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General answer is Back button shouldn't discard previously entered data. Holding the data avoids data entry duplication, if they returns back to this step. Data entry is quite painful activity for users. Invalid data should be holded too (it provides recognition), still the system should verify critical data before switching to the next step.


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Ask yourself the following: Is the content on the web page supposed to be disclosed and hidden from unauthorized users? Do you want to restrict social sharing from those users you’re e-mailing? Is it a bad thing that users you haven’t e-mailed also get hold of the information through trusted friends? Do users in general trust an obviously unsafe password ...


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This seems like the kind of thing you should test with a card sort. Get as many potential users, company employees, stakeholders of the site as you can to provide input on the titles of these menu items. (This lets the stakeholders get their say in, but also gives you some research to point to if it becomes necessary to contradict them) Alternatively you ...


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Interesting question. I think you can have a look at the paper "Letter case and text legibility in normal and low vision". In the abstract you can read: Using a single unaltered font and all upper-, all lower-, and mixed-case text, we assessed size thresholds for words and random strings, and reading speeds for text with normal and visually impaired ...


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I recommend that you reserve the hamburger icon only for the main navigation menu. Whether you agree on its viability or not, it's been adopted in many designs (and propagated by the likes of Bootstrap) that a common pattern can be derived that (1) it is used primarily for the main menu and (2) it is used once.


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Only since the larger iPhone was introduced does this seem to now cause an issue. I think they were originally aiming for a consistent approach with desktop Safari, i.e. top left. All that being said, I think the advent of larger screens means these controls have to shift and change. I use the 'swipe back' gesture almost exclusively now. It's simple, fast, ...


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I'm not sure if you can control that the site is opened in a webview under other apps (I don't think so). There is no way to deal with it, some apps open the sites in-app, some others do it in the browser (safari). You can't do anything about it. Maybe the best way to deal with it is basically avoid fixed headers in mobile webs, so you will have only one ...


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Let me see if I understand You have two tabs where users do their work. +-------+ +-------+ | TAB 1 | | TAB 2 | +-------+ +-------+ And now you need users to navigate between the pages? How about a main nav section? It's done all the time. :-) +----------------------------------+ | Main Nav | ...


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I'd agree with the answer in the other thread you linked; two would be confusing so the "best practice" is probably "don't do it". Users who are less accustomed to the hamburger menu might not know what it is even if there's only one, and having multiple of the same icons would be even more confusing since it'd be the same icon that does different things. ...


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It's seems as though a conventional method is through tabs that you can "break out". It's the same behavior that occurs when you drag a Google Chrome tab out of the window - a new window appears that you can position wherever. I've seen the same behavior in enterprise software. The viewing pane has detachable tabs allowing you to create/modify views on ...


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It's platform dependent according to Nielsen Norman Group. Summary: Should the OK button come before or after the Cancel button? Following platform conventions is more important than suboptimizing an individual dialog box. That said, It's correct on Apple devices, but not OK on Android/Windows Phone devices.


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I recommend that 'Cancel' should be removed and retain the "Back to..." link. Currently, initiating either the "Cancel" and "Back To..." actions invoke the same abandonment of the use case of making updates to this user profile. The only difference is that the "Back To.." link is more explicit in where the user will be taken compared to the "Cancel" button. ...


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The answer to this is going to heavily depend on the transition between the list and the details view. For example, if the details view slides in (not a hard refresh), then it makes more sense for the buttons to be "Save" and "<- Back", indicating that it moves you back to the list view. If the details view appears above the list view, then "Save" and ...


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I don't have the research but in my own experience (also opinion) it gives the user a reference and easier recognition of the nav or tertiary content to main content. Even more important I believe on the side of UX; a visual hierarchy and focus to the main by giving a darker, to less dark nav and tertiary controls, to light main areas gives the user a ...


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It really depends on a whole lot of factors...the least of which is the complexity of the state you need to preserve. It sounds like in addition to state, you need to store user-entered data. This is not a simple task. So, I'd begin with considering if opening a new tab is TRULY a burden for the users. Tabs are ubiquitous--even on mobile devices. If your ...


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You'll want to prototype a few solutions (even if just paper), validate with real users and validate the technical solution with an engineer. The information will likely uncover discussions about validation routines, connectivity, client/server trips and compromises about forced constraints and technical feasibility. Be careful not to over-engineer a ...


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Pretty easy. Put all your content into a single page so that initially the user can just scroll up and down the page to access everything. Now you break down the page into multiple sections by wrapping each section in a DIV. Finally, you hide all but one of these DIVs using CSS display:none, then you use the visible DIV to control the visibility of other ...



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