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Terrible design This is a terrible design (and it doesn't even function properly - when you hit back the main content slides are mis-positioned within the scrollable viewport - and that's on Chrome!). Navigation Navigation is a user triggered action, and the back button provides the opposite action. Clicking on a link or a button is a singular action and ...


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It depends on the colors used in the rest of your website, the mood you're trying to achieve, the content you're presenting, etc. Contrast In general you should aim to have a lot of contrast between the navbar and the rest of the page, so that users can find it easier. This is what Stack Exchange does, the blue navbar contrasts heavily with the ...


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Representing the entire site schema in one page is a bit like search, as mentioned above, or an old-style site map page. Is this meant to be a guide to the site, or working sitewide navigation? If it's the latter, you could display the top levels (0-4) in the mega-nav and the lower levels in section nav. If the sections are really deep, you might want a ...


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Both the options are good but Tree navigation is recommended. My suggestion would be add the search box above the tree navigation to access the menu item quickly. User can type 3 letter in the search box to get the respective page link.


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From the 2. the tree navigation option seems the better choice. I'd add accordion behaviour(expand/collapse) to the navigation so unused elements of the menu will be hidden. Also, having breadcrumbs will give the user a sense of where they are on the application. You could also have selectable elements in the breadcumbs to allow the user to jump between ...


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Consider yourself lucky to get such a challenge! I had a stint of time when I was designing mainframe applications - it was quite a shock to have to go from graphics to text-based interfaces, but it forces you as a designer to really focus on the core aspects of design. A few things I've found useful in CLIs: Easy way to access help for commands, ...


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Depends, depends, depends... First off, a question: what are your users familiar with? People raised on DOS might have been used to quite different UIs than the ones used to OS/400 or Bloomberg console. Each TUI has its own design paradigms. IBM developed a standard called Common User Access, which might help you. (BTW, purely from a visual perspective, ...


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Does it need to be CLI only? Most of the time, a CLI is best implemented as a power-user feature of a more learnable GUI application. That eases the learning curve for the command-line phobic (a pretty large user base), and those seeking extra awesomeness can speed up what they've learned about your app by activating the CLI. A few precedents we can learn ...


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Although I don't know what the end state of all of these steps is but my assumption is that there would be a CTA to finish the process. If so you can just use that as the final click after step 1..> finish


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Do you have to show the number of steps for a single step process? Surely you only need the user to recognise a multi-step process when it IS a multi-step process - ie when there are 2 or more steps. My recommendation would be to abandon the single step indication all together.


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I believe you should go back to the previous page/step and go with the second option, where the user is notified the purchase has been cancelled and give him the option to go back and try again (they might have chosen to click back to correct something, so they'd expect the operation to be cancelled/paused). but take these things in consideration: During ...


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Simply make the bar 100% height. If you have 12 icons you can just-about-get-away-with-though-I-shouldn't-recommend-it making them expand to fill the available screen space. 1/12th of a 4 inch screen (75% of current users have 4+ inch, and that includes somewhat older phones) gives you 7.33²mm squares. Windows Phone recommends to use 7²mm squares but ...


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The vertical icons idea is fine, but you need to take care of an indicator showing that there are more icons hidden below the fold. Here are some possible solutions: Use semi transparent gradient on the bottom of icons list Position the icons so that last one is cropped in the viewport When user opens the app, auto scroll the icons list from the bottom to ...


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Let's just say that gestures are not very practical to begin with as they have to be memorized or taught. This add a lot of cognitive load to the user. Another thing to consider is why do you need to have this? Is the menu really that elaborate? Or did the app/site lost its focus to what goal it intends to serve? I'd suggest to limit the menu items and ...


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I agree with the points stated by @JonBee, but I think the main difference lies in the options (content) we are showing to the users, and the purpose of an App or a PC. Usually, we give our mobile users content to consume as soon as they get into our app, so they don't have to wonder what to do... they just start consuming what's on the screen -plus, they ...


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One of the critical piece that made the Start button work was a sustained, ubiquitous, multi-million dollar ad campaign. It would be hard to understate the effect of this on users' ability to understand the Start button.


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While there are quite a few similarities between the Start menu used in Windows and a hamburger menu, I'd say there are a few key differences in their execution. Amount of Content One of the biggest arguments against hamburger menus is the amount of navigation friction they introduce. Usually these menus contain a small number of buttons or functions that ...


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Going by the limited information we have, I assume that we are talking about something along the lines of a "planned transaction" form, where there are three actions: Primary Action 1: Authorize will actually cause the transaction to happen Primary Action 2: Reject will prevent the transaction from happening Secondary Action: Cancel will NOT have an ...


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If that's a responsive design, you will probably move the sidebar into a collapsed panel. In such case, tabs or accordion in the rightside content area are actually a better idea than trying to fit them into the sidebar. Consider such flow: User opens sidebar User chooses object Sidebar is automaticaly collapsed User sees the chosen object and already ...


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Test, don't guess The question is: will your users find the navigation if it is not in a standard place? The only way to know for sure is to test. A/B testing (of two prototypes) would be ideal for this. Consistency Will you have a large image on the top of every single content page? If not, where will your navigation be on those pages? Is the navbar ...


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This is a bad idea. Xabre is right that this makes interfaces more confusing for new users. However, it also harms usability for experienced users. A menu item that is visible can be reached in a single action. When a menu item is hidden, I have to: Stop and think where the item is hidden. Click on the menu to open it. Once the menu is open, find the ...


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That's a clear "NO", as it lowers the discoverability of the system you're trying to make. Design-wise it may look sexy to really minimize it untill nothing's left, but to me it just adds to the confusion. It also seems pointless to add another step which just "gets in the way of doing my job". But hey, don't take my word for it: ...


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Considering mobiles the experience can be very different, with more devices with large screens a top nav could be very difficult to reach. Regarding desktop I like to break standard rules and be more creative with disruptive new experiences. Very good point regarding an user testing, A/B testing.


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not sure if it's what you meant but it seems like the client pretty much wants the whole sitemap on the navigation. one problem is there might be too much scrolling and the user will be overwhelmed every time they want to navigate the app and they will have to look thru all the links each time. this however depends on the size of the app. maybe the best ...


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There's no real "logic" to it. It's more of a process. Identify all the visual changes possible: change foreground color change background color add/change outline add/change underline or any combination of the above. (You can also change sizes of things, but that is problematic so I generally avoid that. It's possible to do right, but complicated.) You ...


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Hover states afford click-ability and hence it's suggested that the hover color should be noticeable. In general, a contrast to the background color will help you achieve this desired effect. You can see an example on this site itself: The hover color is in accordance with the triad scheme for the base color. There are some more technical guidelines ...


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Let me first set out a few things that make it easier to respond to your question. Hover. The purpose of a link's or command's hover response is to signal or enhance its affordance, or perhaps to indicate its pliancy—its willingness or receptiveness to action such as the dropping of a dragged object. The pointer on a computer screen is a proxy for our ...


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The multi-select list is always uncomfortable to use - it doesn't naturally show that it is capable of multiple selection. I would stick to single selection when clicking on the campaign names and add a checkbox to the right of each item in the list. At the top of the column of checkboxes I would add the title "Compare". This means that the user can click ...


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You should not do this for a couple of reasons: first, as has been said before, users are used to clicking on the logo to go to the home page. This phenomenon called baby duck symptom means that users stick to things that they already know. Changing where the logo links would also be a violation of the "Consistency and Standards" Heuristic. (Users should not ...


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It's better to be consistent in the Master-Detail pattern and display the detailed info on selecting the item in the master panel. You can use Add to Compare and Compare Campaigns features for the item. It will be obvious for users.


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Have you thought about simply providing a separate 'compare mode'? Checkboxes seem like a way to really identify which ones you want to compare. If I wear my 'user' glasses, I'd probably want to read something about the campaign before I decide to compare it with another one; in webshops I'm used to see some sort of "compare" button, which allows me to ...


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You have raised a good point but linking logos to "Home" page is more like a convention now. For a better user experience it would be advisable to link it to the home page because you don't want your user's to think hard while using your website. The flow of the actions should be smooth.


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Notwithstanding the familiarization aspect from almost every other website, linking to the about page has a couple of serious issues. Firstly, if you link it to the about page, then you still need a link to the important home page. So now you need another prominent home logo or home menu item. This would add clutter, complexity and potentially confuse. ...


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I think its more like 'trained behaviour', repeat a pattern enough until it is accepted, kinda like the hamburger icon. (although it provides lower discoverability, it has its place it the world. Another way of looking at it, is that the landing page is in part the about page: looking at the home page should definitly give you clues of the information ...


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The challenge here is that you are using a limited-view carousel for a full-on product catalog view. These are two somewhat contradictory things. If it were just a carousel, I think what you have is fine. But it looks like it's set up for users to filter, sort, and jump around. In those situations, seeing only 3 items at once isn't all that useful to a ...


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Only a slight adaptation of your sketch. Here's a very rough mockup: A regular 16x9 screen can hold 3 ISO format pages (A4, A5, etc) side by side. Browse at 4 speeds: click flip button, >, move over 1 page. click miniature page, move over 1 to 11 pages. click skip button, >>, move over 23 pages. click end button, >|, move to last page. If a button is ...


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Smashing magazine published a nice article about AB testing best practices and a link to calculator of audience you need to ensure your results are statistically significant. Check these links: http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2010/06/the-ultimate-guide-to-a-b-testing/ https://vwo.com/ab-split-test-significance-calculator/



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