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48

It's become standard because everyone does it. Everyone does it because it's nice to have a 'home' link but it's not something that needs to clutter the menu, either. Hence the idea to just make the logo link to the home page. Not sure if anyone can answer where this was first seen. But I recall doing it close to 2 decades ago so I think its been around ...


46

Where was this first seen This practice dates back at least to the earliest days of image hyperlinks. For example, the Internet Archive's earliest snapshot of Yahoo's home page from October 1996 has a clickable Yahoo! logo. Why has it become an industry standard? 1. Convention Conventions are self-perpetuating. Given the ubiquity of this practice, ...


7

It sounds like your real problem isn’t designing how to show a link is non-reversible. Your real problem is your app has committed the cardinal sin of breaking the Back button, which is an issue going beyond how you mark links in each list item. Solving the Real Problem Solutions, from most to least preferred: Fix the Back button. Okay, you say that the ...


7

TL;DR. NO. "You want a ‘regular’ site, but squeezed onto your grandaughter’s phone." The icons are a symptom of our collective failure to wholeheartedly embrace all aspects of the mobile-first approach. Long version: Let's discuss the 3x3 9-dots icon and the hamburger icon (navicons) simultaneously because they're both the most controversial techniques ...


3

It seems like yours is a moderately to deep hierarchy problem. In this case, you can take hint from Khan Academy. They too have Subjects > Categories > Sub-categories > More sub categories Each subcategory usually has a longer description. Clicking on subjects reveals a list of subjects, which in turn shows a list of sub-categories on hover. ...


2

The answer to this question is simple, and is the answer for pretty much any "why don't we do it this way" question: You should do what makes sense for your users to digest your content in the most effective way. This may mean a left-hand nav for your app, but a one-size-fits-all model will not be effective for all users across all applications. Your best ...


2

Accessible checkboxes usually require two operations to control: first the user needs to 'focus' the checkbox (usually by using the 'tab' key to move through the interface until they reach the right control) and then they need to change the state of the checkbox (usually using the 'space' key). Sighted users will skip through the page using visual cues such ...


2

The sticky header should contain tools or information that are so important for the website that you need to access them from everywhere at any given time. This could be the search and their settings on Google, your money amount on an online banking website or current running popular livestreams on Twitch while searching for something to watch. Facebook ...


2

I believe the simplest answer to the primary question is based on the following logic: If it didn't link to the home page, then where else? If it didn't link anywhere, wouldn't that be a waste? It's desirable to hyperlink anything that can logically and unambiguously be linked in the context. Therefore I would say it is no accident of ...


1

I think this particular icon is known as the "App Drawer Icon" If I am not wrong, the trend started with the app drawer icon acting as the launcher for apps on Android and Blackberry, particularly on Nexus and Samsung mobile phones (in early days) Since then, it has been adopted as a launcher icon for a list of apps. Edit (based on my comments and other ...


1

The images themselves tell you what format the menu will have. In these cases, grid layout that is common amongst web applications today, in the case of the three lines, that's usually a menu with a list style of some sort. I think 4 dots is definitely overkill, you can get the point across with 3. It has little to do with the content and more to do with ...


1

The existing answers claim that it is done merely because it has become a self fulfilling standard. That may be partially true but neither are UX answers and they miss out why it is intuitive. A user often clicked on a site logo to get to your site, so it is consistent and makes perfect sense for any click on the same logo to take you back to that same ...


1

The criteria varies and the usual answer is "it depends". I go by this principle, If the user has to scroll or do complex interactions to get to UI:A on PAGE:A just to interact and navigate to PAGE:B then make UI:A sticky. Its made up, and origin is common sense. But then, sites like medium.com have a variation of this sticky top bar. When a user ...


1

I have seen horizontal navs with a great many options in them and they can be made to work fairly effectively The example I have here is from "maplin.co.uk" - an electronics store that has many "departments" each with it's own set of 'sub departments':


1

As you've discovered, the iOS Human Interface Guidelines document (or HIG) makes no mention of an accordion, however they do refer to the UITableView. This StackOverflow question gets the credit for that. There are also other accordion solutions, such as this one on YouTube. But I think your question isn't "How do I do this" but "Is it OK to do this?" That ...


1

Tabs may take up more real estate, but many apps have been using a pattern that while scrolling down the page, the tabs (or any subheader/button-bar) will slide up behind the main header. A simple scroll towards the top of the page will reveal the tabs. This still allows the user to know where they are within the app, but will give a thumb's worth more of ...


1

Many modern website designs that eschew vertical left navigation menus use one or more of the following instead: Hidden hamburger menus Simple horizontal navigation at the top of the page Long single-column content Targeted call-to-action buttons Those design decisions help maintain focus on the content and allow each page to deliver information with a ...


1

The short answer is it depends. On a basic website with a handful of pages, breadcrumbs are certainly unnecessary. But on larger sites (especially reference and documentation sites), breadcrumbs are extremely useful for navigation and orientation—one might even say they're downright necessary. The hard part is determining whether your site is large enough to ...



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