Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

About, About US, even About the Bakery at least all contain the word about and as others have said it is what users expect to see. When doing a commercial website it is important to keep focused on standards otherwise you may as well throw up a picture of a Roll and see what happens.


0

"About" or "About Us" seems to be standard for most websites. Some companies try to be creative and use other words as you have suggested. I don't see an issue with that. If you're using your SEO description, title, and keyword tags for each page then google will find them anyway. I think the navigation should be clear and concise. So keep the navigation ...


0

The argument of long pages and 'people don't scroll' has been heard many times and is debunked many times*. However, I think there can be more reasons to spread content over different pages and maybe relevant in this case. Looking at your examples, I see different types of content like software (drivers), documents (manuals), videos, etc. In your example you ...


2

Only since the larger iPhone was introduced does this seem to now cause an issue. I think they were originally aiming for a consistent approach with desktop Safari, i.e. top left. All that being said, I think the advent of larger screens means these controls have to shift and change. I use the 'swipe back' gesture almost exclusively now. It's simple, fast, ...


1

I'm not sure if you can control that the site is opened in a webview under other apps (I don't think so). There is no way to deal with it, some apps open the sites in-app, some others do it in the browser (safari). You can't do anything about it. Maybe the best way to deal with it is basically avoid fixed headers in mobile webs, so you will have only one ...


0

The iOS navigation controller is intended for content that is hierarchical by nature, not for free browsing with a back button. In the example below, I marked all non-hierarchic jumps with a # List of all movies > movie details > list of actors in that movie # actor details > list of movies he played in # movie details > list of actors ... Doing such an ...


0

There seems to be three types of pages in your navigation: Newsfeed, Messages: these seem to contain live content that frequently gets updated and it would make sense that the user will want to visit these pages frequently. Contacts, Shifts, Tasks: These contain useful information that the user may want to access frequently but doesn't get updated on a ...


0

Definitely use a burger. You could put the settings in the burger menu too. Fix the settings to the bottom of the burger menu and use a vertically scrolling contact list that scrolls behind the settings button.


0

There might be a case when the number of links in one of the panels of the accordion is so large that the user ought to scroll to see all them. In which case, using an accordion instead of a long list seems futile. But, at the same time, when using a long list the user may not be able to view all the sections and links in one go. Accordion, at least ...


1

It's seems as though a conventional method is through tabs that you can "break out". It's the same behavior that occurs when you drag a Google Chrome tab out of the window - a new window appears that you can position wherever. I've seen the same behavior in enterprise software. The viewing pane has detachable tabs allowing you to create/modify views on ...


1

Let me see if I understand You have two tabs where users do their work. +-------+ +-------+ | TAB 1 | | TAB 2 | +-------+ +-------+ And now you need users to navigate between the pages? How about a main nav section? It's done all the time. :-) +----------------------------------+ | Main Nav | ...


0

What is the intended task for this workflow? What would be the task for the last page? For example: if the last page is a utility for e.g. configuring, you can provide a button/banner in the content which says "Gets started", "Continue" whatever,... which brings the user back to the entry point of the standard workflow. For example look at the adress book ...


1

I'd agree with the answer in the other thread you linked; two would be confusing so the "best practice" is probably "don't do it". Users who are less accustomed to the hamburger menu might not know what it is even if there's only one, and having multiple of the same icons would be even more confusing since it'd be the same icon that does different things. ...


0

For our product, which is case management (not a retail or commercial product) I started implementing new pagination. It is compact and has a field for user entry and there is a dropdown.


3

Interesting question. I think you can have a look at the paper "Letter case and text legibility in normal and low vision". In the abstract you can read: Using a single unaltered font and all upper-, all lower-, and mixed-case text, we assessed size thresholds for words and random strings, and reading speeds for text with normal and visually impaired ...


2

I recommend that you reserve the hamburger icon only for the main navigation menu. Whether you agree on its viability or not, it's been adopted in many designs (and propagated by the likes of Bootstrap) that a common pattern can be derived that (1) it is used primarily for the main menu and (2) it is used once.


0

The answer to this question really depends on your website architecture, your users search habits and many more factors (including: SEO, SEM campaigns, user journeys, etc). Having said that, I suggest you read this article: "Myth #17: The homepage is your most important page". Even though you "completely disagree as I think an home page is a very ...


3

Ask yourself the following: Is the content on the web page supposed to be disclosed and hidden from unauthorized users? Do you want to restrict social sharing from those users you’re e-mailing? Is it a bad thing that users you haven’t e-mailed also get hold of the information through trusted friends? Do users in general trust an obviously unsafe password ...


0

This question made me think and revisit some of the apps using this pattern to look specifically for any Usability issues. Some more include - Facebook Messenger, Tumblr, Swarm by Foursquare. When I had first seen these apps they seemed odd to me as an Android UX designer who is aware of Android guidelines. But I don't think they pose any major usability ...


1

It's platform dependent according to Nielsen Norman Group. Summary: Should the OK button come before or after the Cancel button? Following platform conventions is more important than suboptimizing an individual dialog box. That said, It's correct on Apple devices, but not OK on Android/Windows Phone devices.


1

I recommend that 'Cancel' should be removed and retain the "Back to..." link. Currently, initiating either the "Cancel" and "Back To..." actions invoke the same abandonment of the use case of making updates to this user profile. The only difference is that the "Back To.." link is more explicit in where the user will be taken compared to the "Cancel" button. ...


0

Great question. This won't be a definitive answer by any means, but here are a few key things I would keep in mind. Note that some of what I'm about to say has already been covered very well in the following two articles: How Should Your Mobile and Desktop Sites Differ? Your Content, Now Mobile Which information should be left on the map? Short answer: ...


0

Have you done any user interviews? I would try some variations on your design and get some feedback from people in a cafe or someplace. After reading your description, my suggestion would be to make "venues" it's own menu item that takes users straight to the venue management interface (only one click required) then put the cities, countries and timezones ...


1

The answer to this is going to heavily depend on the transition between the list and the details view. For example, if the details view slides in (not a hard refresh), then it makes more sense for the buttons to be "Save" and "<- Back", indicating that it moves you back to the list view. If the details view appears above the list view, then "Save" and ...


1

I don't have the research but in my own experience (also opinion) it gives the user a reference and easier recognition of the nav or tertiary content to main content. Even more important I believe on the side of UX; a visual hierarchy and focus to the main by giving a darker, to less dark nav and tertiary controls, to light main areas gives the user a ...


0

As a phone is an "smart" device I would expect that there would be a better UX than mapping a static paper/digital map into phone format. I would approach design from a goal driven point of view e.g. A fire escape plan has key information if there is fire, but this information is just ancillary. The goal is to get out of building safely and as quickly as ...


3

General answer is Back button shouldn't discard previously entered data. Holding the data avoids data entry duplication, if they returns back to this step. Data entry is quite painful activity for users. Invalid data should be holded too (it provides recognition), still the system should verify critical data before switching to the next step.



Top 50 recent answers are included