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There are many scenarios where a few advantages will deviate and converge as disadvantages. The infinite scrolling and lazy loading is technically a great combo and bonhomie idea. To continue further with stats and research findings, I 've linked a few articles Endless scrolling saves people from having to attend to the mechanics of pagination in browsing ...


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Just to extend Mervin's answer. Via navigation - sometimes Bear in mind that users don't always reach a page via the navigation - sometimes they get there from a search engine or a link from another website. If such is the case the in-page heading serves as a bolder, more obvious cue of "where am I?" than the navigation items. (There is a bit of catch 22 ...


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There are a couple of reasons why the navigation is being repeated in the examples you gave Taking the first example,while the navigation does help inform the user, the large heading helps establish the context for the page as he scans the content and the user will not be forced to look at the navigation to figure out where he is. Taking the second ...


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I'm not sure if it's an exact answer to your question, but: yes, there exist some research on that users are more likely to discover more content, especially when the users are engaged in "time-killing" activities, according to NNGroup (who base their content on user research): Continuous scrolling is advantageous for content that streams constantly and ...


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But the navigation isn't at the top. iOS 7 Android 4.4


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Through hierarchy and natural reading habits, we always read things from the top, which is generally where a website's title and menus are. With respect to your question, menu buttons are still at the top, even for many mobile apps, regardless of convenience, but strictly due to hierarchy. Home, settings, etc, you always look for at the top. This is not ...


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Could you use an initial prompt when you choose to create the document, and split that dialog in two sections - those that are available in this location and those that aren't? But still give them feedback / info about how they can create the documents they want. Something like this perhaps? download bmml source – Wireframes created with ...


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A user should be able to create a document anywhere in your system. Declaring its type is totally fine, as is it auto-filing the document. Assuming that to be true, after the user picks the type and saves the document, show a temporary notification in the UI acknowledging the system saved the document with a link to where it filed location. Another thing ...


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Good question! While I don't have any knowledge about relevant research, I think that having a button stuck to the bottom screen is not the best option. Here is my rationale: Button takes valuable space that could instead be taken by product information. Product information is critical for users to make purchasing decisions. It could be annoying to have ...


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Booking.com has now published new results from their own A/B testing concerning the hamburger menu. They already use a hamburger menu and replaced this in a test with a new Icon explicitly stating [Menu]. We ran that experiment against our whole user base, and given the prominence and omnipresence of this UI element, it didn't take long for this change ...


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Here are a couple of alternatives I could think of : An alternate option you can look at is the overflow menu option as shown below This would allow you to stack the additional content in an overlay which can be pulled up as needed and would not be the primary navigation but more like the secondary navigation. Dropbox provides a whole list of options ...


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The English example above isn't a "menu" - it's a numbered list of arbitrary foods arranged alphabetically. It wouldn't make sense as a "menu" in a restaurant even in English. A customer who wants a sandwich would likely be confused/frustrated trying to find all the various sandwich options scattered alphabetically across the page. Since people don't tend ...


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Since it is a menu, you can group the dishes by the way they are cooked. If you have different menu for breakfast/lunch/dinner, you can order the the menu by the types first and then the way they are cooked. It may be better to keep the popular ones at the top, and mark them as popular, so more customers will order them. In my opinion, you don't necessary ...


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It depends if the test homepage is created on the same domain. If it is not, then yes, the links would be considered external links. I would either create a call-to-action style homepage that only offers a user a few unique options that directs them to specific pages on the original site, then monitor the user flow through analytics to get an idea of where ...


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I think it depends on the type of restaurant, the type of customers and the variety of dishes that you have. Some of the reasons why these are important considerations are: You can order by the cost if people are price conscious/sensitive You can group and order by the type of dishes (e.g. breakfast, lunch, dinner, all-day, entree, dessert items) if the ...


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As I saw your english menu I don't see a point of sorting in Chinese word. So you could simply put the words in ordering of their meaning in english. One more thing if their was a category too then you could have arranged your food item category wise similarly Chinese words would be categorised in that way. Rest your phonetic order sounds good.


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After giving this question some thought , I would arrange the chinese words according to its Hanyu Piyin which is the official phonetic system for transcribing the Mandarin pronunciations of Chinese characters into the Latin alphabet Example of Hanyu Piyin


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Rather than doing a vertical expansion of items, perhaps try a more layer-based approach could help simplify. Rather than showing a long list of items, you could showcase a "stack" of sorts which allow the user to track where they were while seeing the options relating to their selection. View an example: ...


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well, for portfolio you could obviously use a typical porfolio/briefcase icon, but hear me out on this: I am assuming your portfolio is about a creative service, probably design, right? Why not go for something creative? I mean, none of those icons tells me nothing, and as a matter of fact if they tells me something, is that you didn't worry very much ...


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Why not stick with the names and avoid using the icons there? No matter which icons you pick, you'll never achieve the descriptiveness of the text.


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I would definitely NOT remove the link from the menu. It sends a very confusing message to the user, and has no indication whatsoever as to your current whereabouts in the navigation tree. That being said, I would disable the link functionality, as it would load the same page again, and unless it's a real-time or dynamic page you wouldn't want that (and ...


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I recommend the shorter form option. Once I submitted a very long form, the server accepting it timed out and I got a nice error page. Pressing browser back button returned an empty form for me to fill everything all over again! In a client server application:- Breaking down into simple forms also lets you save it in the server every step of the way. ...


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It's a tough one. I agree with you though, this is a necessary feature, especially in a world with such difference between people and ISPs. I'd take inspiration from the recent European Union cookie laws (if you're not familiar: websited must obtain permission before setting cookies or have an easily accessible policy). Most websites now seem to implement ...


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This PDF has some good tips for form design. This article mentions some opinions about this specific question. Previous question and another previous question. I also dislike pagination on a long news article, but that's because I'm trying to consume the content & it slows me down. When you want people to produce the content for a form you want to ...


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Get involved    |    Provide your data   |    For developers/API The first option is pretty straight forward, its like a call to action title inviting the user to actually get involved. The second option is more about asking for data politely rather than sounding rude. As far as I can see, you are asking for the ...


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ATM software is generally written by the bank, whereas ATM hardware comes from a very limited set of manufacturers like NCR. As ATM hardware improves, the same software is deployed on many different device form factors often at once; some are old-school (like the ones you refer to in the question) with the buttons running down each side of the screen, and ...


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Buttons down the edge are old technology and I suspect they'll all be replaced by touch screens before too long and this problem will go away.



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