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6

1. Use an existing convention Typically, the 'more' is represented by 3 stacked lines or 'hamburger' as designers call it... Sometimes, a set of 3 dots, horizontally- or vertically- aligned represents this, 2. Create a hybrid You can create some unique variation of this icon by combining your business brand with this universal web design symbol! 3. Do ...


3

This is very much an "it depends" kind of question; as posed there's no single "correct" answer. Is the lengthy article something that users are likely to read continuously, from beginning to end? If so, intra-article navigation may not be necessary at all, and if included should be backgrounded rather than made persistently available so it doesn't ...


2

Everything depends on purpose of Website. What all information or content present on website decides footer Links/Content. But am not here to just say "depends!" So presuming your friends' startup would need the website more importantly for media-marketing and is not website based startup(guessed from number of pages). Rule of thumb for UX: More ...


2

If the information is duplicated in the footer, it becomes redundant. So, scrap it. You're right. There's no point in showing everything twice.


2

This is a fantastic candidate for a highly interactive data visualization. Once I got to the map, I thought, YES, this is what tells the story. My criticism of the current setup is that it is a pogo-sticking workflow that forces you down a path then up and out again if you want to either get an overview or learn more about a specific thing. That's not ...


2

Question and answers here are old, but the challenges when it comes to some kind of multi level mobile navigation are timeless. The most obvious choice is the NavigationDrawer (left sliding menu). It’s the prefered pattern if you have really complex and feature rich structure from the beginning. Another scenario is when you are just starting and need the ...


2

As far as making the buttons stand out and look clickable compared to their surroundings, I think you've succeeded pretty well :-) I would personally choose your side-by-side setup, especially if you're already dealing with the subject of categories and sub-categories. Your second setup risks implying the hierarchy between both. Having both options next to ...


2

Yea! This approach will work because its obvious what you are trying to do :) You are even using the particular color of the navigation as the background color. Nice move. Maybe consider dimming or decreasing the saturation of the other menu options when the user is navigating through a particular parent/menu option? If you want to read about mobile ...


2

The more menu on a bottom navigation menu is actually a rather common navigation pattern. Yelp, Yahoo fantasy football, Band are a few apps just on my phone that use this navigation paradigm. There are pros and cons to any navigation approach, the main con of a bottom navigation bar being that it uses more screen real estate than say your typical off ...


1

The notion that you have "2 home pages" is your problem. Your website has one homepage. It can have 2 major sub-sections (or 3, or 4, ...) under that homepage. Your logo should take the user to the homepage, from which the user can navigate to the sub-section they need. Proper page design should allow you to have a very clear navigational structure that ...


1

It all depends If this is for a main page, then you can (and probably should) have this redundancy. Not because of discovery or hidden links issues or whatever, but because this is a homepage where some specific links (specially something like "Services") are the reason of the whole site/app to exist, so you give them more visibility. Now, if your link ...


1

I would suggest: Separating each list item in the nav visually in order to create a better on-page information architecture Organizing the information into a hierarchy. For example, all response time items could come under one heading and all volume types could come under another heading. This would allow you to have shorter list items and reduce ...


1

Generally speaking Apple is the opposite of Windows. The reasons for this go back a long way, and it's Windows that didn't think about it, they simply wanted to do it the opposite to the Mac. I say this because it's useful to understand that some initial thought went into the order of affirming an action, or escaping from it. Apple's designers decided we ...


1

Nick Butcher, a Google Design/Development Advocate, has addressed this in this presentation: https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos/+NickButcher/albums/5981768132040708401/5981768199164803938?pid=5981768199164803938&oid=118292708268361843293 : "Selecting a section in the drawer should reset your task back stack". Also, the reason why the back button does ...


1

Tabs have their pros and cons. The user flows for creating reports do not have to be the same as the user flows for editing an existing report. For example, when you create a new report, maybe consider using a multi-step wizard (no tabs) to guide the user though the task, but when you edit an existing report you can now use a tab view. Are you able to do ...


1

If you want to know the best solution from a user experience perspective, create mock-ups of a couple of those options and test them with a few people (you can use simple mock-ups to test design ideas) - you don't need to test with many people, and you will soon see which option one works best. I only say this because I work with Enterprise software and it ...


1

Lea, instead of low contrast for the first and last tab, you can hide arrows. just my 2 cent, https://au.pinterest.com/pin/180284791312274083/ instead of showing complete tab, I hide half the first and last 'navigation tab' so that user can understand/curious there are more links. It is not a big issue, but just sharing an option. (*sorry for the link, i've ...


1

Thanks to a colleague at work I've finally found a solution : The source link : https://material.angularjs.org/latest/demo/tabs


1

Congratulations - you have discovered one of the major challenges with Tabs :-) One part of the challenge is based on how you construct the Tab (I am assuming this is HTML), e.g. if you use CSS to set the width of the tab you will have problems (it is better not to set a width and let the container adopt its width based on its text content). If you are ...



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