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4

TL;DR Main menu leads the user, while breadcrumbs are following him. They relate like a GPS navigator and a GPS tracker. Main navigation supports and helps to form user's mental model of what is on the site. It has constant structure and is presented on the same place, with the same information. It's very reliable and consistent mean for navigational tasks. ...


4

Even if you set your site up so that breadcrumb links are "history" rather than "hierarchy", you should make them normal links. Doing anything else violates the user expectation that, after clicking a link, the "back" button will "un-click" the link. Your proposed system makes it so that they need to click the forward button instead.


4

You should not do this. Users know about the back button. "The Back button is the lifeline of the Web user and the second-most used navigation feature (after following hypertext links)". Jakob Nielsen in 1999. Or a Firefox study in 2010: "Across Windows, Mac and Linux 93.1 percent of users clicked the button at least once over the course of a five-day ...


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My answer could be a litle of topic, but I want to share my thougts to this anyway. The first question is, what does the user want. Does she want to book a car od buy a bus ticket or does she want to get from location A to location B an choose the better service. To choose the better service she would have to know the time it takes an the costs for each ...


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There cannot be a clear cut answer until one can see the entire flow of the application , where is the user coming from where does the user go etc from the mentioned screen. One Button Pros - No confusion , user knows what to do. Where to tap to go forward. Cons - Another screen , trust me more and more screens can frustrate the user. Popup screen to ...


2

Like with most questions like this, the tl;dr is: It depends. The correct navigational pattern is largely contingent upon three things: App structure (IA) Leaf page functionality (IxD) Desire to enforce prioritization by the product team (Organizational) App structure If your app is structured such that you can support fewer than 5 first-tier leaf ...


1

Depending on a couple of factors: Assuming the user lands on a study case only from within your website, you can omit the title in the "Previous" and eliminate the repetitive entities in the next, e.g "Next: Brand 2" instead of "Next: [CASE STUDY BRAND 2]" Assuming that you go social and there is a case that the user lands on the study case from other ...


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If I may suggest a slight change of direction: The layout you provide in the question (I'll call it the "read screen") is tied to a top-level report category - "Local Catalog Maintenance" in this case. If no top-level category is has been selected by the user, you'd want to show a different view entirely. Typically this would be a "index screen" of some ...


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Even though this is an older post, the core issue remains. ChrisF makes a valid point--core functionality of the Web browser shouldn't be disabled unless absolutely necessary. Also, adding text instructions may often be overlooked/ignored by users. A good possible solution is to incorporate some JavaScript that will alert the user if they attempt to use ...


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Given the picture you provided, I would expect the large date text ("Sun, 25 Oct 2015") as well as any changes in the Date Picker and Filter By to return to the values they were when the page was loaded. I would, however, not expect the table sort toggles to be reset. This is because of your use of white space and proximity as well as font style, the "reset ...


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There are several reasons to not add a tooltip that says 'Click...': It adds no reason for the user to take an action. It provides no context. They can click anywhere on the screen at any time. Why should the be interested in clicking that particular link? What is special about it? It's non-standard approach for prompting a user to take an action on a ...


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I think there is a clue in the name, Call To Action. In your example, the call to action for a page about an online community would be "Join our team" or "Sign up" or "Join our community" -- so the rule would be that there should be a verb and a reference back to the content of the headline and/or page. There's an excellent article by Paul Boag with 10 ...


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I would choose the 2 buttons approach, for these reasons. 1) The "Book" label gives the impression that you are booking a private ride service, more often associated with a personal car ride. It will be slightly inappropriate to say that you are booking a bus service assuming you will be sharing the bus ride other commuters. 2) As one of your team member ...


1

How about having two separate tabs, one for booking a car, another for buying a bus ticket. Both tabs would be laid out as similarly as possible. The button at the end would then say "BOOK CAR" or "BUY TICKET" as appropriate. That way, the user knows which option they have chosen, but the UI is the same. Consider what Google Maps does when you ask for ...


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Considering your flow, I think a single button is the way to go. What happens afterwards is the key. You should be displaying the available options for both scenarios instantly. The sorting of the options can be adjusted based on the more common use cases. Moreover, as a next step, you could create flows and UIs to suggest bus riders to try the car ...


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Based on the UI attached, I'm assuming that you are toying with the idea of progressive disclosure; meaning some form of user activation to reveal the items that are available. There are circumstances whereby progressive disclosure would fit slightly better, such as form filling, check out process etc. In this case (a menu), a progressive approach would ...



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