New answers tagged

1

Switching between all circles and your circles is actually filtering results, so display the filters:


0

I would expand on your side bar idea but keep it hidden instead of fixed. This would save that valuable horizontal screen space. Maybe have a tab like so: The tab could be moving subtly or have a subtle color change to indicate its importance. When a user wants to make a selection/navigate to a different section, they would click on the hamburger menu ...


3

The notion that you have "2 home pages" is your problem. Your website has one homepage. It can have 2 major sub-sections (or 3, or 4, ...) under that homepage. Your logo should take the user to the homepage, from which the user can navigate to the sub-section they need. Proper page design should allow you to have a very clear navigational structure that ...


0

I think everything is okay, in terms of how you did the navigation. It's good that the layout is dynamic. But, I think you should change up the photograph with the scrolling, in order to denote different sections and to make the experience a little more interesting. Now, the photograph is the same for every screen shot you provided. Also, when you speak ...


0

There is research out there showing that people are more likely to click a button labeled "Menu" rather than a hamburger icon, but that says little about their motivation. ("Menu" is a relatively vague term, whereas a hamburger is slowly becoming a standard symbol for a specific kind of menu: a top-level navigation menu.) Norman and Nielsen advocate labeling ...


0

A (top/bottom) bar navigation is a pattern that can be very effective, but isn't widely popular on Android. This is exactly the reason why you were able to find multiple iOS apps who use it, while Android seems to be "lagging behind". There are multiple articles talking about this in general, mostly how this tabbed navigation should display core features ...


6

1. Use an existing convention Typically, the 'more' is represented by 3 stacked lines or 'hamburger' as designers call it... Sometimes, a set of 3 dots, horizontally- or vertically- aligned represents this, 2. Create a hybrid You can create some unique variation of this icon by combining your business brand with this universal web design symbol! 3. Do ...


2

The more menu on a bottom navigation menu is actually a rather common navigation pattern. Yelp, Yahoo fantasy football, Band are a few apps just on my phone that use this navigation paradigm. There are pros and cons to any navigation approach, the main con of a bottom navigation bar being that it uses more screen real estate than say your typical off ...


0

Nick Butcher, a Google Design/Developer advocate, advises to clear the back stack on switching categories using the navigation drawer.


1

Nick Butcher, a Google Design/Development Advocate, has addressed this in this presentation: https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos/+NickButcher/albums/5981768132040708401/5981768199164803938?pid=5981768199164803938&oid=118292708268361843293 : "Selecting a section in the drawer should reset your task back stack". Also, the reason why the back button does ...


1

It all depends If this is for a main page, then you can (and probably should) have this redundancy. Not because of discovery or hidden links issues or whatever, but because this is a homepage where some specific links (specially something like "Services") are the reason of the whole site/app to exist, so you give them more visibility. Now, if your link ...


0

There isn't a yes or a no answer i think it depends on the content you intent it hold and the context of it within your use case. I personally like sticky headers and footers for keeping say favorites at the top of a list or something like that. There are a few articles about the pro's and cons's but the are focused on websites and most on simple nav. i ...


0

I remember seeing a dribbble where someone had redesigned a medium.com page. One of the things they had done was a small TOC anchored to the left, I really liked the idea. But the only way you will ever know is to try it, put a quick wireframe together and if it still makes sense then go from there. I actually love the idea of a TOC on smaller screens that ...


3

This is very much an "it depends" kind of question; as posed there's no single "correct" answer. Is the lengthy article something that users are likely to read continuously, from beginning to end? If so, intra-article navigation may not be necessary at all, and if included should be backgrounded rather than made persistently available so it doesn't ...


0

Your question highlights the problem of the long scroll. First of all, it's a myth that people don't scroll. Everybody Scrolls. There are so many articles present supporting this fact like this one and this one. But the real problem is with the text-based articles where you are least communicating with the user or the user is looking for a particular ...


0

Exis ran an A/B test on this topic. In his case the result was that the text menu with a border (making it very obvious that it's a button which you press to view the menu) worked best. Who would've figured ;) Full article: http://exisweb.net/mobile-menu-abtest


0

I suggest the alternate way of providing the hamburger menu is the usage of floating menu button or tabs which will help the user to see the options upfront and not using the whole real estate.This will increase the efficiency as well.


0

One item can be added into multiple folders If the item is not duplicated when added to multiple folders, then it sounds like you're talking about tags, not folders. I think this might be easier if you think about it as tags, and filtering the listings (similar to faceted navigation / etc).


2

Everything depends on purpose of Website. What all information or content present on website decides footer Links/Content. But am not here to just say "depends!" So presuming your friends' startup would need the website more importantly for media-marketing and is not website based startup(guessed from number of pages). Rule of thumb for UX: More ...


0

Nice. Looks real clean. You have probably thought about this - I would also suggest being able to see where the user is arriving from. If I am arriving from the parent layer, and arrive to the child layer, I would perhaps add a hint at the top, of the parent layer that has been selected to orientate the user.


2

If the information is duplicated in the footer, it becomes redundant. So, scrap it. You're right. There's no point in showing everything twice.


0

Toggles will always be confusing, as explained by others: http://ux.stackexchange.com/a/1321/84675 http://stackoverflow.com/a/2721066 As the learning curve is small, the best thing to do is make a consistent choice that works for the visual hierachy of your UI: All icons represent the current state All icons represent the action on click


2

Question and answers here are old, but the challenges when it comes to some kind of multi level mobile navigation are timeless. The most obvious choice is the NavigationDrawer (left sliding menu). It’s the prefered pattern if you have really complex and feature rich structure from the beginning. Another scenario is when you are just starting and need the ...


1

Generally speaking Apple is the opposite of Windows. The reasons for this go back a long way, and it's Windows that didn't think about it, they simply wanted to do it the opposite to the Mac. I say this because it's useful to understand that some initial thought went into the order of affirming an action, or escaping from it. Apple's designers decided we ...


0

If I have to look up at the shopping cart icon to know that I'm in the shopping cart, that's the design problem. A user's attention is on the contents of the page. The contents of that page should make it clear where the user is and, in the case of a shopping cart, where the user goes next. It is of absolutely no cognitive benefit to the user to highlight a ...


2

This is a fantastic candidate for a highly interactive data visualization. Once I got to the map, I thought, YES, this is what tells the story. My criticism of the current setup is that it is a pogo-sticking workflow that forces you down a path then up and out again if you want to either get an overview or learn more about a specific thing. That's not ...


1

Tabs have their pros and cons. The user flows for creating reports do not have to be the same as the user flows for editing an existing report. For example, when you create a new report, maybe consider using a multi-step wizard (no tabs) to guide the user though the task, but when you edit an existing report you can now use a tab view. Are you able to do ...


0

I think it would not hurt to add some sort of a search box - experienced users could just type what they need and only matching nav items would pop up.


0

I would investigate a combination of a "mega menu" and in each section have the navigation listed in the footer. This way, as the user navigates the various pages in a given section, having read top to bottom, they can navigate to the next page using the bottom footer. Footer would have each of the sections listed horizontally and level 2 subpages listed ...


0

@Crossfire, correct me if i'm wrong please, have a look at the mobile coin screen https://au.pinterest.com/pin/180284791312295679/ in addition, from the last screen (coin details), user also can drag back and forth to check 'previous' / 'next' coin screen. forgive me for not adding that screen. let me know if it works, thank you.


0

I would approach this using a "Search and Filter" methodology. Your information architecture has multiple levels, but users don't think about content that way. They think more abstractly - as in, "What is the first thing I think about when searching for a specific coin". It could be a date, country, color, detail, text or inscription - or something even more ...


0

I would say your option 3 is better. In option 2 you are again pushing user to edit same record which is frustrating and bad UX for user.


1

If you want to know the best solution from a user experience perspective, create mock-ups of a couple of those options and test them with a few people (you can use simple mock-ups to test design ideas) - you don't need to test with many people, and you will soon see which option one works best. I only say this because I work with Enterprise software and it ...


2

As far as making the buttons stand out and look clickable compared to their surroundings, I think you've succeeded pretty well :-) I would personally choose your side-by-side setup, especially if you're already dealing with the subject of categories and sub-categories. Your second setup risks implying the hierarchy between both. Having both options next to ...


1

Lea, instead of low contrast for the first and last tab, you can hide arrows. just my 2 cent, https://au.pinterest.com/pin/180284791312274083/ instead of showing complete tab, I hide half the first and last 'navigation tab' so that user can understand/curious there are more links. It is not a big issue, but just sharing an option. (*sorry for the link, i've ...


0

Something that is commonly done is that if you want to use tabs, have it scale responsively down to a certain break point and then make the tabs become an accordion menu. For example for mobile and tablet it would be an accordion menu and then above 768px it would break out and become an enlarged tab menu.


1

Thanks to a colleague at work I've finally found a solution : The source link : https://material.angularjs.org/latest/demo/tabs


1

Congratulations - you have discovered one of the major challenges with Tabs :-) One part of the challenge is based on how you construct the Tab (I am assuming this is HTML), e.g. if you use CSS to set the width of the tab you will have problems (it is better not to set a width and let the container adopt its width based on its text content). If you are ...


2

Yea! This approach will work because its obvious what you are trying to do :) You are even using the particular color of the navigation as the background color. Nice move. Maybe consider dimming or decreasing the saturation of the other menu options when the user is navigating through a particular parent/menu option? If you want to read about mobile ...


0

The title states you are looking for a Modern solution but the solution has nothing to do with being modern or not. A better question is whether the instructions are usable or not. The bottom line is you need to ensure the user receives accurate but succinct instructions that help them get to where they need to be without distracting them from the act of ...


0

Your tabs have names which are sign posts and navigation triggers to specific pages/features which contain functionality, e.g. Subscriptions Option A is much simpler: Choose Subscriptions by clicking the tab Choose what you want to do about Subscriptions on the Subscription page by interacting with subscription features on the subscription page This ...


0

In my perspective, navigation is main controller of the website. it has to carry any information not a question. Why don't you go for creating a signup and subscription on top of your page or in the footer. any how that depends on the requirement. in your view option B is suitable for your requirement where user can see sign in and subscription as an ...


0

Most of the websites probably choose a horizontal header because it is commonly considered that this visual organization of website elements is more consistent with human perception. However, an outside the norm approach, when used correctly, can become a memorable experience, thanks to its rare occurence. It is not important if the navigation menu is a ...


0

Consider these 2 thoughts: A) Many users will have a wide screen monitor. So for them the horizontal space is not really an issue. Instead the vertical space is where the premium is at. B) Secondly, your side menu can easily collapse or slide in/out, thus effectively saving you the horizontal space you are concerned about.


0

There are regions where you read right-to-left (Kurdistan is a region that comes to mind). In such a culture, putting the navigation elements on the right-hand-side may make more sense, since that is where a reader's eye may start browsing the page.



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