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0

You could map from a scale [0,1] to [0, Infinity), with the condition that the derivative at x=0 is 0, the derivative at x=1 is Infinity and that y=500 at x=0.5, say. For example, f(x) = 1000*x*tan(0.5*pi*x), which looks something like this: On this scale, you have the following values: 0 <-> 0 miles 0.1 <-> 16 miles 0.25 <-> 103 miles 0.5 ...


3

I like your general idea, but it seems that your users are not getting the metaphor. Which leaves you with two options: Make it very skueoumorphic, hoping that they will get the hint. Instead of using a slider, use something which looks like a physical lever that can be pushed more or less to the left (or right), and beside it a spinning number display ...


3

I might be missing something (you might have been referring to this when you said "standard +/- values"), but this seems like the perfect use case for a spinner: The design of the spinner is such that "the appearance of the spinner at a given time does not represent the quantity of the associated value" (Wikipedia). Thus, you wouldn't run into the problem ...


2

Put a logarithmic scale on the slider. Larger values rarely need to be precise, so you can put a quite large upper limit on it. Take the largest conceivable value for this input, add 50%. In response to the system wanting volume rather than substance, I will restate what I said in the above paragraph. The question wants a scrubber/slider-style control, ...


1

I propose that you display (1) a position indicator (displaying a number of miles, for instance) and (2) a "speed knob" (a thumb on a slider). Let's suppose that the speed knob position goes from -1 to 1. Then when it's in position x, you increase, once per tick of some clock (e.g., once every 60th of a second) the position indicator by an amount ...


0

Any kind of control which presents a visual start and stop is going to be problematic for your criteria. Why not just use scroll to modify the input field? The ratio of pixels to distance units can be customized, and scrolling affords a much more natural interaction than repeated clicking/tapping, or trying to carefully navigate a number line. I've prepared ...


20

One interesting solution that hasn't been proposed yet is a sort of "odometer" that the users could set to the desired number. This would have the benefits of preventing users from having to scroll through smaller numbers to get to larger ones, allowing users to be as precise as they wish, and being as simple as plain text entry without messing with a ...


6

I suggest you replace the slider with a dial by removing the thumb indicator and adding arrowheads on either side so it looks something like this: I use a program at work that uses a similar dial to control frequency during an online simulation, and I've never seen anyone get confused with it. Here's the interface:


0

How about having two controls--a pull-down or "zoom" control which selects a range or scale, and a slider which selects a number within the indicated range, or of a suitable scale? Another approach, depending upon the precision with which values must be entered, is to use a logarithmic scale, so that the values 1, 3, 10, 30, 100, 300, 1,000, 3,000, 10,000 ...


28

I've always been enamored at the way the iOS quicktime application works when viewing MP3s in Safari, and I think this method can be adapted for your use. We can stay with a normal slider bar - perhaps the handle could be changed from the normal circle to show a difference. We can add tick marks to the bar and numbers that change on either end. Then, ...


7

Reading @Henrik Ekblom's comment about circular controls reminded me of how the Timer app works on Android phones (image below is from the Timely app). You can add as many minutes/hours to the timer as needed by continuing to drag the cursor in a circle around the clock. Obviously the circular format works a lot better for clock-like functions, and it could ...


1

Hopefully I understand how you've implemented your "thumbwheel" concept so that I'm not simply rehashing the same idea, but the following concept comes based largely on what you've already laid out. At the moment, the way that you've designed the thumbwheel means that to get through large values (such as when adding 10,000 miles), you would need to repeat ...


3

EDIT Whatever number the user enters into the text box, that is the middle value of the slider. They can tweak that number by sliding left (for less miles) or right (more miles). How much distance to place between the middle number and the upper and lower ranges is up to you. In your case, there is a maximum number. 1 Year is 365 Days or 8,760 Hours ...


4

It seems like your users need something that first selects a less detailed milage area, with big steps. When that area is selected it's time to fine tune. One way of doing that could be something like my image below shows. As soon as the user clicks and drags in the span control (A), the red marker follows and a more fine tuned area (B) shows up. The user ...


31

Well, I guess there is a maximum number of miles someone can travel in a year, since there are a finite number of seconds in year, and one cannot exceed the speed of light. A more practical limit may be 1000 miles every three days, which would be about 100,000 miles in a year. I suggest using a normal slider but with a logarithmic scale. i.e. equal spaced ...



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