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10

What creates confusion i.m.o. is the back and the close button being on the same level in the visual hierarchy where as they act on different levels. Wouldn't it be more clear when the close button is visually more separated from the back button? I would not recommend moving the previous/back button and replace it with a close button, because now the user ...


8

I would encourage you to consider whether a cancel button is truly necessary in this situation. What is the likelihood that the user will wish to cancel their entire submission? Is it more likely that the user would wish to change pieces of the submission more easily accessible using the back navigation rather than the entire submission? Will other ...


6

I find the second version confusing. I think that the same button should be placed at the same place in the different screens. But I have to say that I find the first option confusing as well. To me, the button on the left should go back and the button on the right should go forward. Maybe it is a good idea to give us some more information of the rest of ...


4

Hamburger menus, like it or not, are widely recognized Inertia: everyone else is doing it, so we did it and now it's done (until the next major redesign/funding come along) Burgers take up very little space and lend themselves to being tucked into a corner of the screen In many instances, they are effective I want to address that last item in particular. ...


4

Generally, for mobiles, breadcrumbs are not recommended; the back button is what the users are familiar with. Also, it is said that; if your app needs a breadcrumb then your app is not easy to use. Even though, if you really want to introduce one - try what Windows does for the deep hierarchies:


3

Mouse-click is always better than mouse-hover, because mouse-click allows you to support all keyboard users, those who may or may not need accessibility support. It also helps you transition to touch-based devices like Tablets and Smartphones where you don't use a mouse, i.e. tap triggers the mouse-click. So benefits all round when you use mouse-click and ...


3

If you're looking for user friendly, then browser's back button should suffice, it's a known and expected behavior, and for one level navigation, it's what most users will look for. Now, if you want to keep context, you could use a modal window, but that will also depend on the content you have for those services and also the kind of behavior you're looking ...


3

Both (hamburger and nav bar) have advantages and disadvantages that make them suitable in particular contexts. It very much comes down to how much value your users get from functionality that you consider for your main navigation, and more objectively, how often they use that functionality. Spotify is a great example where a nav bar makes a lot of sense: ...


3

Well as you are having a gaming portal, I suggest:- Arrange them by popularity Try to give an option to the user to compare between 2 games like we can see in the websites which compares different mobile phones. 3.The most important-> While displaying a particular game product- you can put Pro's, Con's and compatibility as the definite items to be ...


3

You can always try the MultiLevel Push Menu which works fine for all the devices you mention and has very clear and easy to follow hierarchies. Additionally, you could also use Responsive Multilevel Menu which is more or less the same, only that not taking the whole vertical space


3

I encountered an issue similar to this with a shopping app where the cards for items were a perfect fraction of the page space meaning that the last item on the page in its default state ended just clear of the fold (page break). During user testing most users reported that there was a lack of items available because they didn't realise they could scroll ...


3

Whether it's the hamburger menu or the menu bar, navigation should be consistent throughout your system. This features throughout most accessibility guidelines, is good for SEO, and is just generally good practice.


2

Drill down means you show only one menu at a time. It brings you further down the menu structure. An example is the iPod menu: Or see this working example in jQuery. A hierarchical multi-level menu is more like a dropdown or accordion menu where the whole submenu structure is visible: Accordion example: Or as dropdown menu: An example in bootstrap


2

My answer only applies to Android, as I am lacking any long term usage experience with iOS. Add step forward and backward buttons on the bottom (if this is a wizard like screen), Add the familiar "steps" dots on the bottom too. Provide swipe gestures to go forwards and backwards too. Please do not attempt to create a general solution for Android and iOS! ...


2

Left sidebar occupies prominent space on the screen so the value / utility it provides should be high. The question then is what's the distribution of number of different products a single user has (or more simply how many products a user has on average). And the second question would be how much your users switch between different products? One extreme is ...


2

If you want to make it available to "dig deeper infinitely through the application", it's really gonna be difficult to use. But if there are only 2 or 3 levels of hierarchies, you can do some indentations. (courtesy of IMDb app) The screenshot here only has two levels, but if you want to go deeper, you could have a sub-level with more indentation. (Just ...


2

You could test your users, or review other sites, especially your competitors and see what they do. Make a spreadsheet and examine your results. If everyone: on-line merchants,banks, and other sites all do the same thing - then that would be a good choice as it would be the industry standard. The two choices I see most often (correct me if I'm wrong) are: ...


2

If you let if run full width, the text will be very annoying to read. The ideal line length is somewhere between 50 and 100 characters. You could increase the font, sure, but then you'd have to move your head more. So we try to keep text lines shorter. And left aligned with a huge amount of whitespace on the right is just ugly.


1

You cannot use mouse-hover on touch screens like tablets and large smartphones, and mouse-hover presents accessibility challenges. Hover also frustrates people if it is triggered by accident, or involves unknown interactions, i.e. hover for 1 second, and can be difficult to use with precision if the hover region is small, etc. So it is much better to use an ...


1

You can use "breadcrumbs" which is very common and useful. It takes less space(unless you style it heavily) and users can easily navigate to various pages.


1

To expand on the answer given by @PixelSnader there are also occupational health and safety (OH&S) implications regarding head movement. There is a lot of research indicating that while sitting at a computer the screen should be set up so that you can read the screen with very little movement of your head, neck and shoulders. If a website was designed ...


1

What you're describing sounds like the "Tab" + menu UI used on the Semantic UI framework, specifically on this page. The behavior of the tabs and the right menu seems pretty similar to what you're describing. http://semantic-ui.com/modules/tab.html#/definition


1

I don't know a specific name for the style, but it seems to be a fixed div with in-page navigation. You put a fixed div at the top of the page with a menu and then each div is named such as <a name="Section 1" /> Then, at the top of your page, in the menu bar (your fixed ), you'd put the link to that section: <a href=”#Section ...


1

If you're looking for something that is literally repeated throughout the content of the page then I don't know that there is a specific name for it but I would call it something like "Repeated inline navigation", maybe? If you're looking for something that has the navigation locked to a certain position (usually the top of the window) and updates based on ...


1

I would try something like "Top bar", "Navigation top bar", "Scrolling nav" or something like that. I don't know if it is official name, but it describes it good. These pages are using something like it: http://andy-hook.co.uk/ https://2015.avocode.com/


1

Just so that you can have a clearer idea about the reasons for the comments, think about two different types of websites, one is mostly informational (i.e. lots of text, images, etc.) while the other is transactional (i.e. lots of workflows, buttons and call-to-actions). Lets look at the informational site first. If your content is mostly short snippets of ...


1

I'm sure there are other concerns, but the first one that comes to my mind is that the app should be designed to minimize the input of number and letters, as it is usually very cumbersome on this type of device... When it is absolutely necessary to let users input letters/numbers, I would use smart defaults (popular choices for instance), autocompletion or ...


1

I can't see any problem. You have a wheel that can be turn front/back. And push button. You can easily prototype such interface by simulating scrolling by tab/shift+tab and push like enter button. The main thing is to put all elements in proper order (like tab index) and clearly highlight which button is selected currently.


1

I think it's very confuse having the back and cancel button in the same bar. I would suggest to add a bottom bar to navigate along the next/previous, so you can have a cancel button on the top consistently along the whole process.


1

I have got over this issue by using a 3 stage left nav & used the hamburger to toggle states, user preference is a key factor as you don't want to hide something from a user who has no experience with that type of nav check out the Google analytics nav for a good example of a simple layered left nav. I prefer the left nav approach personally although ...



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