Hot answers tagged

8

What creates confusion i.m.o. is the back and the close button being on the same level in the visual hierarchy where as they act on different levels. Wouldn't it be more clear when the close button is visually more separated from the back button? I would not recommend moving the previous/back button and replace it with a close button, because now the user ...


8

In my experience, I tend to use ampersands in any title, and the word "and" in sentences and other body content. So in your case, I would likely use "Logs & Statistics" in the menu. In my opinion, visually it makes the titles look more concise. This has the additional benefit of saving precious real estate in something like a navigation menu as ...


8

It used to be that arrows were preferred as they provided a visual cue to users there was more to the menu if they clicked on / hovered over them. Over time web developers started making these menus activate on both a click and hover, in which case the arrows aren't necessary as users by default will click or tap on a menu item. If doing so then reveals a ...


7

Keep it consistent. According to Nielsen's Top 10 Information Architecture (IA) Mistakes: Inconsistent Navigation Navigation exists to help users, not to be a puzzle in its own right. Users should be able to understand it immediately, and apply that understanding throughout the site. Sadly, lots of sites change their navigation features as users move ...


7

Forget mobile breakpoints, there's no phone and tablet sizes outside marketing. Breakpoints should follow the content, not the screen size. As a simple example, let's consider the menu: Home | Products | Contacts Do you think you should ever provide a mobile menu? Do you really want to stick three elements in a hamburger menu? They can probably fit ...


7

I would encourage you to consider whether a cancel button is truly necessary in this situation. What is the likelihood that the user will wish to cancel their entire submission? Is it more likely that the user would wish to change pieces of the submission more easily accessible using the back navigation rather than the entire submission? Will other ...


6

I find the second version confusing. I think that the same button should be placed at the same place in the different screens. But I have to say that I find the first option confusing as well. To me, the button on the left should go back and the button on the right should go forward. Maybe it is a good idea to give us some more information of the rest of ...


5

The good and bad of bottom nav Bottom nav was a great idea when Apple first came out with it. Steve was laser-focused on one-handed usability. The bottom nav was designed to accommodate fast and convenient view switching where the mobile use case seemed to demand it. Unfortunately, bottom nav is a hierarchy nightmare when used for an app's main info ...


4

Question 1: Back button is totally needed! There is a few reasons for this. With a back button, you ensure consistancy accross devices and browsers. Each browser could have the button in different places, different shapes or even hidden in a submenu. Essentially, you maintain control of the experience. Not all user uses the back button in browser, myself ...


3

You can always try the MultiLevel Push Menu which works fine for all the devices you mention and has very clear and easy to follow hierarchies. Additionally, you could also use Responsive Multilevel Menu which is more or less the same, only that not taking the whole vertical space


3

In short, primary navigation is the main hierarchical navigation, while pervasive navigation is always on the page. For obvious reason there is a lot of overlap but it's not absolute. Let's say 99% of primary navigation is pervasive, and 50% of pervasive is primary. Analogy; 99% of cars are vehicles (some are scrap, or art or marketing) and 50% of vehicles ...


3

How about not using the pointer at all but switch controls directly as the user scrolls. So by example if your application has two buttons horizontally in a row and an input down below scrolling left and right will toggle between the buttons and scrolling down will toggle between the input and the last button selected. I remember to have seen this on ...


3

I think you should reconsider the bottom navigation: Bottom navigation is very well established in mobile apps, far more so than top navigation, and there is good reason for this. In most cases i disagree with your point about incorrect information hierarchy - the content takes prime visual position in the interface, and the navigation is simply a tool for ...


3

Can you? Sure. Should you? That comes down branding. There are multiple opinion pieces out there related to the use of "and" vs. ampersand. The question has been asked over on English.SE before and has a fair number of very good answers: When to use & instead of “and” Grammatically it is generally seen as less formal. Unless space is a consideration, ...


2

One line answer to this is the Usability of choosing that position. When you hold your mobile in hand, your thumb immediately gets into action and the bottom position is easily accessible to it than the top. In the era of large screen devices it's difficult to hold the phone in hand and access the navigation placed on top. Which is why Apple has changed ...


2

I would not recommend to use any "AND" or "&", instead trying to find one level up terminology (Ex: reports) will be better. I would like to ask; Why do you need to combine logs and statistics into one section? Why do users visit this section, what is the main intent? These questions can help you to find generic menu item terminology.


2

If your portfolio is going to target tech savvy and creative people, I guess its ok to go experimental. A diagonal or a more unique approach would impress this group of user. However if you intend to show your website to a broader group of users, you might want to tread on the safe side. A more conventional layout such as layout 3 would appeal to them and ...


2

I would consider the type of data you're collecting. If several fields relate (e.g. city, state, country), then horizontally is appropriate (and, in my opinion, preferred as it tips me off that they are grouped for a reason). This would help condense the form a bit and allow a user to keep their hands on the keyboard longer before needing to scroll, thereby ...


2

My understanding is that people visually have a preference towards reading columns or shorter text. But apparently, people actually read better with a little wider text. (I dont know if this is completely true when dealing with forms). (See point 18): http://www.graphics.com/article-old/how-people-read Susan Weinschenk PhD. - Behavioral Psychologist I ...


2

Your concern is warranted. The right hand column is often filled with ads, so users have been trained to ignore the right hand column. This also agrees with the widely cited empirical data that shows that users typical scan a page in an 'F pattern.' The following article by the Neilson Norman Group (a reputable authority on usability) gives some pointers on ...


2

I encountered an issue similar to this with a shopping app where the cards for items were a perfect fraction of the page space meaning that the last item on the page in its default state ended just clear of the fold (page break). During user testing most users reported that there was a lack of items available because they didn't realise they could scroll ...


2

Drill down means you show only one menu at a time. It brings you further down the menu structure. An example is the iPod menu: Or see this working example in jQuery. A hierarchical multi-level menu is more like a dropdown or accordion menu where the whole submenu structure is visible: Accordion example: Or as dropdown menu: An example in bootstrap


1

My answer only applies to Android, as I am lacking any long term usage experience with iOS. Add step forward and backward buttons on the bottom (if this is a wizard like screen), Add the familiar "steps" dots on the bottom too. Provide swipe gestures to go forwards and backwards too. Please do not attempt to create a general solution for Android and iOS! ...


1

I think it's very confuse having the back and cancel button in the same bar. I would suggest to add a bottom bar to navigate along the next/previous, so you can have a cancel button on the top consistently along the whole process.


1

Your question seems to be based on an assumption that you have to choose between the two. If it was me, I'd give the user the option of how they'd like the navigation to work. This will empower them and either meet or exceed their expectations. Either way, the user experience will be enhanced as a result. EDIT However, you will need to ensure that your ...


1

The reliance of your users on the current project and the frenquency at which switching project occurs is going to dictate the design chose here. At first glance this one works best. The space remains manageable and should allow you to make it work for more desktop/tablet screen sizes. This is however very dependant on the content of the tasks as well, if it ...


1

Breadcrumbs are useful when people are navigating very hierarchically organized information, such as in Windows Explorer: when browsing the file system, they want to know where they are and easily navigate a level up. A programmer's IDE (such as my IntelliJ IDEA) is another example. In other desktop applications such as Word or Photoshop you don't find ...



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