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63

Before and during the development of Windows 95, Microsoft was being sued by Apple for allegedly having improperly copied the Mac OS GUI. From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple_Computer,_Inc._v._Microsoft_Corp. Apple lost all claims in the Microsoft suit except for the ruling that the trash can icon and folder icons from Hewlett-Packard's NewWave ...


41

What's best calling these things depends on who is using the system; and what is the nature of the action really being performed; and what other actions may be performed. The Programmers View With relation to databases (and data-driven APIs) there's the famous CRUD operations, which stands for Create/Read/Update/Destroy. In many programming languages you ...


38

A few of my guesses: Numbers are harder to anthropomorphize - we've reached a point with our understanding of computers where we regularly refer to the computer as another being we regularly interact with. It's much easier to give this creature some kind of name vs. a number, especially given that numbers are often used to "dehumanize" things and make them ...


32

Much of what Microsoft initiated with Windows 95, including the Start Menu, served primarily to differentiate it from Mac OS, which in the popular mindset was the only OS competing with Windows. This coupled with the rise in attention to ecological needs in the 1990s made the term "Recycle Bin" an apt way to accomplish this differentiation, without serving ...


24

In theory the correct answer is no upper limit for name lengths. Allow the user to enter whatever their name is using whatever characters are available to them so that you will never run into a circumstance where someone is prevented from entering their valid real name. In practice that is not possible to implement. There have to be limitations. These ...


18

First, .co is a TLD intended for websites hosted in Colombia. Second, users are habituated to .com. The missing m is perturbing, and many people will forget about the fact that instead of accessing a company website, they must go to a website with a Colombia-type name. This being said, some well known companies, including Google or Twitter, reserved .co ...


16

Good question... I don't think you ever will be able to get it right, so it's better leave this responsibility to the user. You can trim spaces, of course, but you shouldn't mess with the case. The only foolproof formatting you could do, is to make everything uppercase. This might be handy for internal use, but not as a correction of the user's entry. ...


16

"Leave game" sounds way better than Unjoin. Also, you could give your users the choice to leave the next game or all the games using a drop down button like the one in the screen capture.


16

If you take a tomato back out of a real-life recycle bin, it also doesn't get recycled. Nor does it get disinfected (unless you actively do that). However, if you leave it in there and the bin gets emptied, both eventually get recycled. The tomato the traditional way, the file because its bits on your hard disk get made available again for storing other ...


15

These are some UX factors: (human factors as well as marketing reasons) Names are more "human friendly" than numbers. ("Windows Vista" feels friendlier than "Windows 3.0") Names can be conveyed in more intuitive way than numbers (I just got Ice-cream Sandwich on my phone) Names/Things can be something people feel passionate about. ("I like Lion" feels ...


15

The trivial, most general answer is that sorting by last name makes sense when users are matching based on last names and sorting by first name makes sense when users are matching based on first names. Of course, this gets you absolutely nowhere because the hard part is figuring out which is likely to be the case! It's not possible to do this ...


15

You should always use the word which is common among the users, no matter if it is the technically correct one or not. In Why the electronic land registry failed, Lauesen gave a very vivid example of this. This is a story of a large system which had to be made mandatory for use in real estate purchases in the whole of Denmark. The requirements were ...


14

In terms of navigation and hierarchy, Open Card Sorting should do the job. Open Card Sorting: Participants are given cards showing site content with no pre-established groupings. They are asked to sort cards into groups that they feel are appropriate and then describe each group. Open card sorting is useful as input to information structures in new or ...


12

A quite common pattern for showing all of something is to extend the category with a filter, which in your case would be something like: http://mydomain.com/factories/all That way you can use the filter in your URL to select factories in let's say Europe: http://mydomain.com/factories/europe And moving down the list to a single factory, such as: ...


11

I am not sure when Windows introduced that word, but if it was since Windows 95, as Bart Gijssens's answer claims, then Microsoft is not the first one to come up with the idea of recycling. NeXT STEP operating system introduced at around 1988 had a recycling mark as the icon for its counterpart. Microsoft may have gotten the idea from there. Your question ...


9

My first thought is that most people will abandon the secondary naming scheme you assign each colour, and will probably call each state by its colour. The first real-world example of this behaviour that comes to mind is the American Department of Homeland Security's (discontinued) colour-coded threat level warning system. You will note that, even in the ...


8

To the absolute majority of users, they're all the same. Users aren't going to go "Ok, I'm looking for Preferences, and this here thing says Settings, so it must not be what I need". Most of the problems with unclear terms arise from exactly this type of backstage dilemmas - the techie developers say that Preferences isn't exactly the right term, because in ...


8

Jacob Nielsen recommends straightforward naming conventions over "clever" ones. Don't use clever phrases and marketing lingo that make people work too hard to figure out what you're saying. For example, the "Dream, Plan, & Go" category on Travelocity might sound catchy to a marketing person, but it's not as straightforward as "Vacation Planning." ...


8

In Windows, the recycle bin was introduced in Windows 95. (source used) Of course, Microsoft took their idea from other OS'es that had it long before. On most OS'es, dragging a file to the trashcan meant: Delete the file. This is where the word "recycle" comes in. Microsoft was looking for a way to make clear that moving items to the trash does not delete ...


7

I think it mimics iOS UI style (at least I don't remember such a component before iOS, please correct me if you have some other information): source It is UITableView with style Grouped. Or you can call it "text field group".


7

By default, a majority of applications use this format, especially when dealing with a high number of contacts such as within Salesforce. This is mainly due to how broad a first name can be compared to a last name. Searching for a contact by a last name, you're likely to have fewer results thus easily finding that specific contact. For example, say you ...


6

Simply put - folks from non-English-speaking countries may not know what in their full name is the first name and the last name, trust me. This is probably due to the complexity of their names. So your best bet is to ask for their "Full Name" which would be a lot clear and straight forward to most. And if you have to ask for their first name and last name ...


6

What's your app about? There is probably some natural term from the domain. For example, if it was a forum that might be "member". For this site we might call ourselves UXers, designers (oh, hell, I've opened a huge can of worms there!). The other thing to think about is roles instead of users. For example, I have an application which has a workflow in ...


6

My best answer is that it's easier to market, especially since it exacerbates the difference between different versions. It only really works for products where the newer version is always better/improved over the previous version, and generally only where the product stands alone/doesn't have substantially different variations (e.g. Windows XP, which had ...


6

The whole use of a user ID predates email, and the term has stuck with developers. If your email is your userID, you should ask for email instead. There are many cases where a user has a userID as well as an email address, and in those cases the login should allow you to use either of the two. I did some testing with a system where users had an email ...


6

They could be referred to as Grouped Form Fields. It is partly a design trend. I think most people would argue that while it may be visually pleasing, it is not great from a usability standpoint. You could closely group fields without needing to combine them in that way. For example, someone may not realize that they need to tap again to type in a second ...


5

Think of user as the base user type and everyone assigned to this type is called just user. Admin actually inherits from the user type and gets i.e. more rights and this is why you may call him admin. So if a user is just a user and not a specialization of user type it makes no sense to call him somehow different. Ok, this might be from the view of a ...


5

Because you're asking about a desktop application, the answer is straightforward: follow the conventions of the OS so users will be familiar with the terms your app is using. On Windows, this means "Options". On Mac or Linux, this means "Preferences". Notes/Caveats: If your app runs on multiple platforms, try to use the apporpriate name for each ...


5

Given the diversity of names, I wouldn't... set a floor or ceiling limit on name length, OR even break the name into two separate fields. Depending on the country / cultural background of a person, they may have a more Westernized [first-name] [surname] name, but they may not. Why possibly bar users from entering their complete name because of arbitrary ...


5

Hash is very standard, and the term is certainly recognised in the public domain due to social media terminology. If users were still confused I would subsequently offer 'Pound' then 'Sharp' in that order.



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