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From experience, consumers have come to expect digital technology to be buggy and complicated. Many have experienced the inability to get a new product to work, both at home and at work. Thus, I speculate, consumers may be reassured to see you offer support. They may be encouraged to get something knowing you’ll be there after the acquisition to help them if ...


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According to Google's navigation guidelines, the correct behaviour for your described case of hitting back button is to return to the previous screen, which will be the previous category. They outline 3 cases for the back button. When details screens are independent and only accessible via the Hub screen This is your above case where your categories are ...


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It depends on the app but from your description above... if the user open the app, opens the navigation drawer, selects another category I would have the hardware back button show the previous screen since the navigation categories are hidden away in a navigation drawer. 1. The control I pressed to update the screen is no longer visible. If the ...


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I believe that it depends on the purpose of that button. If the user is going a whole webpage back, then the browser back button will suffice. Now a good example of using a customized back button is if the user is going to fill up a form with several steps, viewing a slideshow or browsing through articles/demos with multiple pages. As an example, you could ...


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In testing I've found that there is a split between people that use the browser back button regularly, and those that never use it. Also, remember that the browser back button takes you back in history, not back in navigation, and so isn't appropriate for navigation purposes. E.g. If someone enters a page via a shared link or bookmark, they won't have ...


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Yes URLs are a valid communication tool for both users and machines. This slideshow gives more information.http://blog.rnf.me/ux-of-urls/#/. And, fittingly, you can also head to the 29th slide to see a pertinent quote: http://blog.rnf.me/ux-of-urls/#/29 Thankfully, the slideshow automatically updates the URL with the number of the slide you are viewing, ...


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No. Most people aren't sure on this, because Neilsen's statement on the subject predates the wide-spread deployment and adoption of infinite scrolling: Yes, "return to top" can be avoided, because the exact same functionality is provided by simply dragging the scrollbar to the top of the page. It's almost always better to rely on a single, generic ...


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I'm often wary abut looking for niche, universal UX stats regarding things like this. The truth, as far as I'm aware, is that context is paramount in these decisions. Example: Squarespace - it has moved its site to a hamburger-style menus. Why? Because many it's trying to showcase its website templates in a beautiful. Would people looking for big images ...


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I can't come up with numbers but I can summarize a rationale. I agree with you. More and more people know what those 3 little lines do. But I have a different take on it. There is a reason for the hamburger menu to show up in mobile devices. Lack of screen space. Sure that has been rationlised by many commentators into saying, "we should only show what is ...


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I would say that the logic behind this design is sound from an Information architecture point of view so you are right in pointing out that: I can take a good guess as to why this is the case (reduce level of cognition, reduce choice, promote certain sub-categories). I would add that the design follows a number of Information architecture principals ...


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I vote MIXED. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Vertical only makes sense if the contents that are being displayed on the "timeline" or "newsfeed" are summarries of the stories. In other words, users need to tap on the stories to read the details (similar to Facebook). Otherwise, if you display the full stories on ...


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Related: Horizontal or vertical swiping? In this case (social network), familiarity is a very strong factor, and nowadays most visited ones have vertical swiping to navigate throw posts. Also, according to Gestalt law of continuity, if the posts are like these, the vertical swiping would suit better.


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Vertical. It seems you're coming up against the Principle of Least Astonishment, i.e. "If a necessary feature has a high astonishment factor, it may be necessary to redesign the feature." The industry has decided upon a style, and we're stuck inside that paradigm until something massive shifts it. Could it be your app? Yeah! Is it likely to be? Probably ...


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It's perfectly fine. Consistency is a very important design principle but it's not a goal in itself, it doesn't automatically trump other UX considerations. People often make the mistake of trying to be consistent at all costs, so that eventually instead of consistency working for them, they end up working for it. If your site is built in a way that doesn't ...


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Links that scroll to a different part of the page violate the mental model we have become accustom to. The problem is clearly defined here -- http://www.nngroup.com/articles/avoid-within-page-links/ The solution is usually not to do it at all because of how conditioned we are to expect links to go somewhere else and work with the back / forward buttons ...


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I have seen "back to top" links being associated with an arrow to one side. Most people will associate the up arrow with the name. e.g. There's also the notes and reference links coming from print for more formal or academic documents with * or dagger symbol to indicate a section note, foot notes where there's the implicit association that it'll take you ...


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My instinct suggests that a viral video site would be better served by tagging than categorization as a navigation metaphor. Categories are buckets into which items are placed. Tags are attributes which are assigned to an item. It is implied that an item belongs in one category while that same item might have multiple tags. If you give your authenticated ...


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Probably not the answer you wanted to hear but... Perhaps people are browsing just the womens or just the mens because the UI encourages/enforces gender binaries. I think your proposal would only increase this effect. Focusing on item/style would be much more beneficial.


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I'd present the user with a pop up on load so they can select the gender at first, like this: Want to filter options? all kid men women and remember the chosen option . Please note that I didn't use the "gender" term since it's too restrictive for some people and it makes no sense to have a "gender" for kids, or even worse, choose all for gender ...


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Vertical tabs would be the right solution. Considering the list could run longer than 30 names, you can provide a search feature on the top. This approach stands good even on a mobile device, with the list moved into a sidetray.


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I would do something like Telerik does with their PanelBar: Click the link above or the image to view the different demos.


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Why not do something like this and just make it a drop down box:


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I would recommend sidewise slide for different categories. If the user wants to see the next category, all he/she has to do is slide left. For the menu item, general slide up and down movement should be fine. I see that the menu items have description which may not be good for scrolling. In that case, I would recommend having just the dish's name ...


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I would recommend the collapsed categories, with sub category headings, for example all the Kebab's grouped under the heading "Kebabs". You could also have buttons at the top and bottom to automatically scroll one page when clicked.


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What I've learnt from web design in my three years in university is that global navigation comes first, local navigation comes second, content as number three and related links as number four. This means that option one, a skip to conten link at the top is most common and most used. From my view it's an unspoken convention. Ref: Skip navigation links


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I strongly disagree with swiping from left to right being "natural". Natural swiping is dependent on the language, as the gesture of swiping mimics turning a page in a physical book, magazine or newspaper. So the natural direction of swiping is whatever direction you would use with printed material. Swiping left to right is intuitive for most Western ...


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Because we read from left to right this means the most natural way of swiping would to bring in new content from the right. So the comment above is correct. Swipe to the left. updated by 'we' I mean the West. For other languages will be in accordance with the reading direction.


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Consider using quick-draw offscreen nav (side menu or navigation drawer). This pattern is used in Slack mobile app to access group conversations, directly contact individuals and show missed message indicators. Taking all available vertical space allows you to quickly scroll to the desired contact and keep individual links large enough to tap with less ...


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I can see a few solutions. Burger menu As suggested by others here, a burger menu could de clutter your UI as well as giving access to important features from every screen. If you put a burger menu in the upper right corner where your settings and contacts icons currently are, you can integrate both existing menus into this one new component. This makes a ...


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How about a slider above the main menu?


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I would make it clear to the user that there are two steps and that "selecting a category" is a first step and a required step. Also I would use a radio button for the category selection as it makes it clear for the user that he is actually selecting a choice (rather than just clicking and bg color changing) download bmml source – Wireframes ...


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I'm thinking it might not appeal to you because it is a bit text-heavy. You could consider adding icons or imagery to represent each category. That might also give you some different options with the layout (for example, your icon/image could be to the left or above your text). Centering the Category title above the supporting text might make it look a bit ...


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I think you should look at the need rather than the number. The number is often not very relevant. Yes 20 nav links looks crazy however it's generally a symptom of poor information architecture. If you do in fact need 20 links and they are all clearly differentiated from each other and well grouped, it can work. Your question of "do 6 options promote ...


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WHY? (always a good question to ask) Fist, the immediate issue, for me, is: Why not use a 'hamburger' or icon for saving space on small screens? Is it not needed? Is this personal preference? If it is the later then personal preference should not be the reason for design decisions. The issue may actually be a project (or expectation) management flaw. As a ...


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There are some general rules and you might know: The magical number seven, plus or minus two (George Miller, 1956) People only remember four items at once (Baddeley 1986 and Cowan 2001) Same with 3, 9, 16 and more... But those are about remember something. What we need is how much options should be available. The answer is: the less the higher the ...


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Flow would be like: User comes to x screen. Tap on link/button or any other mean to open url. Then parent will push a y controller class (having uiwebview) along with setting parameter like url which would be required for webview. Along pushing you need to add a tap gesture in your y controller( one tap or double tap detection). On tap gesture method you ...


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I can't tell for sure, but it sounds like your dealing with one of the classic issues of Enterprise level software, growth. As your solution adds features, new screens are added and existing screens are augmented with additional data entry fields and buttons. Your navigation needs grow and so does the size of many of your entry screens. Eventually, your ...


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No. My reason for saying this is simple: users do not like change. Users will know quickly that if they hover over an item on the nav bar, a dropdown menu will appear, because on so many sites before this, that is what happened. At the same time, this does not mean you should not add new things, and there is much room for improvement on the hover menu, and ...


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Is there a relationship between selecting a node and selecting its parent node? For example, if Node A has child nodes B, C and D, is it the case that selecting all of B,C and D implicitly selects A and vice versa? If so, then you don't necessarily need different click behaviors for leaf and branch nodes. Perhaps the first click on "Node A" expands it, ...


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A resturant menu contains categories and you should be more focused on those. Define categories and then let the user search in categories. Also you can provide extra feature to search among all category just by typing key words. A dynamic list should pop up from where user can select the cusine. Also he should be given a recently ordered list like a ...


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You have an application not a brochure - this can make the IA more flexible. The epicurious mobile app has a useful faceted search see top right slide In this UI user gets to choose which criteria are important to them, and supply only those before browsing key ingredients cuisines of interest courses dietary requirements So can specify a "pork & ...



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