Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

2

The term Sign In can be used for both actions. It's also a good term if you're providing additional Sign In options like Facebook, Twitter or OpenId, as "Sign in using Facebook" doesn't imply the burden of a (possibly lenghty) registration process.


2

The more you can lose design elements that doesn't provide value to the reader, the better. Vertical and horizontal lines, fat headers with disturbing colours or boxes without meaning. If you can work with negative space (a.k.a White Space) for clarity you make your news site easy on the eye and less stressful to brows through where content stand out ...


2

The first issue is, which x does what? You have two "x" icons which may do the same thing, but perhaps not. If they do the same thing - why do you have two? If they don't do the same thing - you're using the same icon to do two different things! My concern is that a user may hit the "X" when they intended to hit the arrow, accidentally clearing their ...


1

If they are touching a different area I suspect you can use the same gesture for both. As to the question of if this will confuse the users, I would say it depends on how its set up. Carousels are often interacted with in the left / right manner because they re-enforce with graphics the mental model of having to go left / right in a stack of images. Going ...


1

The fact that you want to use a "tutorial" to explain the gestures, which could provoke a "wrong" behaviour, if made on the carousel, seems to me to be a design smell. I agree, lots of users know the "swipe-to-get-back" gesture, but I think you should still provide a back link. Have a look the the iOs mail app. They provide the gesture and a button too. The ...


1

The solution will be to look at how desktop apps do undo processes. Desktop software does undo and redo very well in many cases. Say I open a Word document, or a photoshop file, and I make some edits. At any given point I can use the undo or redo functions to move backwards and forwards through a sequence of snapshot states taken by the application as I ...


1

Without knowing what kind of a news site you are developing and without understanding what kind of an audience you want to draw/keep and making assumptions for the same, I would cautiously suggest a combination: - With Example 2, you are able to let the content be the star by taking away any visually distracting elements of the page. - With Example 3, you ...


1

Sometimes you can't backup things with data, because noone had this special problem or those people are not here... So if this should be true, I suggest making a design bet out of it and run an A/B-Test, seeing if there are problems when you have it on top nav or not. Possible measurments might be support tickets regarding this issue, task completions or ...


1

My main concern with your approach is scalability. How many pages of search results will there be? Consider how scroll bars work, and see if your solution will scale as well as they do. To use an example, let's assume we're using Microsoft Word on a desktop computer without a touchscreen. When scrolling through a long document, you have a lot of ...


1

This will be confusing for most users, the arrow is commonly used to go back 1 page or go forward 1 page, i think it is indeed better to say something like +10 or -10 if you really want a user to be able to jump 10 pages. However as discussed in the following thread it's most likely not needed for users to be able to jump a certain amount of pages. ...


1

In your example, you could have buttons for page 1 and page 25. Perhaps add ellipsis in between to emphasize the gap. Here's a close example:


1

You should use a "more" button to provide additional menu options. You should also really look at your navigation structure and figure out why you need so many options! 8-10 seems overly excessive. Apple: The iOS Human Interface Guidelines call out a minimum button size of 44x44 pixels, which equates to roughly 7mm. Pushing a left/right button onto the ...


1

I don't think it is possible to give a 'correct' answer, as such thing depends on many variables. For example, do users enter the site in explorer mode, or in task-completion mode? Anyhow, analytics data such as Average Time on Page (ATOP)can give some guidance for this ratio - the larger the ATOP is, the larger should be the content area. The existence ...


1

It depends on your type of application/website you are delivering; Structuring the Navigation with content is very important process in IA. You have to categorize the goal as primary and secondary to display the navigation+content. If you can achieve your goal through displaying 70% content area then why not to use that theme. I would say there is no ...


1

In this case, convention is on your side. Users inherently expect that they will find navigation on the left or top of a site. By employing contrasting background colors and other emphasis techniques, you can keep your navigation satisfyingly small and users will still have little to no problem finding it. You can look at this very page for an example. The ...


1

I think you should allow your breadcrumbs to show only the hierarchical view of your site , not how you reached there, which is summarized in the browser's history (at least if you made your site bookmarkable). As usability consultant Jakob Nielsen says here: Offering users a Hansel-and-Gretel-style history trail is basically useless, because it simply ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible