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1

It seems as though you guys took personas a bit too literally with the concept of User-Centered Design and tried to implement personas into your web application. In short Personas seem to help designers and other stakeholders empathize with different types of users. A good place to start to learn about personas is this Smashing Magazine article. In short ...


1

Due to limited screen space, you should have it close after the user has made their selection. Because the user will have the ability to dig into the menu (and submenus), they will be able to see all their available options before selecting one. Once the user selects one, the odds of them wanting to immediately select another menu option are slim to none. ...


0

I would keep it closed due to limited space. If you want to go back to the page you can open it again. But users are not that likely to mess that up and being forwarded to a new page would be pretty annoying if the first thing you need to do is close the hamburger menu to get it out of your way to start browsing. Here are some popular examples that close ...


1

Personally I tend to favor sidebars at typical desktop widths in order to factor out navigation (and other things) to allow the "main" content more vertical space and decrease its width for more readable line length. To do this in a responsive framework you need to transform the sidebar into a top-bar for narrower viewports. For a news oriented site a ...


3

Sidebars can be often overlooked due to their history of being advertising heavy. If a lot of the following issues are present in your side bar then it is most likely being ignored (and unnecessary). Has your sidebar remained the exact same for the last 3 months? Does your sidebar exhibit signs of “sidebar creep” ? Was there a time when people ...


2

No one should not solely rely on the browsers back button. Why? Because Smart phones on average are growing at a faster rate than humans hand sizes. Look at where these back buttons typically are. Top right (general) Iphone standard view (bottom left) Iphone 6 horizontal view (top left) Now lets take a look at how users hold their devices ...


1

Theres a lot of stuff here about not removing or interfering with the browser back button but I don't think that's what the questioner is asking. The Browser's back button is there for the user and shouldn't therefore form a part of your projected user journeys. The user may have customised their browser so that the back button does not show - If you are ...


1

This is a tough question to answer without really getting deep into your app, but I'll take a crack. Be consistent with primary wayfinding I think Google has done a nice job with the hamburger-becomes-back approach. It still makes me nervous. The "menu" button on mobile (whatever form it takes) is about exposing a higher level of navigation. This is most ...


0

Why not both? onClick and onHover actions are not competing. If there will be no difference between the subcategories you are showing in both approaches why not showing the dropdown menu and also add the "onClick" action to the primary navs options to redirect to a second page showing the categories? I don't really see any drawbacks with this approach, ...


0

This is a great question, and it's very dependent on how complex the site is (categorically speaking) and your user-base and their needs. The real question that you'll want to be asking is not whether your colleagues feel one way or another is the correct path, but rather asking or looking at what your users are doing. Are they navigating to sub-categories ...


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I think the UX challenge here is readability. From the description of your 2nd colleague's idea, it sounds like your content is small enough to fit in the hover. Without knowing what that content is, I can't comment on the appropriateness of placing content in navigation. My concerns with the 2nd option are: 1) as amount of content (and size of each piece of ...


1

I'm currently in a similar situation. In my opinion it's actually not two alternative approaches, but more like adding an 'extra feature' to the main navigation – at least that's how the situation is in the project I'm currently involved in: main navigation + sub-categories on pages main navigation with sub-categories in hover + sub-categories on pages ...


2

As you mentioned, both ways are valid and could work as long as each one is user-friendly. So, there is no right or wrong, but you want to know what works best. I guess that the answer can't be 'the first' or 'the second' so you have to test it. I would do a usability test in both versions to see which of the two versions is more usable. However, I don't ...


0

I think the second one is better, because it only uses 2 pages, while the first one uses 3, so the second one is faster.


0

20 horizontal tabs is simply an overwhelming experience and being given 20 options side by side makes my brain hurt. My recommendation is to categorize your 20 selections into about 3 or 4 groups and create a pleasant vertical accordion menu. Below is an example of a vertical accordion menu. http://jsfiddle.net/8fhacfqa/


1

I would divide it in public and private. BTW I'm not aware of mobile conventions (maybe top buttons should be inside a hamburger menu to save space or to have 1 control with all the possible actions in that page). download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups An alternative would be to make the "Choose participants dialog" a ...


2

You could use chat bubbles in a horizontal list (which is technically a tab) like on the facebook messenger app, with a small number within a circle to indicate the amount of unread messages Here's a chat plugin i found quite user friendly. Even being quite feature heavy, it seems easy to use. might give you some ideas www.spot.im


0

Benefits of each option: Keeping the back button: Consistent with other pages in this app Consistent with a very familiar pattern on this platform Consistent behaviour with similar patterns on other interfaces (e.g. the ever-present back button on a browser). From any page, users can get back as far as they want using just one button Removing the back ...


2

Observations The existing approach is awkward because the add node buttons are placed in a toolbar away from the actual node being operated on. So the user needs to select a node, move the cursor to the toolbar, and then figure out what operation to select. The tree control is notoriously complex (multiple nodes, multiple levels of hierarchy). Therefore, ...


5

YES You're point out that there is a surplus of criticism and a scarcity of alternatives to the hamburger menu. Background Hamburger menus have been criticized because: They hide links and content from the user instead of presenting the user with direct options. The hamburger icon is placed at the top of the screen where users tend to ignore it. ...


4

Lose the breadcrumbs ... ... and you are fine : download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups As @DA01 said: Given the left menu is a tree menu, is there really a need for breadcrumbs? A tree menu is, essentially, vertical breadcrumbs


1

if they don't affect your design negatively, just leave both. Most users knows what a breadcrumb is since they use it in their computers and they know the breadcrumb is a path they can follow (hence the breadcrumb term). However, your left navigation is more of a question mark in terms of usability, because, by definition, you can take "jumps", thus you're ...


1

What makes you think bread crumbs are bad idea? The details on it is essential for the user to know target page. Especially when the navigation menu tab on the left is collapsed.


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I would prefer to have the Breadcrumbs. As a user for me the LHN is telling me the list of the available reports, whereas the breadcrumb is about the exact report i'm looking at. Breadcrumb helps to give a clear direction for the users, if there are any sub-reports available within REPORT 1 (as in your scrnshot)


0

When doing testing on such quasi multi lingual sites in the past I found there was nothing more annoying to users than when they were presented with a lovely traditional language selector only for the available pages in their language to be a mere fraction of that available in the major language. There are two solutions that stand out as a good idea to me- ...


2

As a user who quite often finds myself on Spanish language sites I think I'd find it frustrating to be provided a translated version only to have it removed on the next page. Often I will just let Google Translate change the page for me and just forgive the dodgy sentences that appear. I'd rather that than only be able to access a few properly translated ...


1

Based on the details you provided, i would suggest a tableview with a cell containing a switch that toggles the category or sub category. After a change in the category and sub category update to the main list of products. The concept is similar to the settings page -> cellular data


3

To give you some arguments: There is this thing that a users thumb is often only half the size of their phones screen. Depending on the way they hold it, it can be hard to reach the top navigation. For that reason your solution will be better. A popular way of hiding a lot of links to a lot of different pages is the drawer menu, hamburger menu or off ...


1

The correct Information Architecture term is a multi-dimensional hierarchy. Common websites that have that kind of structure are webshops (or Wikipedia). Search Webshops all rely heavily on the search functionality. I don't know if a search functionality is possible or useful within your web application, but it might provide the users with a fast way to ...


1

I would say definitely sacrifice the images on mobile. Don't think of it as a sacrifice though, just an efficiency :-) You'll never cater for the full breadth of mobile devices with a large menu and images - keep it simple and get the users where they want to go. By the looks of things the links have very concise titles so the images are just for aesthetic ...


0

I am missing which website we are talking about. Depending on that the process can be shorten or longer. I would suggest to first do an inventory list and have a full list of all the sitemap. Then in order to redesign the IA and if possible to also combine pages together this flow might be useful: create personas list the main use cases create the ...


2

I agree with others that it's a base design issue but if you can only change the top bar... Because of the colors used in the navigation of the "current product," you should use color to separate the product navigation from the current product. Use colors to disable buttons. You could left-justify the top navigation to separate it further. ...


2

None of the above? I mean this in a constructive way. Issues: You have 3 layers of navigation onscreen at the same time, which is pretty complicated for users. On top of that, the visual layout is confusing because you have a top navigation, and then a break for page title, then 2 more layers of navigation that are visually related by the tab idiom ...


0

I think split screen looks great as an idea, but is very difficult to implement in reality. So that's why you don't see them very often. For example, many sites are designed to be responsive nowadays, so while a split screen looks good on the web, it's very difficult to get it to work on mobile screens because the columns become too narrow to work with.


1

Additionally for clarity, one could also try altering the messaging of the "Home" button in the tabbed navigation, given that's the primary area a user will think to navigation. For example, you could try something like: Home - Accounting I also agree a combination of mockups A & C would work, with the underline being the most effective visual cue. A ...


0

First you need a communication strategy in phase with the strategic plan of the organization. The messy look of the IA is probably the consequence of no focus, no concrete objectives and too many people deciding what to put on the web site. The result is cacophony. Your first task is to get to know what this web site is supposed to do. Matt is right. Next, ...


2

Version C, with the underlines, is superior because it does not rely purely on colour but also has that additional visual clue. That makes it more accessible to people who have difficulty or simply cannot interpret differences in colour. I would however include colour as an additional clue in addition to the underline.


2

I think you're missing a key step which is audience personas. Who is the IA marketed at and what are their needs? When you have that, you can think from the users perspective. Then i would do card sorting from the audience point of view. You also need to have a concrete objective to make sure everything relates back to what you want to achieve.


0

Working on a project with a quite tight schedule and a complex IA structure we decided throw great chuncks of the previous structure over board –– to break with big/great ux strategies and boil things down to the following probably a bit unorthodox approach: First things first – and the rest will follow. We first identified the key functionalities / the ...



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