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It's fine! A quick glance through any major Android apps will show you that the menu or settings button alternates from top-left to top-right, and many other buttons go near the bottom. Aside from those standards, you can do almost anything. As long as you provide ample finger-space for the buttons (good article at Smashing Magazine), you can put buttons ...


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It is absolutely okay to have some links in top menu that open up a new tab. I work for an eCommerce websites and different application symobols take my users to their respective landing pages. make sure you open them in a different tab so that way they do not have to go back to the mail site. They can just close it. The best way is to maintain the visual ...


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You can use a mega menu to display the homepage of those websites you are talking, and open them in a different tab of course. This way users will be at least advised. Here is an example of how it can be managed


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For 3D navigation in a CAD model or landscape, you are actually talking about 6 degrees of orientation, because you've got 3 degrees of translational movement (X, Y, Z) and an additional 3 degrees to describe rotational orientation of the view. If you also include zoom in and out, that's 8 degrees. I don't really like the Autodesk widget. Problems with ...


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I'll answer the second question (what is the best 3d navigation method) as it's unclear to me whether you can freely/legally use Autodesk's cube. When the main task is manipulating an object, you want to be able to control the view in terms of perspective vs. orthogonal projection, and separately zoom/rotate/slide the object in all directions. For this ...


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I think a very similar challenge has linkedin when you are editing your profile. It gives you some visual representation of how much you have completed in your profile. To motivate you for more input, it constantly puts a prominent text box at the top of the screen, one by one, to ask for more input. For your case it does not perfectly fit due to the lack ...


1

The user story here would be: As a user, I'd like to easily locate to the next field where my action is required. Now there are many ways to satisfy this, but also quite a few assumptions being made. Visual inspection anyone? One of them, is simply by visual inspection. If you know a bit about visual cognition, you can design the interface in such ...


2

It is likely to give the content more height to work with. The various ui elements at the top and bottom of the screen, menu, address bar, favourite, other toolbar, footer, start-bar/dock and you end up with a very letter boxed view of the content. Particularly as websites depend on scrolling and don't have control of these other desktop level ui ...


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Why not just split your navigation area (like the header) in half. Left-align one brand, right-align the other brand, and have the navigation effects appear when you click on the brand's png/logo. [supersweet-cookies] <click for menu click for menu>[deliciousdank cookies] [ ...


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The menu is blank for me when i'm not in mobile mode otherwise i get the hamburger. Anyway - this is a situation where it's ok to not have it always there. Think about the following: the content of the site - you're not a social media site and your most frequent repeat visitors are going to be your own employees. That being said, when the repeat visitor ...


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Agreed with the above... whenever possible, when you have a situation like this it's nice to think of user cognitive load and reduce that as much as possible. Does it make their mind have to think? However, the times where it's ok to NOT have the primary nav go somewhere is if the action to open a drop down nav is via the click action as opposed to ...


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Should primary navigation items always link to page? Typically speaking, yes. I believe that is the best user experience and the least confusing to the user. But if you don't, see my answer to question 3 below. If they do link to a pages is it OK if those pages are just a section landing pages or summaries of the pages below them, or ...


1

I am afraid that the UX world depends on which your users are and therefore the true answer is that there are no solutions to your problem. There are only costs and benefits on choosing either one design or the other but this depends on the users. You should get in touch with them by doing ux research in order to get the proper insights that will guide your ...


4

Your intuitions have merit -- if it is confusing to you as a developer to have two menu items of the same name, rest assured that it would also be confusing to your users. In this case, the word "View" or "View All" can be used to enumerate this action, for instance: Contacts View All Additional Fields Sub Category I would also hesitate to make your ...


1

You basically have a two-level navigation hierarchy. That's not unusual. Let's start with the Mobify approach: The Mobify approach is reasonable if you want to constrain users to a single panel, or if you think users will want to jump around the hierarchy frequently so they won't have the patience for a slide-in animation. It's also useful if you want ...


1

You're trying to create what's probably the single most common mobile design pattern, namely drilldown navigation :). You're saying that when you click the arrow, the submenu slides on top of the current one, and from your mockup it appears that the top item leads back to the original menu. In other words, when you click an item, you see the list of the ...


0

This is a tricky one to answer without any further understanding of the typical scenarios and your users needs. From a user interface perspective there are lots of ways to display this information: drop down lists/multiple selects/tabs/simple links etc. See: http://ui-patterns.com/ I would focus more on research into the users/tasks, some point to consider ...


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"As always it is always best to let the user decide" I'm not totaly agree with that. It's the best way to make the user feeling indecisive. Sometime the best way to help a customer to use something is to offer him only one option (memory retention). Bloc by bloc (meaning moving the all number of items diplayed on the visible list at a time) is easier to ...


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As always it is always best to let the user decide, and offer them the option, as when scrolling on a PC, to choose a line scroll (analogous to using the cursor keys) or a page scroll (analogous to PgUp and PgDn). Each method has its merits: Line-by-Line gives the user a less sudden flash to a new environment, and it easier on the eyes. Page-by-Page ...


1

I think there are two primary reasons for this: Historical When news services started putting content online, they focused on the differentiating factors of online news services vs print services. That meant focusing on up to the minute news rather than a curated selection of news which had been chosen to give a recap of the previous day's news. ...


2

A tough question Benny. I read an article a few years ago that talked about online papers versus hardcopy papers. It didn't answer your question unfortunately however it did make this interesting quote: The paper cites other researchers on the subject who have theorized that the layout of online pages—which often insert ads mid-story or force readers to ...


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In strict UX terms, I think an in-page back button would only be a reasonable solution to navigate between pages in a single article (and, even then, I would question why the article has been broken up in that way) or a stage in a multi-page process. An alternative solution might be a breadcrumb (either historical or structural) to alert users to the ...


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I think there are the following things to consider: Does "going deeper" in a certain navigation tab result in loading a new page or does the information just load up inside of the already opened page? If it's the former, a "back"-button would result in performing the same step as the browsers' back button, making it slightly unnecessary Are your ...


3

It all depends on the app itself and users' expectations. For instance, users expect Facebook's desktop website to always show: Friend requests Their messages New notifications The other options are hidden in menus and sub-menus. So, it's a logical step for Facebook to match the desktop version with the app. If you have the screen space to place the ...


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Browser back button is not navigation tool for users to get back to the pervious screen. I an not fully understand the layout of your navigation, but the breadcrumb is always a best practice to help users get back to the previous screen.


2

An animation when opening the menu probably likely won't negatively affect the usability much (the user still knows where to click the menu and expects a menu to open). An animation does add some "delight" to the experience because it makes the transition visually smooth and it helps the user follow along with what they selected. That said, if you are ...


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I normally have a separate list of global links on a navigation map, off to one side, rather than including them on each.


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If the sections 2.1 - 2.3 is part of a global navigation (?) containing no more than seven items I would use this layout: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups I'd put the common HELP ling in a different color, making it stand out, in the Global navigation. The items looks like Local navigation visible according to ...


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Can you support auto save in this context? As long as users don't experiment with the data it would smooth the process. Make it even faster by providing a key sequence for the next button. If that would work, you can just have a status indication immediately adjacent to a 'next item' button, like the pattern illustrated below. If you need to allow undoing ...


2

The general approach tends to be "Save" and "Next". There's an implicit assumption that the wizard saves when you move onto the next step. You can probably make it more clear by showing a "saved" notification "toast" message on the screen. To be clearer, consider the following set "< Previous" "Save" "Next >"


1

From experience, consumers have come to expect digital technology to be buggy and complicated. Many have experienced the inability to get a new product to work, both at home and at work. Thus, I speculate, consumers may be reassured to see you offer support. They may be encouraged to get something knowing you’ll be there after the acquisition to help them if ...


1

According to Google's navigation guidelines, the correct behaviour for your described case of hitting back button is to return to the previous screen, which will be the previous category. They outline 3 cases for the back button. When details screens are independent and only accessible via the Hub screen This is your above case where your categories are ...


1

It depends on the app but from your description above... if the user open the app, opens the navigation drawer, selects another category I would have the hardware back button show the previous screen since the navigation categories are hidden away in a navigation drawer. 1. The control I pressed to update the screen is no longer visible. If the ...



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