site makes me avoid as subconsciously it scares me by being so long. I think limiting it to top ten with an option to see all of them would make user scan it quickly and see what it going on within a matter of seconds. Also, I could never understand how the tags were sorted. It seems to me that they are sorted ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible