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8

Can you support auto save in this context? As long as users don't experiment with the data it would smooth the process. Make it even faster by providing a key sequence for the next button. If that would work, you can just have a status indication immediately adjacent to a 'next item' button, like the pattern illustrated below. If you need to allow undoing ...


4

Your intuitions have merit -- if it is confusing to you as a developer to have two menu items of the same name, rest assured that it would also be confusing to your users. In this case, the word "View" or "View All" can be used to enumerate this action, for instance: Contacts View All Additional Fields Sub Category I would also hesitate to make your ...


3

It all depends on the app itself and users' expectations. For instance, users expect Facebook's desktop website to always show: Friend requests Their messages New notifications The other options are hidden in menus and sub-menus. So, it's a logical step for Facebook to match the desktop version with the app. If you have the screen space to place the ...


2

An animation when opening the menu probably likely won't negatively affect the usability much (the user still knows where to click the menu and expects a menu to open). An animation does add some "delight" to the experience because it makes the transition visually smooth and it helps the user follow along with what they selected. That said, if you are ...


2

The general approach tends to be "Save" and "Next". There's an implicit assumption that the wizard saves when you move onto the next step. You can probably make it more clear by showing a "saved" notification "toast" message on the screen. To be clearer, consider the following set "< Previous" "Save" "Next >"


2

A tough question Benny. I read an article a few years ago that talked about online papers versus hardcopy papers. It didn't answer your question unfortunately however it did make this interesting quote: The paper cites other researchers on the subject who have theorized that the layout of online pages—which often insert ads mid-story or force readers to ...


2

It is likely to give the content more height to work with. The various ui elements at the top and bottom of the screen, menu, address bar, favourite, other toolbar, footer, start-bar/dock and you end up with a very letter boxed view of the content. Particularly as websites depend on scrolling and don't have control of these other desktop level ui ...


1

The user story here would be: As a user, I'd like to easily locate to the next field where my action is required. Now there are many ways to satisfy this, but also quite a few assumptions being made. Visual inspection anyone? One of them, is simply by visual inspection. If you know a bit about visual cognition, you can design the interface in such ...


1

I am afraid that the UX world depends on which your users are and therefore the true answer is that there are no solutions to your problem. There are only costs and benefits on choosing either one design or the other but this depends on the users. You should get in touch with them by doing ux research in order to get the proper insights that will guide your ...


1

You basically have a two-level navigation hierarchy. That's not unusual. Let's start with the Mobify approach: The Mobify approach is reasonable if you want to constrain users to a single panel, or if you think users will want to jump around the hierarchy frequently so they won't have the patience for a slide-in animation. It's also useful if you want ...


1

You're trying to create what's probably the single most common mobile design pattern, namely drilldown navigation :). You're saying that when you click the arrow, the submenu slides on top of the current one, and from your mockup it appears that the top item leads back to the original menu. In other words, when you click an item, you see the list of the ...


1

I think there are two primary reasons for this: Historical When news services started putting content online, they focused on the differentiating factors of online news services vs print services. That meant focusing on up to the minute news rather than a curated selection of news which had been chosen to give a recap of the previous day's news. ...


1

From experience, consumers have come to expect digital technology to be buggy and complicated. Many have experienced the inability to get a new product to work, both at home and at work. Thus, I speculate, consumers may be reassured to see you offer support. They may be encouraged to get something knowing you’ll be there after the acquisition to help them if ...



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