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From your description, you are trying to distinguish between two levels: global and personal. Let's first weigh options: Show both: I've seen apps that use the left/right bar to distinguish between two levels.\ Show one: Create iconography. This is difficult because the ability for the user to understand where they are is function of how familiar they are ...


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More content: pages, less content: stack. Items in category: pages, sequence or story: stack. Each section needs call to action: pages, just one call to action per page: stack. I would use tabs here, because products assortment in shops tends to grow typically, because this is a horizontal categorisation and because each section here would benefit from ...


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There are many great arguments FOR breadcrumbs, and for the most part, the ones against it hinge on its age as a design pattern or the real estate they occupy. My guess is that one guy wrote a post somewhere about ditching breadcrumbs or questioning their relevance, pointing them downhill into the ethos of post-modern design: where everything has been done ...


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I've never come across something that can't be sectioned. But if it really is something that can't be sectioned, then my advice is go vertical, not horizontal. Tabs are normally horizontal. But since you can't scroll horizontal, go vertical. A navigation list. If you would like a more extensive answer, I would suggest you post some more information.


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You have three options here (listed in order of growing complexity & amount of functionality): Top navigation in the header/breadcrumbs works fine for monofunctional app with two-level navigation. Bottom menu for cases with 3-5 main functions or pages Sidebar that slides from the left on tap by the hamburger icon. For complex apps with many ...


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This article answers this very well - [WEB AIM - Skip Navigation] Some key points: Providing visible links at the top of the page The key is to make sure the link is one of the first items that screen readers hear and that keyboard users tab to. Otherwise, users may not realize there is a "skip navigation" link there at all, and may waste time trying ...


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if google uses about instead of about us, you should probablly be save with contact over contact us :) I haven't heard or seen any problems with the use of contact yet.


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I recently conducted a few usability studies and 2 of 4 people clicked the logo in the upper left corner to reset everything they were doing and get back to the "Home Page" one of them didn't even realized he had done it when I asked him why he clicked the upper left corner of the page. I don't think it is necessary to call it "Home" but I do think that ...


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There are generally two ways of looking at responsive we design. make a simple one level navigation, which is easy to scale down. Make a separate set of pages for phone sizes. With the simple set-up there is not much glitz or excitement so the entire site will be somewhat bland as compared to a multi use site where you are free to do some really cool ...


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It is a long standard that every top level link should present a page with the name of the link and that page should present the next level of sub links. This continues for each level. The content on those pages should contain and overview of of the pages each link will present A bread crumb trail below the nav bar is also very good for people who prefer ...


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Here are some options. a horizontal top nav bar can be almost any size so if you were to size the tags even twice the size of say a 12px font you will have a very small nav bar. Since most people currently use at least 768px high screens that isn't much. Placing it at the top and giving it a fixed position means it is always available no matter how long ...


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I love your idea, and it is used in other examples as well. (The LDS has a Gospel Library app, with a digital hymn book, that functions in a similar fashion.) But I have a few ideas to add, if they sound decent. This first idea is related to Google's Instant Results. Pretend I'm looking for hymn... #314, let's go with that. What if you made it so when I ...


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That pattern is a good start, both accessing a hymn by number or via a few words from its title or any of its verses. I would also suggest that include a "favorites list" and maybe something to facilitate pre-service preparation. By that, I mean that prior to a service beginning, a user could enter all of the hymns for the up coming service, then operate ...


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The concepts You are here ( 'this is selected' ) This has deeper navigation ( 'this will take you somewhere else' ) Are quite closely associated concepts in the users "website navigation domain". So having 'arrow based' symbols for both is not conflicting, and may even be beneficial (lower the cognitive load) - providing the styling and contextual ...


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An ellipsis gives me the idea that the label text didn't fit the space. If I saw it I would hover it to see a tooltip for the complete text. How about using a down arrow: After your comment it's clear that it isn't about a dropdown menu. But I still think the ellipsis isn't the best indicator for an item with it's own menu. Desktop conventions don't ...


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You could remove the link from the site name and leave the dashboard link. Linking the site name / logo is a common way for users to get back to the homepage, but you don't have to do it — especially if it's an internal website. Or you could keep it as is.


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The wireframe you have provided (with an arrow on the right of the text) to show that that particular level has sub sections in the same level could be changed. Move the arrow on the right to the left of the button before the text with a few pixels of padding. This is a very standard tree organization approach.


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If the logo is inline with the other navigation (and is on the left), I think an additional 'Home' button is not required. (Example: http://stackexchange.com) [Logo][About Us][General Information] If the logo is not inline with the other navigation (e.g. above the navigation bar), I think a home button is useful. (Example: http://www.copyright.gov/) ...



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