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57

Rumors of its death are greatly exaggerated ✞... Classic hierarchical folder views aren't dying. But they are being complemented by other ways of viewing and interacting with files. The key trend here is the decoupling of views from the underlying file system. The old world...One truth ⇨ One view Historically, file UX was heavily tied to the ...


38

It's not dying completely, but it is becoming a power user niche feature. Everyone has seen or heard stories about the user who stores everything on their desktop or in a single My Documents folder. Humans are terrible at justifying a large upfront cost like creating and managing dozens of folders just for a possible, small benefit in the future like being ...


12

Categorization of content is still very important, even after the rise of smartphones. Whether that's by date, by location, or by tags. The more and more popular use of smartphones since 2007 has forced designers to come up with simpler user experiences. Manually putting stuff in folders can usually be considered a bad ux experience, which is why in a lot ...


9

Probably. But it's a slow painful death. It essentially boils down to the need to put something somewhere where we can find it again, or where we can direct someone else to finding it. We are naturally predisposed to putting things in containers or compartmentalizing in such a way that even if it's a long time before we come back then we can still have a ...


6

As tools (software and hardware) increase in speed, the value of search begins to eclipse the value of a folder structure. On my PC, my MacBook, and my phone, it's simply faster to search for items by terminology rather than seek it out visually. Most file systems still need a folder structure, so it's not dying, it's just that finding elements within is ...


6

Most people tend to think that certain aspects of technology die away, but I always get the feeling that it is far more common for it to "sediment". Whenever I see a new trend, it usually never ends like "this is the new best way". Normally it is more like "we solved this problem with one global solution, but now it seems there are different solutions for ...


4

Folder structure is not dying However, its importance and prevalence in the average user's interface is. The truth is that a user will find the path of least resistance to accomplish their desired task. With this in mind, maintaining folder structure would have to become their desired task. For the average Joe, nope! The average person has become ...


4

Search helps if you know what you are looking for (obvious). If you don't know what you are looking for, a folder structure can help you find it. For example, if you are looking for a recipe for chicken Florentine, search will help you find it, or if you have chicken and want a recipe that uses it, search may help there too. But if you just want to cook ...


3

Ideally you could provide me exactly what I need without any input. This is, of course, impossible to do with various types of users all wanting different things. The reality is some businesses just have a lot of content that needs to be accessed at different times by different people so here are some things to keep in mind as you redesign your portal ...


3

I think non-linear navigation is very common, but maybe is a terminology matter (English isn't my native language). Anyways, just for reference, take a look at the image below from Oracle Alta Documentation showing non-linear navigation. Additional info, including link to nav bar application can be found here However, based on your picture, I think you ...


3

Yes, from end user point of view, back/home/forward means the browser navigation functionality. In an full page App, we should avoid those navigation naming that are confusing for user. You could suggest something like Previous | Reset | Next as the options. These will work as their name and will look like the buttons that client asked for. convince them ...


2

Maybe more true thing to say would be that concept of folder structure as file organizing strategy is dying. Or maybe more true: organizing files/documents is becoming more and more automated. If we have concept of categories and one file can be in two categories then I would really dislike doing manual organization. Therefore all these new technologies use ...


2

The two alternatives you've mentioned: Summary pages Windows-style drop downs An alternative that I've come up with is almost a combination of those two. Instead of an icon-based dashboard, I've come up with a windowed dashboard: Each window could list the various sites as links or buttons, with hierarchical links displayed as nested items: The ...


2

Yik Yak's recent update, known as "My Herd" (formerly basecamp), was implemented using hierarchical tabs. As you can see in the header, users can differentiate between "New" and "Hot", then "Nearby" and "My Herd" below. Although this is an iOS example, I believe it captures the functionality you are looking for.


2

Tree view is often complicated and counter-intuitive to the users, but it has several strong advantages: full names which are unique identifiers I mean, if I access a file named /etc/passwd I know I access a particular file. There is no way I get /home/backup/passwd instead. Tags don't give you this garantee: if you have found exactly one object tagged ...


1

They aren't dying, just finally revealing their limitations. In the age of limited processing power and os capabilities, folders were the easiest way to structure data. But not the best, as there's just one dimension to it - that is space. Tagging and taxonomies (word searching being just another one of those) came and added any number of dimensions, to ...


1

I think your question is why you don't see left-hand navigation by default any more. I'd say this mainly a trend--perhaps a good one. There are many trends these days and two of them are a) hamburger menus and b) single column page layouts. This article isn't in-depth, but one of many you can find out there that talk a bit more about this: ...


1

I was confronted with this challenge recently as well. There is a desire to have a "cool" portal page with lots of vaguely relevant icons leading to specific functional areas of the app. The trouble is, the whole thing feels forced. And if your app suite (or set of views and activities) gets very deep, the portal has a tendency to be either too shallow or ...


1

1. Visual orientation Users generally process screens top to bottom, as the following eye-tracking heatmap illustrates: Since the nav bar typically indicates the orientation of the page within the site (or app), it makes sense to place the navbar at the top since that is the visual entry point for the page. 2. Interaction frequency Typically, the user ...


1

I did a small User Testing with your icons. Chose 5 tech-savvy almost college aged kids who stay nearby and showed them the icons with the labels hidden. This is what they had to say This is the distribution for each icon Music-3 Songs-2 Movies-1 Videos-4 Search-all 5 More-all 5 But, the TV icon was ambiguous TV-3? Screen-1? Track pad-1? ...



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