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0

Using some relevant content above the main navigation bar is not a relevant problem. Lot of sites has this kind of structure. Take a look for example to Ebay where you can see this kind of layout:


1

Option 1 is more explicit at informing user the limit is editable and option 2 is not as explicit as option 1 but it's still clear enough for user to understand the limit field is editable. Option 2's UI is cleaner and looks better but the difference is minor. Both would work but if I have to pick one, I would pick option 2 for your particular scenario. ...


1

You can use something like ScrollSpy: See an example on the Bootstrap website. Or instead of tabs Bootstrap has the Affix menu as used on the Bootstrap website too. Here you can find some great examples too.


0

I couldn't find any public research on this a few years back. What I did was reverse engineer patterns to determine strengths / weaknesses CAD systems => 1 display for tools & others as work space Powerpoint => master & slave display Visual Studio => collection of user organised windows Gimp => one central work areas & collection of user ...


1

If you think about it, the default iOS guidelines somewhat reflects Jef Raskin's idea about zooming interfaces: As you work your way deeper into the navigation hierarchy transition animations will slide you towards right and if you move back they will slide you to the left. If there is some sort of contextual popover it will always slide in from the ...


0

I would suggest a Back icon in both scenarios. It will provide a consistent look. Also, I don't feel anything wrong with displaying a Back icon on a screen where you move through Navigation icon.


1

What you can do is have a combination of a partially fixed header along with color changing links. As you scroll down, the section links come with you. When you get to a certain section, that section's link changes color. You can see this in action atTwitter Bootstrap


1

I think your problem is mostly one of changing the keyboard focus, isn't it? Most platforms have existing shortcuts for some of these things. E.g. in pretty much every view in MacOS Finder you can use Cmd+Shift+Up-Arrow and Cmd+Shift+Down-Arrow to go one hierarchy level up or down. You could probably re-purpose that to let people move keyboard focus between ...


0

Rather than having different key combinations to navigate parent to parent (skipping children), why not just use the up and down arrows, or the tab (forwards) and shift-tab (backwards) for moving through everything in the hierarchy that is open? This will free up the key combinations. For this to work, you need a shortcut key to close and open the current ...


1

After much soul-searching and many mock-up screenshots, I have to agree with funkylaundry that more than a single button on the same side of a navigation bar looks non-standard in an iOS application. Thus, I decided to stick with Apple's idea of a functionality-bound "Add..." row inside a table view, in a separate "+" section at the bottom of it (which ...


0

Single page applications are perfect for dynamic content sites with a lot of asynchronous server communication. For small websites that serve information only, the development overhead in terms of time and cost would deem it unnecessary to build a single page application. Your decision should be on a site by site basis, keeping in mind that there is a use ...


4

Whether your product should be a one-page solution or a more traditional multi-page solution is entirely dependent on a whole lot of factors. There's no way to give this question a blanket answer. A one-page app could be designed with great UX, or terrible UX. Whether it's one page or not really has no direct bearing on the quality of the UX. Broadly ...


1

It is a bit tricky without the context - a sketch would help, but in general I would not recommend having three buttons in the navigation bar. Partly because it might take up too much space, depending on how you are planning to design the buttons and partly because it would "feel" inconsistent according to the UI guidelines. If I should choose between your ...


0

A common solution that I see is to use ellipsis, and when the mouse hovers over it, show the full text in a balloon; but this is somewhat redundant when the label already fit the navigation. Or, even better, you can temporarily widen the navigation column during mouse hover. With CSS3, it is even possible to do so without JavaScript.


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“@aj_ux: STOP PRESS: I solved the hamburger menu problem everyone pic.twitter.com/7aG2V1POa5” Everyone loves a compromise.— Jonty Sharples (@Gringomoses) June 10, 2014


1

To the right. Nearly all users have an existing mental model of where things "should" be. I wouldn't break the scroll-control-on-the-right convention unless a very specific product or user goal demanded it. If that goal is too confuse and then annoy, go for it.


2

Supporting the case for placing it on the right: Normally a user would read, or at least scan, the content before thinking about scrolling. In that scenario it would make more sense to have the scroll buttons on the right side (assuming of course that the content is being read left to right). The scroll bar position for vertical scrolling is on the right ...


3

I would simply make sure that each menu item was correctly padded/margined. If so, you'd get something more along the lines of this:


0

Honestly, you should be able to compensate fairly well by adjusting the padding in each tag. I believe margin is the distance between the and the bullet while padding is between the bullet and the . By adjusting that, you should be able to have a second line wrap properly under the first. You should also have in writing what the max character length for ...


0

That is, I believe, a very fair concern I also face very often. Almost all the time, I try to have a sub-headline in a smaller font; explaining what is under, what actions can be taken... Limiting the character count while giving tips on how to limit them will go well with that solution. Depending on the need and type of the project other solutions I can ...


1

You could be really aggressive and actually block admin users from entering titles longer than the maximum space you think they should take up. The down side is that this will make your system less flexible (there will always be genuine use cases for long titles), and create a negative experience for your admin users. Not good. Helpful hints can guide users ...


1

What I see here is pretty much a static website, with a few pages. Everything links to everything in a click or two. I don't think many people will be able to use this sitemap to help understand potential flows to various pages, so for that reason, I would leave it out or change it. If you change it, think about your goal. Who is this for? What do you want ...


10

Paddi MacDonnell wrote an interesting article on the hamburger menu and related mobile-first approaches to design a few days ago: It outlines some of the problems of hamburger menus, and concludes with the observation that the device is something of a way to brush the navigation of a complex app under the carpet of the hamburger icon (my carpet analogy, not ...


0

I'd prefer expandable and collapsible parent menu items on mobile devices. Each parent item that is expanded, automatically closes any others. This keeps the navigation compact and user friendly across mobile devices. Whether you trigger this menu via a hamburger icon or otherwise is just one option of many but at least it is a relatively known ...


0

I'd definitely opt for fewer navigation items if you can. Brent Jackson has argued aginst flyout (hamburger) navigation. The hamburger solution only really covers number 1 or the following utilities: Good navigation should do at least three things well: (1) it should allow the user to navigate; (2) it should serve as wayfinding, letting the user know ...


0

There is also this piece from 2004 (by the looks): "Eyetrack III: What News Websites Look Like Through Readers’ Eyes". http://www.poynter.org/uncategorized/24963/eyetrack-iii-what-news-websites-look-like-through-readers-eyes/


-1

I believe it's called a "scope bar" according to Apples HIG. I suppose it depends on the context in which it's used.


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If the purpose is to serve as navigation header for your site, this is called Navigation Bar. http://getbootstrap.com/components/#navbar


1

If a user takes the effort to open the in-page tab in a new tab/window, you can assume they do so because they want to read the contents later on, but are currently reading the info on the screen right now. My advice would be to open the new browser tab with the selecte in-page tab shown, while keeping the current page the way it is.


0

Apart from what has been said. If your web site is more of an application rather than a typical information site, you could additionally try to encourage your users to make a shortcut on the springboard. You can even provide a custom icon then and the app will run full screen. Although only in Safari. Besides that Benjamin is right. Don't underestimate your ...


6

I think you'd be surprised how smart users are, most of them are able to quickly distinguish native controls from web controls. That being said, as long as you don't deliberately try to make your controls look like part of the browser you should be ok (this is an anti-pattern that malware often uses to imitate system controls). In the Facebook and BBC ...


1

From my point of view, this is how i see it. It all depends upon the client, if they want the user to focus on one particular content even if it goes for duplication. For example, When I worked with one of my client, they want their news to be present on the right side area on 2 different pages. I suggested we show a gist of contents from News in the other ...


1

You need to define why this pattern is a "bad experience" for your app. Whether the pattern you are talking about is a good fit for your application depends on the information architecture you are creating. Understand the IA for your app and content then understand which patterns work well for your chosen organisational structure. Many content based apps ...


2

These controls are not part of Gmail but part of your OS, iOS in this case. They are always there whenever you access an input field. If there's only one on the page then both arrows are disabled. If there are two or more on the page then you can use the arrows to navigate between them.



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