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14

BURGER VS GRID - same or different context? I think the burger and the grid generally have different meanings, though they're not formalized anywhere yet (at least, it's not widely known like ISO or W3 standards). The burger menu usually is more about navigating content within a context. You're on a website and navigate to different subsections of the ...


13

Edit People should read this article about the hamburger menu. I rest my case: the hamburger menu does NOT work. Big companies like Facebook and NBC have found it to be true and they've changed from burger navicon to a TAB BAR, a tab bar with icons + words seems to give the best conversion rates. My example of Facebook was not nonsense, they did change ...


6

Notwithstanding the familiarization aspect from almost every other website, linking to the about page has a couple of serious issues. Firstly, if you link it to the about page, then you still need a link to the important home page. So now you need another prominent home logo or home menu item. This would add clutter, complexity and potentially confuse. ...


4

The images themselves tell you what format the menu will have. In these cases, grid layout that is common amongst web applications today, in the case of the three lines, that's usually a menu with a list style of some sort. I think 4 dots is definitely overkill, you can get the point across with 3. It has little to do with the content and more to do with ...


3

Both the options are good but Tree navigation is recommended. My suggestion would be add the search box above the tree navigation to access the menu item quickly. User can type 3 letter in the search box to get the respective page link.


3

That's a clear "NO", as it lowers the discoverability of the system you're trying to make. Design-wise it may look sexy to really minimize it untill nothing's left, but to me it just adds to the confusion. It also seems pointless to add another step which just "gets in the way of doing my job". But hey, don't take my word for it: ...


3

You should not do this for a couple of reasons: first, as has been said before, users are used to clicking on the logo to go to the home page. This phenomenon called baby duck symptom means that users stick to things that they already know. Changing where the logo links would also be a violation of the "Consistency and Standards" Heuristic. (Users should not ...


3

I think this particular icon is known as the "App Drawer Icon" If I am not wrong, the trend started with the app drawer icon acting as the launcher for apps on Android and Blackberry, particularly on Nexus and Samsung mobile phones (in early days) Since then, it has been adopted as a launcher icon for a list of apps. Edit (based on my comments and other ...


2

I think its more like 'trained behaviour', repeat a pattern enough until it is accepted, kinda like the hamburger icon. (although it provides lower discoverability, it has its place it the world. Another way of looking at it, is that the landing page is in part the about page: looking at the home page should definitly give you clues of the information ...


2

Smashing magazine published a nice article about AB testing best practices and a link to calculator of audience you need to ensure your results are statistically significant. Check these links: http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2010/06/the-ultimate-guide-to-a-b-testing/ https://vwo.com/ab-split-test-significance-calculator/


2

It's better to be consistent in the Master-Detail pattern and display the detailed info on selecting the item in the master panel. You can use Add to Compare and Compare Campaigns features for the item. It will be obvious for users.


2

Let me first set out a few things that make it easier to respond to your question. Hover. The purpose of a link's or command's hover response is to signal or enhance its affordance, or perhaps to indicate its pliancy—its willingness or receptiveness to action such as the dropping of a dragged object. The pointer on a computer screen is a proxy for our ...


2

Do you have to show the number of steps for a single step process? Surely you only need the user to recognise a multi-step process when it IS a multi-step process - ie when there are 2 or more steps. My recommendation would be to abandon the single step indication all together.


2

I believe you should go back to the previous page/step and go with the second option, where the user is notified the purchase has been cancelled and give him the option to go back and try again (they might have chosen to click back to correct something, so they'd expect the operation to be cancelled/paused). but take these things in consideration: During ...


2

While there are quite a few similarities between the Start menu used in Windows and a hamburger menu, I'd say there are a few key differences in their execution. Amount of Content One of the biggest arguments against hamburger menus is the amount of navigation friction they introduce. Usually these menus contain a small number of buttons or functions that ...


2

I would avoid it...for now Because... The grid icon is as uncommunicative as the hamburger icon. The hamburger vaguely communicates a menu list, just as the grid vaguely communicates a matrix of icons. In terms of communciative design both are problematic because they presume the user knows the UI layout of the underlying menu and can relate that ...


1

Representing the entire site schema in one page is a bit like search, as mentioned above, or an old-style site map page. Is this meant to be a guide to the site, or working sitewide navigation? If it's the latter, you could display the top levels (0-4) in the mega-nav and the lower levels in section nav. If the sections are really deep, you might want a ...


1

From the 2. the tree navigation option seems the better choice. I'd add accordion behaviour(expand/collapse) to the navigation so unused elements of the menu will be hidden. Also, having breadcrumbs will give the user a sense of where they are on the application. You could also have selectable elements in the breadcumbs to allow the user to jump between ...


1

Consider yourself lucky to get such a challenge! I had a stint of time when I was designing mainframe applications - it was quite a shock to have to go from graphics to text-based interfaces, but it forces you as a designer to really focus on the core aspects of design. A few things I've found useful in CLIs: Easy way to access help for commands, ...


1

Going by the limited information we have, I assume that we are talking about something along the lines of a "planned transaction" form, where there are three actions: Primary Action 1: Authorize will actually cause the transaction to happen Primary Action 2: Reject will prevent the transaction from happening Secondary Action: Cancel will NOT have an ...


1

I agree with the points stated by @JonBee, but I think the main difference lies in the options (content) we are showing to the users, and the purpose of an App or a PC. Usually, we give our mobile users content to consume as soon as they get into our app, so they don't have to wonder what to do... they just start consuming what's on the screen -plus, they ...


1

One of the critical piece that made the Start button work was a sustained, ubiquitous, multi-million dollar ad campaign. It would be hard to understate the effect of this on users' ability to understand the Start button.


1

Hover states afford click-ability and hence it's suggested that the hover color should be noticeable. In general, a contrast to the background color will help you achieve this desired effect. You can see an example on this site itself: The hover color is in accordance with the triad scheme for the base color. There are some more technical guidelines ...


1

The multi-select list is always uncomfortable to use - it doesn't naturally show that it is capable of multiple selection. I would stick to single selection when clicking on the campaign names and add a checkbox to the right of each item in the list. At the top of the column of checkboxes I would add the title "Compare". This means that the user can click ...


1

Have you thought about simply providing a separate 'compare mode'? Checkboxes seem like a way to really identify which ones you want to compare. If I wear my 'user' glasses, I'd probably want to read something about the campaign before I decide to compare it with another one; in webshops I'm used to see some sort of "compare" button, which allows me to ...


1

You have raised a good point but linking logos to "Home" page is more like a convention now. For a better user experience it would be advisable to link it to the home page because you don't want your user's to think hard while using your website. The flow of the actions should be smooth.


1

Simply make the bar 100% height. If you have 12 icons you can just-about-get-away-with-though-I-shouldn't-recommend-it making them expand to fill the available screen space. 1/12th of a 4 inch screen (75% of current users have 4+ inch, and that includes somewhat older phones) gives you 7.33²mm squares. Windows Phone recommends to use 7²mm squares but ...


1

The vertical icons idea is fine, but you need to take care of an indicator showing that there are more icons hidden below the fold. Here are some possible solutions: Use semi transparent gradient on the bottom of icons list Position the icons so that last one is cropped in the viewport When user opens the app, auto scroll the icons list from the bottom to ...


1

It depends on the colors used in the rest of your website, the mood you're trying to achieve, the content you're presenting, etc. Contrast In general you should aim to have a lot of contrast between the navbar and the rest of the page, so that users can find it easier. This is what Stack Exchange does, the blue navbar contrasts heavily with the ...


1

The challenge here is that you are using a limited-view carousel for a full-on product catalog view. These are two somewhat contradictory things. If it were just a carousel, I think what you have is fine. But it looks like it's set up for users to filter, sort, and jump around. In those situations, seeing only 3 items at once isn't all that useful to a ...



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