New answers tagged

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As a general design principle for the web, you should provide a way for the user to navigate your system, which includes always providing a way out as a must. Ok, users could use the native button, but it's always better to be explicit since you should design for everyone and not expect users to resolve a simple situation as going back or navigate to other ...


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I'm going to attempt to solve this. Here is what I proposed: Proposed Sub Navigations download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups You could use a combination of direct links and a drop down menu to maintain consistency. Ideally drop down menu should be reserved for recurring items/actions such as as "Upload, Print..". ...


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Even though this is an older post, the core issue remains. ChrisF makes a valid point--core functionality of the Web browser shouldn't be disabled unless absolutely necessary. Also, adding text instructions may often be overlooked/ignored by users. A good possible solution is to incorporate some JavaScript that will alert the user if they attempt to use ...


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Depending on a couple of factors: Assuming the user lands on a study case only from within your website, you can omit the title in the "Previous" and eliminate the repetitive entities in the next, e.g "Next: Brand 2" instead of "Next: [CASE STUDY BRAND 2]" Assuming that you go social and there is a case that the user lands on the study case from other ...


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Like with most questions like this, the tl;dr is: It depends. The correct navigational pattern is largely contingent upon three things: App structure (IA) Leaf page functionality (IxD) Desire to enforce prioritization by the product team (Organizational) App structure If your app is structured such that you can support fewer than 5 first-tier leaf ...


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You have already highlighted the core functionality of tab navigation and off canvas menu. The only drawback I could think of with such design is the screen estate available for the actual content. However mobile phones are getting bigger so I don't think this would be an issue in the future. Whether to implement off-canvas or tab navigation or both ...


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I think your layout approach is a common one, therefore usability issues would be minimum. Alternatively, you could nest the sub links inside the off-canvas menu too. This navigation layout gives the user a complete view of the site hierarchy and user can reach their destination with lesser clicks. download bmml source – Wireframes created with ...


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For a complex branching system, you could explore using a dynamic wizard. You don't have to construct the entire flow (start to end) since the steps are going to change dramatically based on what the user keyed in. Where should we tell the user that they are about to over-write everything past this point? When they start entering information into a ...


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You should not do this. Users know about the back button. "The Back button is the lifeline of the Web user and the second-most used navigation feature (after following hypertext links)". Jakob Nielsen in 1999. Or a Firefox study in 2010: "Across Windows, Mac and Linux 93.1 percent of users clicked the button at least once over the course of a five-day ...


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People sometimes get confused between whether it actually goes back in browser, or goes back to a preset page, for example if it just links to another page that the website thinks you've visited.


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My best solution is to use two full page divs position:absolute to the center of the page. I list down the main categories in the first and when clicked the other div slides in with the further navigations, which can be dynamically changed with jQuery. Use CSS3 transform for all these, and let JS handle the content change, that's it. Accordions make the site ...


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If I may suggest a slight change of direction: The layout you provide in the question (I'll call it the "read screen") is tied to a top-level report category - "Local Catalog Maintenance" in this case. If no top-level category is has been selected by the user, you'd want to show a different view entirely. Typically this would be a "index screen" of some ...


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It's hard to provide a reasonable solution without exactly knowing what content you have on this sub navigation's. It would be great if you can provide more information. Anyway here are some basic ideas you may want to consider: Use icons instead of long names A vertical navigation on the left side A dropdown as you suggested yourself is also an option as ...


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Suggestion 1: Anticipatory design: I would recommend pushing the user to one of the selections based on the data you get from your users. Which one is the hottest zone. Suggestion 2: Matrix Solution: You can present the user with the first 2 option he has in your platform. Blue pill: Results Red pull: Reports + a little description for each.


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I think placing a in page back button will not harm your usability. In fact it will support novice users which are still unaware of the browsers back button. It will surely not harm your website, it can only improve it.


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I mostly agree with adamsoh. Some audiences may need more 'spoon feeding' than others to navigate around though. In which case I would consider offering some extra on-screen navigation. If you’re worried the site may need that ‘back button’ there’s a good chance your gut feeling is correct.


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If your intention is to duplicate the exact same feature as the browser back button, then I would say a customize back button is a bit redundant. I can think of situation whereby a customize back button would be problematic. Say you access a subpage via url or bookmark, then the back button makes no sense at all. You also risk confusing the users on their ...


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Since Reset All has the same color as Date Picker and Filter By I expect it to affect these two fields. However, I'm not sure because there is no other visual grouping of Reset All with these fields. Also taking into account it has the same color as other elements, including the buttons, I really can only guess what it will do. That said, this design needs ...


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Since the "Reset All" is not visibly connected to any of the dropdowns I would say it returns the top bar to the default state. One suggestion is perhaps to hide the Export and Email button under a share icon. I would also make the Reset All into a button kinda like the Export CSV but with a nice reddish tone to indicate a "irreversible action".


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Given the picture you provided, I would expect the large date text ("Sun, 25 Oct 2015") as well as any changes in the Date Picker and Filter By to return to the values they were when the page was loaded. I would, however, not expect the table sort toggles to be reset. This is because of your use of white space and proximity as well as font style, the "reset ...


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Wow this is a crazy coincidence! I literally had this same problem today trying to design a two-level deep filter in iOS and tried stacking segmented controls. It didn't get positive feedback and we ended up restructuring the information into different areas. I kept one segmented control (very similar to Android's tabs) that only changed the view underneath ...


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Android navigation belongs at the top The Material Guidelines are pretty clear on that subject. Aside from the bizarre usability of it, putting navigation at the bottom is solidly associated with iOS. In-context navigation may be the answer In a three-level situation like this, it's common to dive down to a dedicated page and use the "up arrow" control ...


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If your goal is to increase the clicks for "Link4" you could do two things: Contrast the "Link4" button against the others by making the background color different - for example orange or green provide good affordances. Move "Link4" to the leftmost or rightmost position. People can easily spot the first and last option in a list. In this case visual search ...


1

There are several reasons to not add a tooltip that says 'Click...': It adds no reason for the user to take an action. It provides no context. They can click anywhere on the screen at any time. Why should the be interested in clicking that particular link? What is special about it? It's non-standard approach for prompting a user to take an action on a ...


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The call to action doesn't have to be directly under the link. Consider another option, to include a banner on top of the menu that links to the same page as link 4. Doesn't block the sub navi links.


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I believe a good UI should be adaptive to user behaviour. I'm more likely to go with persistent tab behaviour for the following scenarios: You want to save the user last session (tabs opened) before they logged out The tabs contain form elements User wants to compare content from different providers, it will be frustrating for the user if the tabs keep ...


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I think a red (or another strong color) circle before or after the link label would be sufficient to draw attention, but since the stakeholders thought of text bubbles, they might want something more appealing to the user. In this case, I'd use a corner ribbon with a strong color and contrast between the background and the text color, or animate the button ...


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Consider providing the ability to easily sort the list by either "Invoiced Amount" or "Days Past Due", in addition to providing both data points on each line item. This empowers users to push the items they are most interested in to the top, instead of scanning the entire list searching certain icons, colors, or number ranges. As a starting point, given the ...


1

I think there is a clue in the name, Call To Action. In your example, the call to action for a page about an online community would be "Join our team" or "Sign up" or "Join our community" -- so the rule would be that there should be a verb and a reference back to the content of the headline and/or page. There's an excellent article by Paul Boag with 10 ...


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Pervasive navigation. Pervasive navigation refers to nav links that are on almost all pages. They might be two-level tabs like in Amazon, or Windows-like dropdown/flyout menus. You can refer this for more research and navigation understanding. http://www.webstyleguide.com/wsg3/6-page-structure/3-site-design.html


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Primary navigation are usually the main categories of a sitemap. Pervasive navigation are links that you want user to access easily and they persist across most (if not all) pages such as search, home. I suppose primary navigation could be pervasive as well such as links on the header.


0

How about putting each section inside a dropdown menu so only one section show sin full at a time, it will reduce clutter drastically and allow the user to find what he/she needs fairly quickly


1

Based on the UI attached, I'm assuming that you are toying with the idea of progressive disclosure; meaning some form of user activation to reveal the items that are available. There are circumstances whereby progressive disclosure would fit slightly better, such as form filling, check out process etc. In this case (a menu), a progressive approach would ...


1

I would choose the 2 buttons approach, for these reasons. 1) The "Book" label gives the impression that you are booking a private ride service, more often associated with a personal car ride. It will be slightly inappropriate to say that you are booking a bus service assuming you will be sharing the bus ride other commuters. 2) As one of your team member ...


0

Option #1 would be your best choice. Disabling sub-categories in response to category selection would allow the user to quickly see how their category choice effects the available sub-categories. In the example below, if I am ultimately looking for results in sub-category "Five" (which is currently disabled / greyed out), the interface suggests that I ...


1

How about having two separate tabs, one for booking a car, another for buying a bus ticket. Both tabs would be laid out as similarly as possible. The button at the end would then say "BOOK CAR" or "BUY TICKET" as appropriate. That way, the user knows which option they have chosen, but the UI is the same. Consider what Google Maps does when you ask for ...


2

My answer could be a litle of topic, but I want to share my thougts to this anyway. The first question is, what does the user want. Does she want to book a car od buy a bus ticket or does she want to get from location A to location B an choose the better service. To choose the better service she would have to know the time it takes an the costs for each ...


2

There cannot be a clear cut answer until one can see the entire flow of the application , where is the user coming from where does the user go etc from the mentioned screen. One Button Pros - No confusion , user knows what to do. Where to tap to go forward. Cons - Another screen , trust me more and more screens can frustrate the user. Popup screen to ...


1

Considering your flow, I think a single button is the way to go. What happens afterwards is the key. You should be displaying the available options for both scenarios instantly. The sorting of the options can be adjusted based on the more common use cases. Moreover, as a next step, you could create flows and UIs to suggest bus riders to try the car ...


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There are no hard rules here, so lets take a look at examples and see whether they make sense as a primary navigation in one particular case.


4

Even if you set your site up so that breadcrumb links are "history" rather than "hierarchy", you should make them normal links. Doing anything else violates the user expectation that, after clicking a link, the "back" button will "un-click" the link. Your proposed system makes it so that they need to click the forward button instead.


4

TL;DR Main menu leads the user, while breadcrumbs are following him. They relate like a GPS navigator and a GPS tracker. Main navigation supports and helps to form user's mental model of what is on the site. It has constant structure and is presented on the same place, with the same information. It's very reliable and consistent mean for navigational tasks. ...



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