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23

Old style figures are used in titles and paragraph text. According to Fonts.com old style is suitable for title and paragraph text due to the fact that this gives the text uniform look. The 'modern' style numbers should be used for tables and graphs, since these modern numbers align better when used in these contexts. There are fonts that support both old ...


22

Line numbers need to be countable. It is more intuitive to start counting at 1 instead of 0, because 0 (say: zero) means none, not one. Looking at a coffee mug on your table, you would not answer the question of how many mugs there are by saying: "Zero" - because that would imply no mug at all is on your table. Thus with line numbers, and almost every other ...


21

Consistency is key here I think. So, for currency, always use two decimals and align every number to the right. It took me some time to make sense of the table you displayed in your post. I would go for something like this: tender qty amt 5.00 1 5.00 10.00 1 10.00 100.00 1 100.00 0.05 1 0.05 0.10 1 ...


16

Kontur is correct. But I would also like the add that Arrays in programming start at 0 for a very specific reason. This is not because the number in an array is supposed to 'count' the amount of elements, but instead it is considered an offset value, and thus array[0] merely means that the specific entry is 0 memory positions away from the start of the array ...


12

I like to compare old-style numbers to lowercase, and new-style to capitals. Some typographers even talk about 'lowercase' and 'uppercase numbers'. To my eyes, using UPPERCASE in the middle of a sentence seems odd, also when using numbers in the text. old-style numerals just 'flow' better with the rest of the lowercase letters in a sentence. When available, ...


11

If you leave out the delimiter, then you also remove all doubt related to thousand-separator vs comma separator. Many countries use comma as decimal separator, so "10,000" could be interpreted as "10 comma 000". I believe it depends on the circumstances. In general, the delimiter would increase readability, but sometimes the actual, exact number isn't ...


10

Try doing a google search on calendar icon and then you capture the results (if worth it). Just by skimming the results I saw that 9 was a popular number, but not far from others. From the Semiotics perspective 31 might work, as people easily identify it as the maximum number of days a month can get, and design-wise is filling. I think that only having the ...


8

Jørn's answer is pretty complete. Just to support it, and add a bit: It is easier to read numbers with delimiters - significants and scale are easily recognised that way. In the printed publishing world the delimiter ambiguity is solved by the use a half space character as a delimiter; on the web the same is known as thin space ( ). Like so: ...


7

Back to the question where the answer is yes, it improves readability, at least if you listen to Jakob Nielsen who (yet again) wrote an article on 113 Design Guidelines for Homepage Usability where #112 says: 112) Use a thousands separator appropriate to your locale for numbers that have five or more digits. For example, in the United States, fifty-three ...


7

Yes. English text is usually left-aligned. Numbers are normally aligned so that the various places (unit, tens, etc.) are in columns. If the numbers are integers, this just means right-aligning the numbers. If they have decimal fractions, then the decimal places should be aligned, with the units digits all in a vertical line. This makes it easy to compare ...


7

Yes, I would say that you should only accept characters appropriate to the field. If it's a phone number, you should also accept characters like: ()-+. However, you should let the person know that an invalid key was pressed rather than do nothing. Otherwise you may end up frustrating them. Examples include: a small error message that pops up next to the ...


7

You should add a check box that indicates that the number of things are limited. (Thus: An unchecked box indicates that there are unlimited number of items). download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


6

Early languages like FORTRAN had the first element of an array starting with 1, and it was weird when C came along to use 0. That's only natural to you youngsters. FORTRAN started with 1 because it was natural to number things in a list starting with 1. C started with 0 because it was a language deliberately written to be close to the hardware, whereas ...


6

Vertical lists are better because they are easier to scan. If you draw a line from 1 -> 2 -> 3 in your examples, you will see how much work the eye has to zig-zag through your second example. See this related question about alphabetical lists and the top answer for more discussion.


6

The U.S. Mint is responsible for designing coins and bills, so I contacted them for an answer. No answer yet, but I'll keep you guys posted. :-) I understand the inherent desire to make things more clear, but there are things about the U.S. currency that makes it less necessary to have numerals imprinted on them compared to other countries' currencies: ...


5

I'm trying to avoid regular numeric keyboard input, both to make it more immersive, and also faster and easier to use. For the claimed I suggest re-think interaction when it's possible. Let's think of army. There is a little sense in army of 1 man or 66 ones. Also it's too fuzzy distinction between army of 1000 men and the one with 1002. In terms of a ...


4

You're asking for a method to enter accurate information without having to take the time to enter accurate information. As much as that would be a lovely thing each require ment is at odds with the other. If you want quick and dirty information, then you can enter it quickly with a slider or something like that. But if you're looking for an accurate ...


4

Short answer: Yes, I believe this is indeed good practice. Mind that the decimal sign (possibly depending on localization settings) or a negative sign might also be regarded as correct input. Also check out this article: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/apps/aa511451.aspx#passwordsAndPINs especially the part about "Incorrect character".


4

Client-side validation can be helpful, but you need to be very careful how you implement it; it's easy to make it unhelpful to the user. For example, if you silently ignore non-numeric characters, then a user quickly typing '12.34' might not realise that the field has ignored their decimal point and accepted the text as '1234'. Another example; if you ...


4

Well if you display it as mV, at least you don't have to worry about whether to use a comma or a point as your decimal mark! (Since I would have read that as 3 thousand volts!) However, apart from the internationalization aspect, the question arises - At what point do you determine that V becomes more appropriate than mV? For example why is 3789 mV ok and ...


4

There's a lot of research about how people understand numbers. In general, you can group these questions under the concept of numeracy (that is, the human ability to define and apply simple numerical concepts; it's essentially literacy for numbers). Language has a profound effect on numeracy. For example, research shows that there are some cultures ...


4

You would have to test with your audience, but I would opt for symbols where they are clear to most people. For anything numerical, X > Y is clear. I can't speak for all cultures, but I covered this in grade 4 at school, so I would assume the majority of people have at least this level of mathematical understanding. I would also opt to do the same for ...


4

As far as the Royal Mint is concerned, they are reported as saying (with my emphasis)... It's the only work of art that every member of the general public touches every day, that is important to the nation's way of life. We had to make sure that the coin design was true to the heritage of British coins and gave fresh inspiration and modernity to ...


3

Interesting question. The only UX pattern you have for the input part, is "forgiving input". Ie, let the user enter whatever he/she wants, and try to understand what the value actually is. To do this, you must establish a set of interpretation rules and you must analyze ambiguous situations. You can, for example, trim all blank spaces without any ...


3

You need to be very careful over this kind of issue if working internationally. What is used as a thousands separator in one country - may not be used in another. I once saw a system which had been developed in Germany go horribly wrong when the English started inputting data... http://userguide.icu-project.org/formatparse For example, the number ...


3

Anyone that has gone to school in a country that uses metric units should at least have an understanding of the basics like: k = 1 thousand M = 1 million Any technical person should know the SI units prifixes Anyone that knows how to use a computer should be familiar with the terms kb, Mb, Gb, and Tb, so you should be safe into the trillions at least. The ...


3

Regardless of the mix of types of data in one table, the data type in the individual column should drive the alignment. Typical alignments (and of course, there are always reasons and ways to do differently) Text and items treated like text: Left Align (caveat: I find numbers always easiest to read rt aligned) Numbers and items treated like numbers: Right ...


3

In game scenarios specifically it provides "excitement" and a sense of "action" around something. e.g. your coin count at the end of a level. If you just saw the final static number of 37,865 it doesn't seem so cool... but if you got 15,000 for completing the level... 5,000 bonus for doing it in under X seconds... 2,500 for rescuing all 3 pandas, 1,000 for ...


3

The answer is quite simple. This kind of data ("number of users", "number of posts", "number of sales" etc.) are used as social proof to drive sales/sign ups to your product. It is much easier to trust something that is used by millions of people, right? For example Tumblr emphasizes the most crucial data for their micro-blogging platform, the number of ...


3

Ascenders and descenders of lowercase letters make them easier to differentiate than the blocky shapes of uppercase letters. The same is true when applied to groups of letters as they form words and blocks of text. And is also true when applied to numbers. The string of text you've shared looks especially awkward as it includes a mix of symbols '/', codes ...



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