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2

This effect is not very common really and it violates some pretty fundamental UX guidelines. The principle of least astonishment states that your interface should behave as the user expects it to based on their experiences and expectations, ie. you shouldn't hijack very common and established interaction paradigms unless you have very good reason to do so. ...


1

I would say three things: Price - mouse was relatively simple to put together, connect it to a computer and after that it was very easy to mass produce. It was, after all, mostly mechanical design. Ease of use and precision. First time users required very little tutoring, as the using it was very intuitive. Non-OS functionality offered high precision and ...


0

Something no-one else has mentioned is the fact that mice are cheap and simple. Money is always a major driver. The question is not "why is the mouse better", it's "why did the mouse beat its various competitors". Add "cheap and simple" to the functional merits already thoroughly examined and you have an unbeatable combination.


-1

I somehow do not like the learning that a user has to do before using the mouse. Understanding the movement and the impact on the screen. For me best pointing device would be my fingers. The movement comes naturally, and there is not learning curve for it. In 1968, computers were not as natural as they are today. I believe its high time, touch screen ...


2

Although most of the other answers probably have some degree of truth to them,I don't think anybody mentioned that it may have to do with the mapping of the movements of a mouse to the movements of the pointer arrow. With a mouse, you have span a whole 24 inches screen of space with just a small, 4x4 inches mousepad. This greatly saves effort on the part of ...


4

Because mice are subtle. It was the easiest transition in a world of keyboard-only computers. You can poke the occasional key with one hand while using the mouse with the other hand. You don't have to sit closer to the screen. The mouse just sits there innocently to the side of the keyboard. You can also be essentially asleep and operate a mouse. The ...


9

What is it about the mouse that makes it a good user experience? A mouse is very precise. It is controlled near a keyboard, which allows for quick switching from pointer control to typing, and it utilizes your wrist and arm allowing your fingers of your hand to be free for extra controls. A mouse gives the user options that other controls don't have. You ...


51

It was more scientific than one might think. At its inception the mouse was found to provide better speed-accuracy than light pens or joysticks. This is why the mouse was chosen for use in the original direct-manipulations user interfaces. The mouse’s superiority has since been replicated with other input devices, such as styli and trackballs, justifying ...


8

My use of a pointing tool is almost entirely for manipulating GUI objects while using a device for reading and writing, rather than for gaming or drawing. I have tried all the common pointing tools, and for me, as well as for several other people I know, none are as good as the mouse. My guess as to why is that one's arms and hands are extensively wired ...


9

Precision with minimum effort is one of the main reason why mouse is so successful. There are other reasons, of course. For instance, mouse become more influenced when personal computers were arising. It was the solution but why? At that time, personal computers were placed in office and business environments. They were on a table and there are plenty of ...


19

The light pen, if you think about it, is merely a stylus. And that has remained a popular method of input--just in slightly different form factors: light pen stylus on input tablets (such as wacom's products) stylus on pressure screens (Palm Pilots, Newtons, etc.) today's touch capacitance styli for most touch screens your finger So, I wouldn't say the ...


109

Positive aspects of the mouse user experience: The mouse position on the mouse pad is highly analogous to the position of the cursor on the screen. Two-dimensional movement of the mouse on its resting surface translates into two-dimensional movement of the cursor on the screen. The user can take hold of the mouse and can release the mouse without affecting ...


15

Everything is hard when you use it the first time. It's hard to use a bicycle if you haven't tried it before, hard to ski if it's the first time, as well as find the pedals gas, break and gear in any vehicle for the first time. Still, we use the pedals in the car, and the mouse as pointing device. Probably, and without any scientific proof, because this was ...



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