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6

I'm not sure if it's an exact answer to your question, but: yes, there exist some research on that users are more likely to discover more content, especially when the users are engaged in "time-killing" activities, according to NNGroup (who base their content on user research): Continuous scrolling is advantageous for content that streams constantly and ...


3

General answer is Back button shouldn't discard previously entered data. Holding the data avoids data entry duplication, if they returns back to this step. Data entry is quite painful activity for users. Invalid data should be holded too (it provides recognition), still the system should verify critical data before switching to the next step.


3

This seems like the kind of thing you should test with a card sort. Get as many potential users, company employees, stakeholders of the site as you can to provide input on the titles of these menu items. (This lets the stakeholders get their say in, but also gives you some research to point to if it becomes necessary to contradict them) Alternatively you ...


1

I don't have the research but in my own experience (also opinion) it gives the user a reference and easier recognition of the nav or tertiary content to main content. Even more important I believe on the side of UX; a visual hierarchy and focus to the main by giving a darker, to less dark nav and tertiary controls, to light main areas gives the user a ...


1

Good question! While I don't have any knowledge about relevant research, I think that having a button stuck to the bottom screen is not the best option. Here is my rationale: Button takes valuable space that could instead be taken by product information. Product information is critical for users to make purchasing decisions. It could be annoying to have ...


1

It really depends on a whole lot of factors...the least of which is the complexity of the state you need to preserve. It sounds like in addition to state, you need to store user-entered data. This is not a simple task. So, I'd begin with considering if opening a new tab is TRULY a burden for the users. Tabs are ubiquitous--even on mobile devices. If your ...


1

You'll want to prototype a few solutions (even if just paper), validate with real users and validate the technical solution with an engineer. The information will likely uncover discussions about validation routines, connectivity, client/server trips and compromises about forced constraints and technical feasibility. Be careful not to over-engineer a ...


1

Pretty easy. Put all your content into a single page so that initially the user can just scroll up and down the page to access everything. Now you break down the page into multiple sections by wrapping each section in a DIV. Finally, you hide all but one of these DIVs using CSS display:none, then you use the visible DIV to control the visibility of other ...


1

Just to extend Mervin's answer. Via navigation - sometimes Bear in mind that users don't always reach a page via the navigation - sometimes they get there from a search engine or a link from another website. If such is the case the in-page heading serves as a bolder, more obvious cue of "where am I?" than the navigation items. (There is a bit of catch 22 ...


1

There are a couple of reasons why the navigation is being repeated in the examples you gave Taking the first example,while the navigation does help inform the user, the large heading helps establish the context for the page as he scans the content and the user will not be forced to look at the navigation to figure out where he is. Taking the second ...


1

Through hierarchy and natural reading habits, we always read things from the top, which is generally where a website's title and menus are. With respect to your question, menu buttons are still at the top, even for many mobile apps, regardless of convenience, but strictly due to hierarchy. Home, settings, etc, you always look for at the top. This is not ...


1

Could you use an initial prompt when you choose to create the document, and split that dialog in two sections - those that are available in this location and those that aren't? But still give them feedback / info about how they can create the documents they want. Something like this perhaps? download bmml source – Wireframes created with ...


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A user should be able to create a document anywhere in your system. Declaring its type is totally fine, as is it auto-filing the document. Assuming that to be true, after the user picks the type and saves the document, show a temporary notification in the UI acknowledging the system saved the document with a link to where it filed location. Another thing ...



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