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Here's my current solution: I chose to use pushpin icons instead of checkboxes. I use @Mart's suggestion to repeat the selected items at the top. I also like the suggestion to move the selected items to the top right away, but have not implemented this. The buttons with selection actions are visible only when at least one item is selected. I have set the ...


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What about displaying the next page of results below the first page? Show the first 10 results, then have a "show next 10" button at the bottom. It loads the next "page" of results below the existing set. The context remains the same so you can maintain the selected rows. I've never seen this pattern before but I can imagine it working well.


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I would repeat the selected items with their checked box on the top of the table when the user navigates to another page. This has the benefit of keeping them visible and allow the user to uncheck one of them any time. The drawback is when the user wants to select a lot of items, there isn't much more room for the paginated items. How to handle this ...


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Just to understand the problem better. Curriculum 1 > level 1 > subject 1 > $xx and Curriculum 1 > level 1 > subject 2 > $yy are the types of price variations that you are providing. So from your proposed suggestion screen 3 shows the total amount for all the possible combinations (of curriculum - level - subject) from the selections made (since you have ...


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I think what you have isn't bad, however I would make a few small tweaks. I would look at introducing headings to help the user. Maybe seeing it in the context of the website would help, but to me, I find it difficult to tell what each field relates to. You could also include a progress/stepped approach here by adding a number or icon to say '1. Choose ...


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My only feedback would be the fact that it's displaying all the content at once. It looks like quite a lot to take in at the start. There could be some indication of 'steps', showing three different screens, only revealing the next piece of information after the last has been selected. This makes sense given that the next field requires the previous to be ...


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Your entire scenario is quite similar to the "shopping cart" paradigm. I think ux-discovery applies here. Users should be able to discover functionality and information by visually exploring the interface, they should not be forced to recall information from memory. When buying items on Amazon, my shopping cart is always visible, and I can hover ...


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This is one of my favorite Photoshop features that I am amazed isn't more prevalent. (It's used in the layers panel to show/hide layers). I never realized it was called checkbox strafing though (awesome name!). It's one of those odd things that initially feels like it will be clumsy and unusable but in reality feels extremely natural and efficient. It's ...


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A "drag to select" paradigm in a list box is not common. I have never seen this used, although apparently it does exist in Photoshop. A more common quick selection paradigm is clicking on one item, then holding down shift and clicking another item, which selects all items in between. Users are not going to expect this drag to select behavior, and ...


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Is it possible (or likely) that a user could select both Level 1 & 2? If not, it might be an option to organize the data hierarchically based on the level offered (eg. Level I courses, Level II courses etc) with sports listed under each one Although this might lead to more repetition, the competency levels would be much more clearly delineated.


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The giant spreadsheet you've laid out is nobody's friend. There's nothing wrong with page navigation when it's sensible. And I understand that clicking 'next' through 30 activities doesn't qualify as sensible. But there are other options. Is this just a survey of what the user is interested in, and what they might like to see you offer? Or are there ...


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When looking at a large set of data and realizing that the organization is not working, you want to look at how the information as a whole can be presented differently - not just swapping out a single control for another. That's my short answer to your specific question. You do have a lot of checkboxes and they are confusing. Start by looking at a different ...


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What if you used dropdowns for each activity? That way it doesn't matter that different activities have different amounts of levels to choose from. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


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You could set a dropdown that will show conditionally based on if users select Level 3. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Note on Progressive Disclosure Progressive disclosure minimises cognitive load. Source: http://arb.nzcer.org.nz/strategies/progressive.php The use of progressive disclosure allows the ...



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