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576

This is the historical reason: (Concept drawing taken from document: VLSI-81-1_The_Optical_Mouse.pdf) The mouse, and therefore the mouse cursor, was invented by Douglas Engelbart, and was initially an arrow pointing up. When the XEROX PARC machine was built, the cursor changed into a tilted arrow. It was found that, given the low resolution of the ...


255

Take your right hand and point to your question. There, you see.


149

In addition to Bart's answer, I'd like to add one more reason. The reason the arrow was tilted to the left was so that the click position was easier to calculate, because the origin of the cursor's bitmap was in the upper left. This saved the mouse tracking subroutine a calculation on every click (its not much but it helped on older machines). Source


109

Positive aspects of the mouse user experience: The mouse position on the mouse pad is highly analogous to the position of the cursor on the screen. Two-dimensional movement of the mouse on its resting surface translates into two-dimensional movement of the cursor on the screen. The user can take hold of the mouse and can release the mouse without affecting ...


101

As pointed out in comments and other answers, pointer trails were originally "intended for" and "especially useful if you [were] using a liquid crystal display (LCD) screen" in Windows 3.1. LCD monitors at the time were mostly passive-matrix, whose typically slower response times meant your cursor didn't have time to get redrawn as it moved across the ...


86

hiding the scroll bar is a bad practice, for a few reasons: some people do not have a scroll wheel - just as you're worried. Just like how that impoverished county an hour away counts as "3rd world economy" by international standards, so too today do we find unusual relics of usability times 'long past' the scroll cursor is an indicator of position. It ...


84

Low level visual cognition In addition to the various answers given, there is also sense in a tilted mouse pointer if one considers the visual processes in our brain. Visual information arriving from our eyes is first processed in the primary visual cortex by the V1 area, then by the V2 area. These two areas recognise low-level visual features (hue, ...


63

The original purpose of the "mouse trails" feature, according to the Windows 3.1 documentation, was to make the mouse easier to track on the very-high-latency LCD panels used in early laptops, by ensuring that the pointer was drawn in each position for at least a full refresh cycle of the screen. It turns out that it also makes the mouse easier to ...


51

It was more scientific than one might think. At its inception the mouse was found to provide better speed-accuracy than light pens or joysticks. This is why the mouse was chosen for use in the original direct-manipulations user interfaces. The mouse’s superiority has since been replicated with other input devices, such as styli and trackballs, justifying ...


26

In case anyone wonders : some less known interfaces did use a straight arrow as pointed in Reddit


23

Overall, I believe hiding the scrollbar is bad practice. Even if everyone has a scroll-wheel on their mice, people are still prefer the scrollbar to go up and down a page. Also people might become intimidated by the lack of a scrollbar since the bar is an indication that there's more to see on the page than you currently see.


19

The light pen, if you think about it, is merely a stylus. And that has remained a popular method of input--just in slightly different form factors: light pen stylus on input tablets (such as wacom's products) stylus on pressure screens (Palm Pilots, Newtons, etc.) today's touch capacitance styli for most touch screens your finger So, I wouldn't say the ...


17

I've always thought that the arrow cursor is shaped similarly to your hand if you were point (naturally) at the screen with your (as typically dominant) right hand. I have no support of this other than my own subjective experience but it strikes me as a natural shape when trying to relate real world interaction into a low resolution computer screen where ...


15

Everything is hard when you use it the first time. It's hard to use a bicycle if you haven't tried it before, hard to ski if it's the first time, as well as find the pedals gas, break and gear in any vehicle for the first time. Still, we use the pedals in the car, and the mouse as pointing device. Probably, and without any scientific proof, because this was ...


14

Specific to your question title, unless you have absolute control over the platform, you should not make any assumptions about the hardware that your users may be employing. There are a myriad of input devices that already may be in play: touchpads/trackpads, trackballs, mice, touch screens, etc., let alone who knows what may become available in 3 months, ...


13

No. Not everyone has a mouse wheel. Some users don't even use a mouse. They use the trackpad and the keyboard. Now, your real question whether it is good UX to hide the scroll bar and show it only during scrolling: in my opinion.. No. Strictly speaking, users without a mouse and without a scroll bar can still scroll, e.g. using the space bar in the web ...


12

Also, there is another answer to this question. As a rule, the arrow mouse cursor must have one sharp tip (vertex) - because it is an arrow :) On the other hand, it is better for a mouse cursor to look good and slick. But drawing sharp tip on a rectangular pixel based display is very hard, especially without anti-aliasing. The 0 degrees (horizontal or ...


11

Its because Apple explicitly mentions in its Human Interface Guidelines that all software providers should provide all functions available with a single click and they dont see any use case for providing a right click. That said it does support an option to have a secondary click as shown below which brings up the contextual menu Now coming to the reason ...


10

In general - don't use hover to engage actions! Hover can be used to show subtle graphical cues like highlighting a button to show that it's possible to interact with it, or to show a tool tip. Users can get frustrated if actions are engaged just by hovering since it's not a standard way of doing it. And (as stated in the comments) - hover doesn't exists in ...


9

Precision with minimum effort is one of the main reason why mouse is so successful. There are other reasons, of course. For instance, mouse become more influenced when personal computers were arising. It was the solution but why? At that time, personal computers were placed in office and business environments. They were on a table and there are plenty of ...


9

What is it about the mouse that makes it a good user experience? A mouse is very precise. It is controlled near a keyboard, which allows for quick switching from pointer control to typing, and it utilizes your wrist and arm allowing your fingers of your hand to be free for extra controls. A mouse gives the user options that other controls don't have. You ...


8

This has already been said in the comments, but it really ought to be an answer: Do not hide the scroll bar, because most laptops do not have a scroll wheel. At best they have a rather substandard scroll area to one side of the mouse pad. I speak as someone who took an online exam which assumed the use of a mouse scroll wheel would be possible.


8

I've been in this situation many times. What I've always done is program the app to scroll the child-most element that the cursor is over and only that element: To clarify, when I say only that element, I mean that if you're scrolling an element in one direction and you reach the end of that scrollbar, I program it such that it does not proceed by ...


8

My use of a pointing tool is almost entirely for manipulating GUI objects while using a device for reading and writing, rather than for gaming or drawing. I have tried all the common pointing tools, and for me, as well as for several other people I know, none are as good as the mouse. My guess as to why is that one's arms and hands are extensively wired ...


7

A bad situation to be in, but it somtimes happens when maintaining old applications. There are a few things you could do to make things a little less confusing: Scroll the main window scrollbar by default, and only scroll inner controls if the user explicitly clicks on them. This would also require some visual feedback on which control is currently ...


5

I think all of the other answers have made it clear about not being able to assume everyone has a scroll wheel. To expand upon the other aspects of the question...yes, OSX has made hidden scroll bars the default behavior. But some things to keep in mind: people that use OSX will be used to this. So it may make sense if you are writing OSX software. It's ...


4

Fitts's Law is the thing you want to test. Fitts's law (often cited as Fitts' law) is a model of human movement primarily used in human–computer interaction and ergonomics that predicts that the time required to rapidly move to a target area is a function of the distance to the target and the size of the target. Fitts's law is used to model the act of ...


4

Not even every mouse, Apple's Mighty Mouse has no scrollbar, but you can use the whole area for scrolling. Hiding useless scrollbars when the content is smaller is okay and expected by most, but hiding active scrollbars was the worst decission ever and is only confusing the average user. Might make a little sense on tiny mobile phones, but even there it ...


4

Use hover, but don't make your UI depend on it as: it doesn't work on touch devices if used to reveal actions, those actions are effectively hidden away from the user hover is not accessible to all users (it requires patience; ability to exactly position the mouse) it's totally uncommon to activate items on hover, no matter how convenient that may seem ...


4

The mice that come with Macs today have effectively more than one button, a press on one side is considered the primary button and the other side the secondary button. The primary button is associated with selecting and dragging and activating (with double click), the secondary button usually pops up a context dependent menu. Earlier Macs had only one ...



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