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An interesting point is that these days, it is really trivial to scroll a 2000 items list. In ancient times, say, 4 years ago, when dealing with exactly the issue you raise, I would create some sort of system - a search, nested list, alphabetical buttons or whatever. But today, it's totally trivial to scroll over a couple thousand items. And note that it ...


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Since you are dealing with expert users, I would consider a multiple-selection autocompleting input field: An alternative that uses a bit more space, but much less than hundreds of checkboxes, in order to show the options would be a double list box. This is more user friendly in the sense that you do not have to be an expert in order to look through the ...


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If you are trying to minimise multiple selections (e.g. not have a user select 25+ check boxes) but want to retain the option to it might be worth grouping available tasks. From looking through there seem to be similar functions throughout so you can group them to the subject e.g.: Agents.Brand_Management Favicons: Upload Show Delete Apply Logo: ...


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Smashing Magazine describes a nice solution based on the results of usability tests. It handles typos, various spelling sequences, synonyms and prioritized options. The technically correct term for this would be something like an “auto-complete text field with loose partial matching, synonyms and weighted results.” Here's the demo.


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1: If we're talking a global system then that's a no. As you say it could be a real pain to zoom right in to Singapore, lots of clicks. Also don't forget that though it may seem logical to me and you that the USA is that big bit, second one down, on the western land mass, some people REALLY suck at geography. A lot would depend on exactly what sort of ...


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Since it is a tablet device, can't you automatically detect the location? Either from the user profile, or from the location service of the device? You could bring that up as a default selection an a longer list.


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Definitely a dropdown list with the autocomplete (you press C, list scrolls to Czech Republic). One list for a region, the other one below that reacts to first one, for the country. If there is no user need on the region list, ditch it altogether. Country list is essential here. You don't want a rich UI for something as simple and tedious as a country ...


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How about just using a Combo Box? download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups By a user being required to just choose what country they are from, it removes the unnecessary step of a user needing to first select the region (or you can just infer the region based on the country selected if needed). Allowing a user to start ...


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If you want to use one of these methods then use the second one as this method has less critical disadvantages. Add a search bar at the top of the screen to filter records. That way user won't have to scroll all the way down.


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The multi-select list is always uncomfortable to use - it doesn't naturally show that it is capable of multiple selection. I would stick to single selection when clicking on the campaign names and add a checkbox to the right of each item in the list. At the top of the column of checkboxes I would add the title "Compare". This means that the user can click ...


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It's better to be consistent in the Master-Detail pattern and display the detailed info on selecting the item in the master panel. You can use Add to Compare and Compare Campaigns features for the item. It will be obvious for users.


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Have you thought about simply providing a separate 'compare mode'? Checkboxes seem like a way to really identify which ones you want to compare. If I wear my 'user' glasses, I'd probably want to read something about the campaign before I decide to compare it with another one; in webshops I'm used to see some sort of "compare" button, which allows me to ...


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A map pin denotes a location, it doesn't give you info about what that location is in order for the user to make the decision that "Yes, I'm interested in this location". So something like this may make sense download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups When user clicks/taps on the pin, display a popover with details about ...


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I'd also recommend maybe check out how Chosen handle multi-select dropdowns. I think their solution is elegant especially because it allows you to easily remove one of the selection without having to open the dropdown again. In your solution you have to open the dropdown to un-tick something. Also, I think having checkboxes inside a select is sorta hectic ...


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They're perhaps most universally referred to as tags. You may be interested in the UI-Patterns page on them. However there's a wide variety of names for tags. I discovered the following by looking at the code from the websites: mentions (facebook) tags (stack exchange) tokens (pinterest)


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I think you've answered your own question, several times! They're called tags, or labels. That's both the UX term and the term for the look. UX-wise this name was chosen because functionally, they're little labels that can easily be hooked onto certain items/objects, and they illustrate values that relate to said object. The same goes for the look: they ...


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I would consider moving from a dropdown box to a grid with all subjects. Seems like it'd save a fair few clicks.


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What's wrong with using a dropdown menu? Anyway, I would use colors and an icon to indicate what the current budget is, in the place of where currently the blue text says "budget". With the default being set to just "budget", and offering up alternatives like savings account, government grants, sales income. Example: Functionally it'd work like a radio ...



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