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I saw this tweet yesterday. Where did the now ubiquitous hamburger menu icon ≡ come from? Xerox—already in 1981 http://t.co/1fSOIYDvM4 by @geoffa pic.twitter.com/nWDI8E0ClX— Antti Latva-Koivisto (@anttilk) 30 maart 2014 Although Xerox seems to be the first to use it on computer, there is no definite data (yet) on who used it on the ...


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I think you should put a Home link. As you said: 'the page is not fully fluid, so that the logo might even disappear on smaller screens.' So in this case you should consider adding a home link when the logo is gone, otherwise it is not so important. The users of the site will adapt to the design, and they will find the link in the right side aswell. IMO ...


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An idea - did you consider putting dropdown menus into the breadcrumbs? It could look like this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


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As JonW said; i think you trying to ask if it's a good idea to put it in the upper left and I think not. There are ergonomic issues with placing things there (see picture below). A swipe from left to right could work however and is a common pattern (though you should still inform the user about the whereabouts of the navigation). Placing a commonly used ...


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The design is a rather eccentric amalgamation of design approaches. The idea that delivery of the content is somewhat similar to how Quartz does it. The site’s navigation is seem to be centered around the ever-present scrolling selection of stories in a left hand site on larger desktop screens or an expandable menu with a tap on smaller mobile screen. Like ...


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http://thenextweb.com/dd/2014/04/08/ux-designers-side-drawer-navigation-costing-half-user-engagement/?utm_content=buffer044a9&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer http://www.exquisitetweets.com/collection/lukew/2919 http://exisweb.net/mobile-menu-abtest The hamburger icon and it's affordance has been hot topic for ...


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Actually, my company recently did a bunch of field research, and the results were completely mixed, even across age and experience -- most knew of the symbol, but most misinterpreted its meaning. We hypothesized this happens because of how the symbol is used across larger platforms such as Google Chrome and Facebook, i.e., it's not always used to mean the ...


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Within my specific constraints, I found a way to avoid the confusion. Some of the other answers suggest to use 'add' button in the list, or to pin it below the list . I cannot pin a fixed 'add' button at the end of my list because if the user scroll out of the list, another section has to be displayed below. So my only real option to show the button ...


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Normally you want to facilitate things to the user. A 2nd and 3rd level navigation is similar to a mega menu: it used to be good, but only make things hard and boring to the user. See an article about outdated UX patterns for more information on it. I think what you should aim here is to draw your user's flow. How they will interact with your website and ...


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It's actually a dashboard navigation pattern posing as a standard horizontal navigation menu. On both sites it's the 2nd-level navigation and it disappears once you drill down into one of the items - which is the dashboard navigation model. But in terms of visual design it's a regular horizontal menu. I think that in both cases it's not a great solution ...


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Typical practice is to use a combination of 1. and 3. The general descriptive text functions as an introduction. For the duplicate submenu, additional descriptors can be added so it differentiates from the existing navigation. And if the child items have a picture you can use that as a thumbnail as part of the submenu. If you'd like to leave it empty, I'd ...


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About the menu: I agree with Dave, that you could perhaps explore possibility to have it vertical, albeit you could gain more with simply restructuring and hoping you can fit all menu items in one row and still have only 2 levels. However, another alternative would be to have the top navigation contain only the most primary and sought after links that most ...


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I would entertain thinking slightly differently and exploring a vertical side navbar. Perhaps, provide some organization to the navigation links. Two or three categories may help the user better digest your offered nav topics. Also, the text does not need a shadow, the white on dark blue pops for pleasant reading. I hope this helps.


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It shouldn't be based on personal opinion, but on research for the best information architecture. The IA should be derived from the content (its volume and natural sectioning), and oriented by the target audience. Ask yourself a couple of guiding questions, and narrow it down a little. Who should use the website? What are they used to? What are the first ...


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Going to prefix this with i am a developer first and budding UX person second so some of the terminology may be off here. Putting this in an answer as it may be long, but any little helps i guess and may open up a debate. Maybe we are complicating the user model with the user flow. The current system model is the true system setup because everything is ...


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I think the dual dropdown menus may be a little confusing, since they appear to be conditional or part of the same form action (i.e. selection from first dropdown changes what's available in second dropdown, or any number of other assumptions). Would you consider moving the 3 sub-page links into your mobile navigation? It's very common to see sub-navigation ...



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