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17

Compare reading patterns. They are based on Gestalt principle of proximity. It's better to slightly re-organize months, i.e. your second choice.


11

I do not think this is a secret design. Actually, this is a principle that may be inherited from newspapers or magazines: It would be impossible to read articles if they had not that three or four columns layout, just because your eyes would lose on which line you are reading and which is the next to read. This minimizes eyebal movements while reading. ...


6

If you have multiple columns on your form and you positioned the labels to the side, you would have to significantly space out the boxes on each column from the labels of the next column along. I'd recommend that top aligned labels would be just fine, as it keeps the labels clearly and efficiently attached to the column in which they belong. Multi-column ...


5

Both top-aligned and left-aligned labels have their pros and cons. If you are designing a three-column layout, you will have limited horizontal space, so more than the best option it is possibly the only option to fit in one column label and input in such a way they are big enough and don't get confusing: That said, I am not sure how convenient is a three-...


5

Hmmm take a look at this: https://github.com/filamentgroup/tablesaw As width is reduced, the table converts over into a listing. You do lose the ability to do row comparisons, but it does ensure data remains accessible for small screen sizes.


4

I assume you're speaking about which of your layouts is faster to perceive by the user. This depends on what you want to achieve with your layout. If you want to tell that there are 3 equally weighed points the users should know on the page, the second example is the way to go. If you want to say: "Here are some interesting things", page one gets the bonus....


4

You can put some kind of a high-level view, providing relevant statistics, etc regarding your managed devices. Usually it is called a dashboard: source BTW, it seems to be quite natural: if you provide a way to monitor a certain device, why shouldn't you provide a way to see the whole picture? It can be quite a valuable option.


4

Very long lines of text are hard to read, and people tend to make mistakes when finishing one line and wanting to move to the next line. Multi-column formats help deal with this problem, but multi-column layouts are not appropriate for every situation. Multi-column articles work well when you don't have to scroll to see the bottom of each column. Think of ...


3

It's always a good idea to keep the item that's in focus in the viewport. However, as soon as the user has taken control of the positioning of the screen (eg. by scrolling to the side) you need to be careful about repositioning (eg. scrolling back to put the focussed item within the viewport again). I would propose to only do this initially when a new/...


3

Its kind of hard to figure out what might the exact issue with the layout of the text without having to see it but here is what this article (Practical Tips for Utilizing Columns of Text in Your Layouts) says about using multiple columns in websites Many print and web designs you see today employ a simple, single column design for the main text ...


3

Here is my opinion about the layout and why it works. First, we as humans tend to read from left-to-right/right-to-left. We all know that. Long line lengths are bad for reading, but that doesn't necessarily apply to youtube, unless you enjoy reading the comments while listening to the video. Even if we take into account our reading direction, that doesn't ...


3

I don't suppose this is a question that will see definitive answers unless we wrangle designers for the sites you mention. In response to the three questions, I would venture "yes", "yes", "no", but I would also propose some other possible explanations not represented: We're talking about user experience, of course, but a designer is a sort of user. We ...


3

While there some usability concerns around line-lengths, I think there are two main reasons why this layout is so popular. Design control. Designers have much more control over how the website will look using the popular fixed-width, centered layout as page elements will not move around or change size at the mercy of the users browser window size. Ease of ...


3

Two columns of the same width visually indicate to the user that each column is equally important. Information displayed in either column would thus hold the same amount of value to the user. If you have made to columns of equal width but the information your are displaying in each is not equal in value then it can lead to user's feeling some sort of '...


3

The key problem here is that the desire to conserve horizontal space clashes with our perception of how the language is written. It's a relatively common pattern to collapse columns & panes into thin "toolbars" on the side of the screen, as seen in Outlook 2007: Thus, the most obvious solution for the problem with Kanban board would be to minimize ...


3

Here's a more condensed version of what you posted. I kept the read-only fields on a row separate from the inputs you can actually alter.


2

There's nothing wrong with it and it's actually a good idea - as long as you do it right. Meaning that you provide a clear visual clue that this column is different from the others, a clue like a different background color for the entire column - not just some icon on the header row. Also, it can only be enough if you just have one level of grouping, i.e. ...


2

I'm having a problem comparing your two versions. Your new version is wider than than the old version giving the illusion that there is more negative space, which I think the old version desperately needed anyways. However, just looking at the new version by itself, there is no sense of hierarchy of what's important on the page. Atleast with the older ...


2

The deeper you go in the hierarchy, you can start compressing the top level items. You are basically treating the columns as your breadcrumbs, they give you an idea of where you are and you can get the details by focusing (expanding) them. This helps you keep all the columns in focus and easy backing out. download bmml source – Wireframes ...


2

On the Mac OS, the Finder's Miller Columns uses a combination of scrolling and breadcrumbs to support navigation: The advantage to this approach is the scrolling allows the user to see all of the items at each level of the exposed hierarchy, while the breadcrumbs makes the hierarchy path to the current level explicit. In your use case, I believe a ...


2

1. Less is more Trying to fit more stuff on a single page isn't the goal of providing a good UX. Figure out what the primary task at hand is and only show that. If additional details are needed in rare cases then hide those until the user requests them by clicking a show advanced options toggle button. "Perfection is achieved not when there is nothing ...


2

I like hovering to show buttons to reduce clutter, but you should make some kind of 'Add' or plus sign button so that people on touch devices don't have to magically know to tap on the empty space. I initially thought the 'add column' buttons were regular columns and not buttons, to be honest. I think making them smaller and actually showing the columns ...


2

Here are some suggestions ... Retain your first grid suggestion - the existing one - but override the sort order for the Name column to sort people by their family name. Easy to achieve and easy to understand, but might be a little confusing for new users. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Provide a search/...


2

It is interesting to me that the problem with large multi-column tables is not being solved by creating better content and information architecture, because regardless of how responsive or accessible the table is the information is still going to be unusable to the reader if there is simply too much information. The question of how to fit a large amount of ...


2

You mentioned the cognitive load placed on the user with such an approach, and I think it would be wise to also consider how 'fragile' the user experience is in this case. For example: User selects airport 2, runway 2 - proceeds to enter 6 fields of complex data collected from around runway. As user attempts to Save this data with "Save" button, they ...


2

There's is a lot of research around that explains the way a reader's eyes naturally flow when reading, so you may find some of that useful. One of the things you're doing, based on your example image, is mixing your layout even within a page, and that can be quite disorienting for a reader. Also, I would argue that the right page is the way it should be ...


2

The first thing to get out of the way is: your reader will either be skimming and hopping through your document, or they will be actively fighting the urge to skim and hop. To successfully guide your audience through the page, you'll need to minimize these temptations, and make your intended approach more or less irresistible. Eyes can't be "Forced," and ...


1

Infinite scrolling is useful when displaying bite size information users can grasp at a glance and in cases where users won't re-visit a certain point to get some information they've seen. Among the examples you mentioned another great example is Mashable Here they have implemented infinite scrolling for all 3 panels. First decide whether infinite ...


1

Is the user required to enter every field for every question? If not, consider using progressive disclosure to make the initial cognitive load on the user a little lighter. For instance, if the initial state of your screen was just a list of questions and text-entry boxes for comments, it would make the task very clear to the user. As the user decides to ...


1

You're not saying what the use case is for this. Can you elaborate? Why would one need to specify values for all 12 months at the same time, and why would some need to be "estimated" and some "requested" instead? If you don't need all at the same time, have you thought about just making it one entry with a popup for the month name? Or if you need more than ...



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