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It's mentioned clearly in the Google guidelines. You can use Home screen widgets or notifications to help your users navigate directly to screens deep within your app's hierarchy. For example, Gmail's Inbox widget and new message notification can both bypass the Inbox screen, taking the user directly to a conversation view. For both of these ...


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In the case of the Back button, you should make navigation more predictable by inserting into the task's back stack the complete upward navigation path to the app's topmost screen. This is just to make it more predictable. Apps like WhatsApp and Hangout do that. In fact those applications that minimize on back just because users arrived to that screen ...


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For a 2 page interaction you can use the tab approach, but make sure that selected tab is indicated better. Since the pages are not linked then the tabs should work.


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My opinion is to use the first pattern because it's clear and orderly. That way immediately stands out what folders and such elements. Folders then could be slightly differentiated by type, as per your design. I always prefer this choice in my porgettazione. Even from tests done in different situations, I noticed a greater speed by the user to achieve his ...


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The fact that some top level items are containers is already denoted by the collapse icon (and the plural verbal form). So having a folder icon serves as a third way of telling the same story. From a user perspective, you can argue that finding the requested item is more important than the knowledge of whether it is a container or not. What's more, with ...


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Don't waste space or create confusion When you duplicate information, you make the user look at it twice. This creates some disorientation. You can treat the top categories like tabs then expose their sub-categories at the top portion of your left nav. This has the benefit of encouraging subcategory discovery and providing a sense of place within the ...


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I would go for the first option. Showing blog posts on a "post-it" style seems to be a better option as you can show more information on a smaller screen and the user has the access to the full information at a distance of one click (or touch). I would suggest you to also put a thumbnail or a bit transparent version of the main image or video of the post in ...


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You could try using an accordion instead of tabs (here are some pros and cons), but it won't always work. Can't say that I see a good way of integrating tabs into the sidebar. As you mentioned,it doesn't look very good, and for a good reason - if all your objects have the exact same structure, it doesn't make a lot of sense to repeat it for each leaf in the ...


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So if I understand correctly, you have a website which lists places to be activities to do. Is it crowd-sourced? Is there any benefit of inviting users to contribute? Or your model considers users only as consumers? This is important because that is how you'd decide what elements should be on the front page. Let us have a look at two websites. 1. Zomato (A ...


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If your site is primarely about 'events' then you could help the user by 'clustering' your events and offer 'search entry points' depending on the two most relevant pieces of information probably all events have in common and the user is also aware of: time and space. This would enable users to search for events and activities in two ways, even if they had ...


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I think the Google design (homepage with just a searchfield) is bold, and maybe too bold for anything besides Google. So I'd put content on the front page. What comes to my mind? frequent searches (only successful ones: some hits, user selected at least one) (shows examples of what works, including search syntax) maybe some categories (shows what is ...


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The main reason of tab is to see all your option in one single sight, making a scrollable tab will lost the main feature of tabs. Every thing in the universe could be sectioned and classified based on a rule you put. Just discover a methodology and a unity doing that rule. if you couldn't sectioned it by function , it could be sectioned by alphabet, the ...


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Before you settle on a "Home" call to action review your task flows. If you are more than 2 levels deep and can't "cancel" or "back" out to the home screen you may have too deep a hierarchy. Try and do what you can to flatten so that you can utilize "back" or "cancel". "Home" is a non-standard action in mobile. This is a good opportunity for you to dig a ...


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I'm making an assumption that you are displaying sets of products with each set having 3 total products. If this is the case and you can display your products in squares, this layout may contribute to a solution.


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Consider the content to be displayed in the app; you're displaying lists. This means that when thinking about navigation, the most natural way to start is by 'listing' your list choices. Your heirarchy is fine, and the tabs are a good starting point in this case. A good convention when designing for tablets is a vertical bar design, like google uses for ...


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Start by questioning the design requirements, for example: - What is the intended purpose of the documentation page? - What is the desired outcome. I think having back to the top button only masks information architecture issues and lays the burden of dealing with complex content on the user. A more structural solution would be to focus on ...


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Both work, but it's more important to make sure that the top of the page is visually clear Let's look at what happens when the user hits the home or scroll to top button: The screen changes (either by scrolling or by jump). This is going to be cognitively disruptive for long documents, whether you scroll or jump: the user will still be confronted with a ...


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This is not about fancy "cinematic effects" or decoration. The animation actually serves the purpose of telling the user, that he or she is returning to a previous section of the document, thereby counteracting attention blindness and preventing confusion, especially in the case of the user accidentally clicking the back to top button. So yes, animate.


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It is a good question. If the size or length of the page is very long then don't use immediate transition from bottom to top. Instead provide page breakups like jump to title1, title2 etc. If the length of page is not really long then you can go with the transition but some subtle animation. It should be immediate change for a user.


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Never use an abrupt change on the layout. Instead, use a transition to avoid confusing the user in case of accidentally touching the "scroll to top" button. And same goes for any other action performed on your page/app: some mild transition helps the user understand there's a change in what he was seeing. Now, for long documentation pages, instead of a ...


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The Home key gets you to the top of the page. The only time I've found a "Go to top" button useful is on infinitely scrolling web pages where some cleanup is done when you click the button. If you do implement it, have it collect some stats, see how many people actually use it. I would be surprised if many do. Jump vs Scroll A smooth scroll can provide a ...


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A precedent that comes to mind is the interface for editing track metadata in iTunes. If you select an individual track you get a dialog with the various fields, and if you select multiple tracks you get a very similar dialog, but the individual fields now apply to multiple tracks instead of just one. If you are only viewing information, and don't need to ...


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Refere My Image, i am not getting clearly that what you want to say but as far as I understand. I create this mockup. You can use Expander in for detail page. In that expander display overview of detail page. i.e. Name, Number, Qty. etc. and put there "View Detail" or "Read More" Option. Also you can add that function on title click too. If user want to ...


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Let's start with your options... You have heterogenous options. That means, your options are all pretty different. Because maps are very different from ratings, which are very different from search, it's not easy for users to process a lot of heterogenous options. Compare that to homogenous options where the items are of the same kind. For 8-10 ...


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I'd got with Horizontal scrolling as its not uncommon in mobile apps these days. you could add a "+" or a 'more' and anchor that so the user is scrolled a bit horizontally so they know the screen in horizontally scrollable


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Try Recommending instead of showing equal choices. The paradox of choice is a funny thing. You can give someone so many options that they no longer have any options at all. There are plenty of psychological studies that show how paralyzing too many choices can be. Presenting tons of options can be a barrier to entry. In order to combat such analysis ...


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I agree with your opinion that the current design is clunky. Unless you're trying to be really innovative, and your users are open to the discovery process, it's generally not good practice to design an interface that people have to learn how to use. There are some really common design patterns that accomplish exactly what you're trying to do, minus the ...


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Another pattern to consider is a multi-step toggle, as illustrated here: http://codepen.io/bradfrost/full/qwJvF from the excellent This is Responsive resource. Another interesting idea is to skip the subnav entirely. I've been trying to keep tabs on this problem too, so perhaps these will be relevant to you: UX Designers Side Drawer Navigation Costing ...


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Split layouts are great visually, however, when it comes to content, split layout are tough. The one you posted doesn't allow for scrolling the page = you have to place all content within that split layout. If will of course work better when there is not much content to start with. However, keep in mind that websites usually grow in size and content. Hence, ...



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