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it really depends on the product. could you elaborate more what kind of product are you referring to? some products such as news portals it would make sense to have a layout that get customized to the user's preferences after the user signs it. while before signing in the user will get generic content. in this case the answer would be to keep the ux similar. ...


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The two experiences should be completely different. I say that because they target two moments of the user interaction: 1- the customer wants no understand the product, its benefits and if this meets his needs and expectations. The public site will help addressing this questions and guide the user to the purchase moment 2- the customer is now a user (i know, ...


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What is best for one site/app might not be best for yours. There really aren't any best practices. Try whatever comes natural to you. Test it. If it doesn't work, change it. Don't over think it.


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I think you should allow your breadcrumbs to show only the hierarchical view of your site , not how you reached there, which is summarized in the browser's history (at least if you made your site bookmarkable). As usability consultant Jakob Nielsen says here: Offering users a Hansel-and-Gretel-style history trail is basically useless, because it simply ...


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The more you can lose design elements that doesn't provide value to the reader, the better. Vertical and horizontal lines, fat headers with disturbing colours or boxes without meaning. If you can work with negative space (a.k.a White Space) for clarity you make your news site easy on the eye and less stressful to brows through where content stand out ...


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Without knowing what kind of a news site you are developing and without understanding what kind of an audience you want to draw/keep and making assumptions for the same, I would cautiously suggest a combination: - With Example 2, you are able to let the content be the star by taking away any visually distracting elements of the page. - With Example 3, you ...


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My main concern with your approach is scalability. How many pages of search results will there be? Consider how scroll bars work, and see if your solution will scale as well as they do. To use an example, let's assume we're using Microsoft Word on a desktop computer without a touchscreen. When scrolling through a long document, you have a lot of ...


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I do it like this The ↻ is for refresh the current page first ⇚10 ⇐ ↻ ⇒ 10⇛ last


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Keep the arrows for increment by 1, use a slider that increments by 10 for quicker navigation. Once the value in slider is selected the values above readjust accordingly. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


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After doing further research (greatly helped by learning the industry-adopted terminology for these issues), I have gathered information that seems to support my hypotheses. I will list the main issues along with my findings. It is often confusing to blend object based (i.e. "Current Year Tax Documents") and task based (I.e."Complete Tax Organizer") ...


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This will be confusing for most users, the arrow is commonly used to go back 1 page or go forward 1 page, i think it is indeed better to say something like +10 or -10 if you really want a user to be able to jump 10 pages. However as discussed in the following thread it's most likely not needed for users to be able to jump a certain amount of pages. ...


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Sometimes you can't backup things with data, because noone had this special problem or those people are not here... So if this should be true, I suggest making a design bet out of it and run an A/B-Test, seeing if there are problems when you have it on top nav or not. Possible measurments might be support tickets regarding this issue, task completions or ...


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In your example, you could have buttons for page 1 and page 25. Perhaps add ellipsis in between to emphasize the gap. Here's a close example:


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The first issue is, which x does what? You have two "x" icons which may do the same thing, but perhaps not. If they do the same thing - why do you have two? If they don't do the same thing - you're using the same icon to do two different things! My concern is that a user may hit the "X" when they intended to hit the arrow, accidentally clearing their ...


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Yes. I'd consider having a separate header bar for the X to close the window and / or moving the dropdown arrow closer to the labels Putting the default at the top of the list does carry the risk that the user might miss seeing that there are values above the default.


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The solution will be to look at how desktop apps do undo processes. Desktop software does undo and redo very well in many cases. Say I open a Word document, or a photoshop file, and I make some edits. At any given point I can use the undo or redo functions to move backwards and forwards through a sequence of snapshot states taken by the application as I ...


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I had a similar situation where business requested to show a button with Login and register with one action. I do understand that its not best practice and user may get confuse here with double action with one button. Also, we have provide a separate link for register. See below screen which may help you in your scenario to create My profile link for ...


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The term Sign In can be used for both actions. It's also a good term if you're providing additional Sign In options like Facebook, Twitter or OpenId, as "Sign in using Facebook" doesn't imply the burden of a (possibly lenghty) registration process.


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I wonder if; 'My Account' Could work here. Users with an account will easily identify where to log in and it also could communicate account creation to those who don't have one. Hope this helps


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You should use a "more" button to provide additional menu options. You should also really look at your navigation structure and figure out why you need so many options! 8-10 seems overly excessive. Apple: The iOS Human Interface Guidelines call out a minimum button size of 44x44 pixels, which equates to roughly 7mm. Pushing a left/right button onto the ...


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On Android the design guidelines specify a navigation drawer for your situation, if you use fragments instead of activities there will not be a performance issue. If you are really dead set against navigation drawer, then I would just go with the standard on iOS, which is no more than 5 tabs, with the fifth tab being a more tab if necessary. (I would use ...


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I would go for the scrolling tab bar, assuming you can swish left or right, with 10 items this would allow the user to access menu items more quickly than pressing right 3 times to get to the 10th item.


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I don't think it is possible to give a 'correct' answer, as such thing depends on many variables. For example, do users enter the site in explorer mode, or in task-completion mode? Anyhow, analytics data such as Average Time on Page (ATOP)can give some guidance for this ratio - the larger the ATOP is, the larger should be the content area. The existence ...


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It depends on your type of application/website you are delivering; Structuring the Navigation with content is very important process in IA. You have to categorize the goal as primary and secondary to display the navigation+content. If you can achieve your goal through displaying 70% content area then why not to use that theme. I would say there is no ...


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In this case, convention is on your side. Users inherently expect that they will find navigation on the left or top of a site. By employing contrasting background colors and other emphasis techniques, you can keep your navigation satisfyingly small and users will still have little to no problem finding it. You can look at this very page for an example. The ...


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Do you mean "pogoing" or "pogosticking"? "We can define pogosticking as the average number of product detail pages viewed on your site, divided by the number of unique search queries ... " http://www.uxmatters.com/mt/archives/2009/06/search-results-satori-balancing-pogosticking-and-page-relevance.php


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It's quite common in analytics and SEM to distinguish between unique events and a total number of events. As you're obviously tracking conversions (please note that a conversion doesn't always have to be a sale), I'd go with the term "Unique Conversions" to track the amount of different users that completed the funnel. "All Conversions" would give you the ...


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I can tell that you're an iOS user. Android users are conditioned by the OS to explore. Android users will also understand that "Login" and "Register" are not just random words on the screen, but two actions they may choose to execute. Notice how google does not use anything in particular to make their settings items appear touchable: The reason why ...


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I would suggest an Expandable List View in addition to tabs: So, you'd use the tabs to let the user select the section, and represent the subsections with group headers in an ExpandableListView. Now, if your data does not lend itself to this kind of segmentation, I'd suggest a section landing page, or default to one and let the user change it in the ...


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For the main sections you could use a spinner navigation in the Action Bar. So the active/visible section would display as a spinner rather than a static title. The sub sections would make sense to remain as tabs as you have mocked up. This pattern is seen in many apps including a few Google ones. Spinners ...


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Rather than explicitly using another icon - which may be easy to miss - I'd suggest also changing up the colour scheme a bit, i.e. make the nav bar a different shade, or include a highlighted border around the profile icon which changes colour when logged in vs not. PS. Hamburger menus are still contextual, so there are cases in which they should exist.


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Take a look at your OS building blocks for tabs. Personally, if I had to use tab navigation that's the way I would choose. General rule, your navigation should be consistent throughout your apps. Benefit: your user will know right away how to interact with your navigation. Android : http://developer.android.com/design/building-blocks/tabs.html iOS : ...


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I wrote a huge answer, deleted it and got to the point: sub-header Mixing navigation styles isn't a good idea, you will likely confuse your users. The key to good navigation is a clear structure and consistent behaviour, so if you can try to make it as simple and easy for your users then you'll find that they will appreciate it more. Same thing with ...


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I basically agree with Benny Skogberg's answer. However I think it would also be safe to display a "Do you really want to abort the search?" confirm message, but only if the search usually takes a lot of time. Accidental taps can be frustrating if you've been waiting minutes for a result. I wouldn't display a confirmation message if the search is trivial ...


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Yes absolutely. Every action a user takes should interrupt all other activities for several reasons: Data load. Loading data is (often) costly and we want to use as little as possible running a mobila app. Threading should be avoided. Expectations. User expect a mobile app to respond quickly at the time they do something. If you're ever used a search ...


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I also don't see a problem in such request. The amount of information (and, thus, the space it occupies) is small, so it doesn't detract users' attention. Moreover, this information doesn't represent real content - it's just some branding information. I'd advise you to reconsider your view on this non-significant issue.


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That's a fairly common request, especially if your product can be "white labeled". If clients use this externally as a service then they'll want others to perceive it as their offering. I'd question the use of both your company's logo AND the client's logo in this case.


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Using some relevant content above the main navigation bar is not a relevant problem. Lot of sites has this kind of structure. Take a look for example to Ebay where you can see this kind of layout:


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Option 1 is more explicit at informing user the limit is editable and option 2 is not as explicit as option 1 but it's still clear enough for user to understand the limit field is editable. Option 2's UI is cleaner and looks better but the difference is minor. Both would work but if I have to pick one, I would pick option 2 for your particular scenario. ...


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You can use something like ScrollSpy: See an example on the Bootstrap website. Or instead of tabs Bootstrap has the Affix menu as used on the Bootstrap website too. Here you can find some great examples too.



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