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120

Screen digits are right aligned to maintain positional consistency between what a number represents (in base 10 that would be units, tens, hundreds, etc.). E.g. If I were to have 764 and then multiply it by 24, the answer would be 18336. By aligning to the right I've consistently seen the same unit representation in the same position, and when I've had new ...


44

I came up with another way to handle this scenario which is more clear in cases with arbitrary jumps. 1. Show links below the text input to quickly convey how the bidding system works by listing valid choices which can be chosen with a single click right from the start. 2. Update valid choices as the user types or clicks The user can either type 68 or ...


32

Digits are right aligned for similar reasons as you would right align them in a spreadsheet or a table. i.e. when you see multiple numbers (and they all have a fixed set of decimal places), then it's easier to compare the numbers with each other because the digits corresponding to each place value are in the same physical position, thus making it easier to ...


31

Well, I guess there is a maximum number of miles someone can travel in a year, since there are a finite number of seconds in year, and one cannot exceed the speed of light. A more practical limit may be 1000 miles every three days, which would be about 100,000 miles in a year. I suggest using a normal slider but with a logarithmic scale. i.e. equal spaced ...


30

I've always been enamored at the way the iOS quicktime application works when viewing MP3s in Safari, and I think this method can be adapted for your use. We can stay with a normal slider bar - perhaps the handle could be changed from the normal circle to show a difference. We can add tick marks to the bar and numbers that change on either end. Then, ...


30

The short answer to the high level UX question here is -- it depends -- so here are a few cases why a company like discourse might choose to put click counters next to their hyperlinks along with things to watch out for... I'm new here what does everyone else click? Sometimes when I visit a new restaurant I'll ask the waiter what most people order. This ...


29

I recently was playing around with a new type of pager control that only uses numbers and doesn't require any localization (next, previous, last, first, all function without any words required in the UI) I modified it slightly to work in your case here. The idea is to be really clear to the user up front that they can't just type anything they want because ...


25

Old style figures are used in titles and paragraph text. According to Fonts.com old style is suitable for title and paragraph text due to the fact that this gives the text uniform look. The 'modern' style numbers should be used for tables and graphs, since these modern numbers align better when used in these contexts. There are fonts that support both old ...


22

Line numbers need to be countable. It is more intuitive to start counting at 1 instead of 0, because 0 (say: zero) means none, not one. Looking at a coffee mug on your table, you would not answer the question of how many mugs there are by saying: "Zero" - because that would imply no mug at all is on your table. Thus with line numbers, and almost every other ...


21

Consistency is key here I think. So, for currency, always use two decimals and align every number to the right. It took me some time to make sense of the table you displayed in your post. I would go for something like this: tender qty amt 5.00 1 5.00 10.00 1 10.00 100.00 1 100.00 0.05 1 0.05 0.10 1 ...


21

One interesting solution that hasn't been proposed yet is a sort of "odometer" that the users could set to the desired number. This would have the benefits of preventing users from having to scroll through smaller numbers to get to larger ones, allowing users to be as precise as they wish, and being as simple as plain text entry without messing with a ...


17

Kontur is correct. But I would also like the add that Arrays in programming start at 0 for a very specific reason. This is not because the number in an array is supposed to 'count' the amount of elements, but instead it is considered an offset value, and thus array[0] merely means that the specific entry is 0 memory positions away from the start of the array ...


16

According to, literally, the first result when you google discourse click count, Jeff Atwood defends the click counter as a valuable signal for users to determine if a link is worth clicking: The purpose of links is to be clicked, their entire existence is predicated on being clicked at some point, and showing the click data gives you, THE READER, ...


13

I like to compare old-style numbers to lowercase, and new-style to capitals. Some typographers even talk about 'lowercase' and 'uppercase numbers'. To my eyes, using UPPERCASE in the middle of a sentence seems odd, also when using numbers in the text. old-style numerals just 'flow' better with the rest of the lowercase letters in a sentence. When available, ...


12

4 digits is time-tested chunking for large numbers 3 to 4 digit chunks are easy to read accurately. Perceptually, the eye tends to read words and not letters across a page, and a 3-4 letter word allows the eye to read the end points and the middle letters of the word accurately without disorientation. Once the word gets too long, the letters in the ...


11

If you leave out the delimiter, then you also remove all doubt related to thousand-separator vs comma separator. Many countries use comma as decimal separator, so "10,000" could be interpreted as "10 comma 000". I believe it depends on the circumstances. In general, the delimiter would increase readability, but sometimes the actual, exact number isn't ...


10

Try doing a google search on calendar icon and then you capture the results (if worth it). Just by skimming the results I saw that 9 was a popular number, but not far from others. From the Semiotics perspective 31 might work, as people easily identify it as the maximum number of days a month can get, and design-wise is filling. I think that only having the ...


10

I don't have any data about this question, neverthless here my thought: Readability is much better for right aligned numbers. Why? Consistency. The Decimal points always stays at the same location, decimal separators too. So it is much easier for a user to identify how big a number is. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq ...


9

Yes, I would say that you should only accept characters appropriate to the field. If it's a phone number, you should also accept characters like: ()-+. However, you should let the person know that an invalid key was pressed rather than do nothing. Otherwise you may end up frustrating them. Examples include: a small error message that pops up next to the ...


8

Yes. English text is usually left-aligned. Numbers are normally aligned so that the various places (unit, tens, etc.) are in columns. If the numbers are integers, this just means right-aligning the numbers. If they have decimal fractions, then the decimal places should be aligned, with the units digits all in a vertical line. This makes it easy to compare ...


8

The U.S. Mint is responsible for designing coins and bills, so I contacted them for an answer. No answer yet, but I'll keep you guys posted. :-) I understand the inherent desire to make things more clear, but there are things about the U.S. currency that makes it less necessary to have numerals imprinted on them compared to other countries' currencies: ...


8

Jørn's answer is pretty complete. Just to support it, and add a bit: It is easier to read numbers with delimiters - significants and scale are easily recognised that way. In the printed publishing world the delimiter ambiguity is solved by the use a half space character as a delimiter; on the web the same is known as thin space ( ). Like so: ...


8

When using right aligned numbers you must note that decimal separators are aligned only if there are equal amount digits after decimal separator: 12 345,90 132 987,9376 Aligning such numbers left would probably be even worse, so in cases where number of digits after decimal separator are not equal numbers should probably be aligned by decimal ...


7

Back to the question where the answer is yes, it improves readability, at least if you listen to Jakob Nielsen who (yet again) wrote an article on 113 Design Guidelines for Homepage Usability where #112 says: 112) Use a thousands separator appropriate to your locale for numbers that have five or more digits. For example, in the United States, fifty-three ...


7

You should add a check box that indicates that the number of things are limited. (Thus: An unchecked box indicates that there are unlimited number of items). download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


7

Reading @Henrik Ekblom's comment about circular controls reminded me of how the Timer app works on Android phones (image below is from the Timely app). You can add as many minutes/hours to the timer as needed by continuing to drag the cursor in a circle around the clock. Obviously the circular format works a lot better for clock-like functions, and it could ...


7

I suggest you replace the slider with a dial by removing the thumb indicator and adding arrowheads on either side so it looks something like this: I use a program at work that uses a similar dial to control frequency during an online simulation, and I've never seen anyone get confused with it. Here's the interface:


7

Switch them around, and stick to plural: Whilst "1 Errors" looks rather clumsy, "Errors: 1" is ok. Errors 0 Errors 1 Errors 2 ... (Drawback is that the list of numbers is harder for the eye to scan in a table)


7

In HTML5, the input element supports the step attribute. Example: http://jsfiddle.net/yhffroa1/ However, not all browsers support it yet. IE in particular doesn't have spinner buttons for <input type="number">, and mobile browsers don't respect step at all. There is also the pattern attribute that applies the :valid/:invalid pseudoclasses as ...


6

Early languages like FORTRAN had the first element of an array starting with 1, and it was weird when C came along to use 0. That's only natural to you youngsters. FORTRAN started with 1 because it was natural to number things in a list starting with 1. C started with 0 because it was a language deliberately written to be close to the hardware, whereas ...



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