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As per the Android guidelines, for every application installed the Play store or Web interface shows a dialog with all permissions that the application will use. By accepting this, you are providing the app permissions to use Push notifications in your application. There is no explicit confirmation made from user like as in iOS. However if you wish the user ...


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When you download an application from google play it gives you a list of app permissions that are needed. When you continue with the download and installation of the app you essentially agree to let the app use these permissions. Apps typically have a config section where users will be able to control things such as the amount/type of push notifications ...


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There are some variables that you could take into account here to express time: "Shapes" getting smaller Seconds (numbers) decreasing Color Maybe you don't need to use all that variables, but I made a mockup with all of them to get the idea. BTW "wait" and "close" are the first words that came to my mind, but since I'm not a native English speaker, you ...


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Gaming popups have some different constraints For many games, notifications/notices are challenging to design because the user will be focused on the core game play: So, designing notifications is difficult because you have to make sure the user sees the notification, but it cannot be so intrusive that it takes the user's focus away (in space or time) ...


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A simplified approach can be as follows download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups This would show the user how much time is there for the popup to close and also enable him to prevent it from closing as well. The close icon on the top right enables him to dismiss even before the timer runs out as well. This said, I am ...


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Conciseness is key Conciseness is definitely important particularly when it comes to notifications.this being said you can still follow a progressive disclosure approach whereby you can show the user more relevant information and action points as they dig deeper. Conveying action You can convey when user action is required using emphasis, hierarchy ...


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Start with the purpose of the notification.... Usually, notifications are created to inform the user that something has happened. Therefore, the primary UX goal is to convey that information. Usually, getting the user to take action (e.g. reply, dismiss, approve) is a secondary UX goal, because it's hard for the user to take action without first reading ...


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More than the wording, make sure the notification itself is clear enough. If this is a really important part of your app, I'd load a dialog box when the user enters the page, requiring an action. So, something like this: But of course, if this is not THAT important, then you can leave a notification icon in your menu or actions bar


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Users have gotten used to the fact that a notification is clickable, so based on that I don't think you need to add text like "click here to answer Tom". Users expect a notification to be clickable by default, so "Tom posted a new comment" should be enough.


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Some suggestions for showing 'Temporary notification window' 1. Time should be sufficient so that a normal person can read whole message. 2. Message should not go off when user is keeping his/her mouse pointer on that, it shows user is focusing on this. 3. When window gets disappear, it should be in fading kind of slow animation not abruptly. 4. message ...


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I'm surprised that no one has flagged this as an accessibility concern. I recommend that you avoid having timed messages at all because you can't determine how long it takes for someone to not only read the message but also understand it. Recommendation: Include a "Dismiss" button to allow users to close the alert in their own time. Source: ...


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Don't inform them The features being removed are not used by anyone today. Providing a notice to users that you are removing them is likely to create more confusion than clarity: you're informing users that you're removing a feature they don't use and may never have heard of. If you've got your 0% usage metrics right, you can remove the features and add ...


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If you have a blog for the website that would be one way of getting the information out there. That would probably be enough if it is, as you are saying, only about 0.01% of the users that use the functionality you're removing. To be really sure that the users have got the information you could send a newsletter with the information. The top bar ...


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You could make a top bar on the page with a notice saying "we made some changes to search, learn more" or say "we made search faster, learn more". Make a little blog post about why you made the changes you did and link "learn more" to it. Make sure the top bar has a close icon that can remove the notice, once people have read it. This way if people are ...



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