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4

Great question! This is a very common design pattern and it's one that sites screw up all the time (IMO!). Usually the objective is: Ensure the user sees the notification. Allow the user to get on with using the site smoothly after that. Don't p*ss off your users. This seems simple, but implementations often break the objectives! For example: Model ...


1

On iOS the background of the status bar is the same color as the navigation bar (iOS 7+). Or to be more correct, the status bar has a transparent background, and the content of the app covers the screen area under the status bar. Since the menu in Gmail (and often in apps in general) has another color, it looks weird to have the status bar with a completely ...


3

This is where UX and marketing will come into conflict with each other. The marketing people will correctly claim that it tends to measurably improve revenue, while the UX people will correctly claim that causes potential clients to either leave a site or builds a poor association with the company, which lowers revenue. So how can they both be correct? In ...


1

First, you can think about the psychology of forming habits (Nir Eyal, BJ Fogg's model) that explains that triggering an action into somebody's mind increases the chances of conversion. If you remind people, they are more likely to visit your website. Secondly, I want to quote the study by Freedman and Fraser (see ref below) that explains how people first ...


0

As long as the process is just a few seconds, I think you can handle it this way: User clicks "submit" to add a new tenant Show a loading modal with a message "Adding your tenant" (or something similar) with a little animation (as long as it is just a few seconds, you don't need to show the details of the process) After the tenant is added to the system, ...



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