New answers tagged

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According to interaction-design.org: Content in any digital page layout will follow a specific hierarchy. Headers appear above body text. Menus go at the top, bottom, left, or right of the screen (or any combination of these). Designers try to organize content so that they present the highest priority content on any given page first. Then, they ...


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Consider these 2 thoughts: A) Many users will have a wide screen monitor. So for them the horizontal space is not really an issue. Instead the vertical space is where the premium is at. B) Secondly, your side menu can easily collapse or slide in/out, thus effectively saving you the horizontal space you are concerned about.


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There are regions where you read right-to-left (Kurdistan is a region that comes to mind). In such a culture, putting the navigation elements on the right-hand-side may make more sense, since that is where a reader's eye may start browsing the page.


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I would suggest: Separating each list item in the nav visually in order to create a better on-page information architecture Organizing the information into a hierarchy. For example, all response time items could come under one heading and all volume types could come under another heading. This would allow you to have shorter list items and reduce ...


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From a design standpoint, however, drop-down menus are an excellent feature because they help clean up a busy layout. If structured correctly, drop-down menus can be a great navigation tool, while still being a usable and attractive design feature. drop-down navigation menus can be user-friendly. Recently Jacob Nielsen the results of his recent drop-down ...


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In 99% of the cases you don't need to keep multiple parent items expanded at once. Moreover, it is advisable not to do so, as you don't want the user to get confused about her current location on your website and eventually get lost. And yes, there are scenarios in which you would want to have all the items expanding without collapsing their siblings. Such ...


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"It doesn’t matter how good your website is if users can’t find their way around it." - By jerrycao Continuing with my answer posted just a day before. I stated that collapse menu's are better, and also gave some valid reasons. Note: Please read my previous answer(linked above), come back and continue here. Now talking about your case, I would ...


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Provide them shortcuts for expand/collapse all, then let them organize it from there (unless there's some explicit reason for them not to be able to expand multiple siblings concurrently).


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I've found that letting users choose when tabs open and closed is best, so I would leave it up to the user to collapse one menu, even when following a link in another menu. A scenario describing why would include users who might be navigating through different parts of the site multiple times. If I want to go to the pratius page, then artius, them to ...


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The word Menu which looks like a button (i.e. with an outline) seems to be the most user friendly. Articles: http://deep.design/the-hamburger-menu/ http://exisweb.net/mobile-menu-icons


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In my experience, there are often established naming conventions within a company that may not necessarily align to Nielsen's definition or other "standards" - so unless you are in a position to redefine how people talk about the various navigation structures, it's good to be flexible. Both "secondary" and "utility" are open to interpretation (does ...


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Though it depends on what type of users you are dealing with, but in most of the cases yes it's required. For example if there is a page of "terms and conditions" , or say "our team". Because of mental model of the user(most of the websites place it on the bottom) normal user tendency will be, to look at the bottom of the page (Footer). But, if you are ...


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There are probably two main schools of thought behind this, but again it depends on how applicable it is to your website or service. One school of thought is about consistency when providing navigation for users. You may find that some top and side navigation are duplicated exactly, some have more or less content, but they maintain the same structure/...


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Are you really getting any benefit on removing the app bar? Remember that by removing it, the user is losing consistency on the navigation which may lead to some confusion. Even though on Android devices we have the back button, the programmer will still need to take that in consideration so the device's back button takes the user to the previous view ...


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I like the style you have going on. Try breaking up the two links into buttons like this? You don't have to underline text in a button on hover. Underlining is meant more for in-text links. Perhaps add a subtle drop shadow on hover for each button.


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Taking your options: "Move to root" If this is the only place where the file can be moved, then this would be correct, specially on a tree representation "Move to top" This is really unclear and has a lot of friction. Top of what? A positional attribute might be very confusing for something that can be represented in different views "Remove from folder" ...


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Out of your options: 1st and 2nd option qualify to be an action. The third one suggests a destructive action which doesn't really suggest "moving". Now, depending on your users, if they know technical terms such as Root, you could go with Option 1: Move to Root. Another option can be: Move to Main Directory. This can be customizable according to the ...


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simply style them as buttons, this way there won't be any doubt at all and you'll eliminate any friction on the perceived affordance of these elements. It's as simple as that. Otherwise, underline them, just as you mention. But more important: use one color for links and a different one for text. Your perception probably comes from the fact nothing (...


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The most obvious way to make something look like a link is to underline it. So underline. I think, from your example, that these are clearly links. The position, the container, and the words themselves, even when the hover state is not activated, say 'link'. Why are you unsure about the obviousness of these links? How do you know? If you test with users (...


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This relates as much to UX patterns as it does to operating system patterns. When you learn a bit of Swift, you realize it's not about "hiding the bottom navigation", but actually about using a different form of presentation for the content you're about to show. If you're designing for iOS, Apple describes it best in the iOS Human Interface Guidelines: ...


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Utility Navigation definition from Nielsen: Summary: Utility navigation consists of secondary actions and tools, such as contact, subscribe, save, sign in, share, change view, print. These activities strongly affect website visitor satisfaction, user experience, and engagement. Put utilities where people expect and need them. Primary vs ...


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You could split them into Categories with the use of Chips just like Google Play Store does. Take a look at the screenshot below. How this helps is, that it removes any element of horizontal swiping. Since your question consists of Tabs, it is possible the user is confused to swipe between tabs which are swipe-able and bottom navigation which is not. ...


1

Both options seem valid for me, it all depends on the business rules behind it. You cannot compare a content website like youtube to a brand website like wacom of pg. A brand website usually create this kind of pages because they have different localised website across the regions. The websites might look really different in terms of look and feel and ...


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Both are traditionally known for displaying More Options You can think of them as Ellipsis that refer to un-finished menu and hence clicking on it shows you the entire menu, finishing it. On Android, it is referred to as Overflow Menu On Apple and iOS devices it is referred to as More Options Menu Technically these are used to display Secondary options ...


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The implementation of trees in either navigation or organisation purposes (or both) only works if there is some order (and hierarchy) through which the user can traverse to find what they are looking for. So there has to be some sort order by default anyway. If you are asking whether it should always be sorted in a particular way by default (e.g. ...


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It might also be interesting to try to access these sites with restricted browsers (say lynx or with JavaScript disabled) or from a machine equipped for blind users. Having a dedicated, static HTML page might be part of the strategy for dealing with these situations.


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I don't think you are missing anything, the above site 'http://us.pg.com/ or http://www.wacom.com/' options are handled very well. My analysis on apple.com, country selection must be in new page because the country list is more than 140+. Its hard to handle such a big number selection on same page. My suggestion on providing the Country selection option ...


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If the sub-categories are not more than 2 in each category then show it upfront, by placing category as title. This way you will not confuse the user and also you are not hiding the information. But if you have more category with sub-categories then you have to find a work around on IA.


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If there's no way to get around submenus, the key is to provide a clear visual difference between levels and making it clear which main menu the submenu corresponds to. There's probably a million different ways you could do that, but the most common tend to involve changes in: Indentation Color Font size, weight, or family Spacing/delimiters Casing In ...


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This article outlines the most common mobile navigation patterns and should help you choose the right navigation approach for your scenario: https://www.nngroup.com/articles/mobile-navigation-patterns/


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You might need ARIA attributes to make your panel behave like a drop-down field (which is essentially what you are simulating with your filter panel). Alternatively just use a standard html drop-down field instead of a panel (i.e. select & option elements). Why make this more complicated for you or your user? Using a drop-down would mean you get all the ...


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This doesn't look right. Intuitively, I'd think I'm oin some page listed on the top bar, but.... Which one? Thus, the sidebar that (as you mention) should assist the flow has more questions marks than real solutions, because it has no context or parent. And then, to make it even more confuse, you have tabs, and dropdown selections inside the tab panel. In ...


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Making the top-level navigation bar more intuitive would be helpful. Increasing the font-size, change of color when an item is selected, drop-down menu's to minimize more horizontal menus etc. The vertical menu(on the right) could be made collapsible depending on usage frequency for the task in hand. Describing the use case for this layout will ...


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Because it's easier and because it looks better. Making a button costs effort. making two buttons costs more effort. Effort costs money and you want to spend as little as possible. So if you interface works 'acceptably' why spend more money and effort? Sure some big companies or some that care about usability will spend the effort, it might even be ...


1

IMHO, your approach is way too convoluted and has a lot of friction. Having a modal with inner navigation (or a stepper) and then a submit button only after all steps were completed is asking for trouble. First of all, when you use a modal, you use to interrupt a flow and require an action based on the context. If you have multiple actions, you're losing ...


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For the how, it is certainly possible and there are a number of templates and patterns for doing so available, such as this one. In that example you could use "Bug X" instead of "Step X" in your headers and you'd have a nice step-by step modal with a progress bar to show the SCRUM master his progress. As for the question of should you the primary ...


4

Tab is for switching between elements, not selecting different items within the same element. I think this is why the problem arises. Your element is similar to a drop-down list. Typically tab would allow you to select that list, but not iterate through the items in the list. Using the same key for both selecting and iterating through a control results ...


1

According to your comment, you have basically two different areas: the neutral lobby and all the process rooms. Well, that hotel/office metaphor came naturally. So you could make a "shiny" lobby looking very different from the office rooms where the work happens. Since it sounds like one person could have to work in more than one office, the differences ...


0

It mostly depends on how many secondary screens the user can access from your main menu. If the user can access to 4 or more screens from it (and take into account that the access to the settings screen should be into the overflow menu in the action bar OR in the navigation drawer, so don't count it by now) go with the navigation drawer. If the accesses to ...


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Great question, Adam! No, it is not necessary to have a Back button in the Toolbar if you have a Navigation bar in the Activity. A rule of thumb to follow is that you can substitute Tabs instead of Navigation Drawer if the tabs are limited i.e. 3-4 or else have scrollable tabs. Considering the fact that you are in the Secondary Activity of an App, it need ...


0

Without knowing much about the app and desired user tasks, I would leverage the multi-step process and bake it into the ui. Let it be the personality and character of the UX. I agree that hiding the affordance is not a good approach. Make it as enjoyable and fun as you can!


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No. This is because typically a customer does not continue shopping on the website after they place an order; they instead leave the website as there is nothing more to do (i.e, a 'continue shopping' button is not the expected workflow). If appropiate, a link to view/edit the order can be used instead.


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Based on my understanding of how your sticky nav works, the amount of elements you have is fine for several reasons. It already meets the speedy needs of most of your visitors. After looking at Nielsen Norman Group's 5 Types of E-Commerce Shoppers, your site visitors are likely: Product Focused (going in already knowing what they want to purchase) ...


0

Here are three examples based on what you want. I believe these are more user-friendly. However, whenever you are developing new ways, test it and if your target users like it. Then you have solved the problem. I have read that Hamburger menu increases conversion rate as for secondary menu, you can either combine them into the hamburger menu as below : ...


0

You could try something like this. in terms of selection it's similar to mac osx navigation style. in the 1st column is the actual form and in the 2nd column is the option or input for the form selected. this means your input area are all shared by the 2nd column space. and selecting each field you want to enter changes the 2nd column


3

Perhaps a searchable dropdown could fit your needs: On opening, the dropdown will show you all possible choices, which you can filter by typing in the desired term.


4

The common (almost too common) way to provide choices of many options is often via the dropdown, but a flat list of options can be made easier to digest by grouping the items and, at the very least, ordering the items alphabetically. Say 10 ordered groups each with 10 ordered items in might be manageable. A further refinement is to make the dropdown ...



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