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19

One alternative that I've seen in a number of places is to have two adjacent lists, one with available items and one with selected items. Here's an example from OpenFaces.org that I found with a quick google search:


18

In short: No, average users don't understand that. You could either just show all options with checkboxes or try something fancy like a dropdown with checkboxes (example, see features dropdown). This would have to be tested though. Hope that helps, Phil


15

Another solution is the facebook like "multi select bar". (I don't know what the exact name for it is.) You can find an example here. Basically it is like a text input field but the selected items turn into "tags". Just try it out on the page I have linked to.


15

In the original GUI guidelines from the Lisa/Macintosh, Xerox Star, and Microsoft Windows, check boxes are, as the name implies, something you can mark (with a check-mark) if you wish to select or mark it - or clear if you wish to deselect it. Each checkbox choice is independent of each other, in terms of their activation. Radio buttons, on the other hand, ...


14

While there are a few different ways to do what your asking; I prefer the "free tag" input method (not sure if there is a better name for this component). Basically users are allowed to enter in terms/tags/values into an makeshift input. Suggested/autocompleted terms terms/tags appear to the user as they type. As terms are completed/selected they appear in ...


14

Yes, there is a convention: checkboxes = option for multiple choices radio-buttons = only one single choice among the options


13

When looking at a large set of data and realizing that the organization is not working, you want to look at how the information as a whole can be presented differently - not just swapping out a single control for another. That's my short answer to your specific question. You do have a lot of checkboxes and they are confusing. Start by looking at a different ...


12

I am as surprised as you that users have difficulties to add a folder with this standard dialog window. But users are surprising, that is why we like them I don't think there is a perfect solution but maybe what you need is a combination of complementary solutions First you should keep this "folder selection" system because it is the more standard for ...


11

Could you combine all 3 in a singe field with the label "Phone Number, Email or Name". Other than that I can only suggest using text to describe what the user should do - "Please fill in ONE of the following:" for example. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


11

As long as it truly is within a single year, a range slider seems appropriate here. via Kevin Anderson on Dribbble EDIT: The date range picker on the google finance site solves the problem with my previous answer. This example doesn't "snap" to month increments, but a different implementation certainly could.


11

If you are asking for data that usually follows a particular format, then ask for it in that format. Visually people are used to months shown in a calendar, so show it in a calendar, and let them select the months that they want. Visually it is very easy for someone to see whether they have the months that they want like that. Here is a quick example of ...


11

If a range of months could span across the year end, perhaps a circular dial makes more sense. Since you have limited vertical space it would have to be a dropdown though. Something like this perhaps:


11

I have nothing but anecdotal evidence, but I know exactly what the issue is. Average people don't know where their files are. I'm going to broadly group everyone into two categories. Power users These people understand where there files are, can think through nested folders and easily browse what they want from the dialog you've presented. Their ...


10

I would have a fist checkbox called something more descriptive like "All permissions" or "Admin". I would then make the other checkboxes visible (or active) based on whether that checkbox was selected. This should be fairly easy to implement, and should be visually clear and fast to scan. Example mockup:


10

Go with check boxes for multi-select inputs. It is a norm in implementation since the first GUIs and it a standard practice in UX too. Nielsen's article confirming the use of check boxes: http://www.nngroup.com/articles/checkboxes-vs-radio-buttons/ Checkboxes are used when there are lists of options and the user may select any number of choices, ...


9

Here's an example on a live website: http://www.omegawatches.com/watchfinder (e.g. "features" dropdown) I'm not sure how well this works, we could never test it unfortunately.


9

In my personal view dropdowns are outdated and quite frankly rather annoying to interact with. They are fiddly when opening/closing, most often they don't provide much help when scanning items, when combined it is cumbersome to go back a level (e.g. you need to open the Main Heading dropdown again) and when holding many items, a lot of scrolling back and ...


9

Take a look at the bigger picture. What is the user going to do next? Probably not undo - possible but not probable? If the likely next step is to move another item from the left list to the right then you should leave focus on the next item in the source list, so that the user can move multiple items easily be sequential pressing of the arrow button. So to ...


9

Is the concern about implementation or UI clarity? I can't see why a "Select Full Row" option should be any harder to implement than the rest. A sugesstion might be to somehow highlight the last column a bit differently than the rest since it performs a function somewhat larger than the rest too. I'd almost be tempted to make that "Select Full Row" a ...


8

The Chosen javascript plugin may be exactly what you're after. It compiles all previous selections in a nice stack while letting you continue to make selections.


7

You have a few options, but it all depends on how many choices you are giving the user to select from and how much recall they have (have they seen these options previously? Are they familiar options? Are they new to the user?). Here are some options that you may want to consider: If you don’t have too many options to select from, then you may wish to ...


7

I have experimented with different solutions for a high traffic website, and the best approach was to use checkboxes and disable the rest of the options when the maximum is reached. Initially the users see regular check boxes. There is a message telling users that they may select up to 2 options, but most of the visitors do not read it. When the user ...


7

Firstly trees are not great tools for use on mobile because on mobile devices, touch targets need to be bigger and so a deeply nested tree takes up far too much navigation space compared to the content displayed. I would choose an approach which allows you to split up the navigation into a more stepped process. A greater number of simpler steps is easier to ...


7

download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups If you can have one and only one identification method, then let them select which they want to use via a group of 3 radio buttons and once they select one make the label and input for that identification method visible or have them disabled until selected via a radio button. The ...


7

Your "All" option needs to be first, not last. Otherwise a user who needs all airlines might go through the list and tick all of them before he gets to the end of the list and sees that he could've accomplished it with a single click. In terms of text, either "All airlines" or "Any airline" is good (assuming that it's the same in your app). Icon ...


6

On the major three mobile platforms' default browsers, it appears as though multiple select listboxes are supported just fine. They each implement the functionality similarly. What actually happens is you click the form element and a modal dialog is presented with a scrollable list of your options and a way to select them. On iOS there is a popup with ...


5

Depends on the ui and the space layout you have. Depends also on the number of items in your list and the average number of items user has to select. One interesting solution is a dropdown list + checkboxes http://dropdown-check-list.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/doc/dropdownchecklist.html The more items are present the less a dropdown will suit (having the ...


5

I think you answered your own question, right here: but this gets pretty wide pretty quickly if there is a deep tree. What you're looking for is a checkbox tree, no?


5

I think the interface looks fine. I think you are too loose in what you offer your users with the ability to tag. Everything isn't a tag. A lot of these options seem mutually exclusive. A song's era is basically in and around its release date -- songs created in the 1920's are always going to be 1920's songs and that's never going to change. A song has ...


5

If the dropdown is your choice, why not try a enhanced version that offers more flexibility? As an example, consider checking http://harvesthq.github.com/chosen You can see that the dropdown adds some styling (not a compelling feature) and adds a very useful searchbox inside. The benefit of this solution is to provide an alternative (quicker?) way to ...



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