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119

Positive aspects of the mouse user experience: The mouse position on the mouse pad is highly analogous to the position of the cursor on the screen. Two-dimensional movement of the mouse on its resting surface translates into two-dimensional movement of the cursor on the screen. The user can take hold of the mouse and can release the mouse without affecting ...


104

As pointed out in comments and other answers, pointer trails were originally "intended for" and "especially useful if you [were] using a liquid crystal display (LCD) screen" in Windows 3.1. LCD monitors at the time were mostly passive-matrix, whose typically slower response times meant your cursor didn't have time to get redrawn as it moved across the ...


64

The original purpose of the "mouse trails" feature, according to the Windows 3.1 documentation, was to make the mouse easier to track on the very-high-latency LCD panels used in early laptops, by ensuring that the pointer was drawn in each position for at least a full refresh cycle of the screen. It turns out that it also makes the mouse easier to ...


54

It was more scientific than one might think. At its inception the mouse was found to provide better speed-accuracy than light pens or joysticks. This is why the mouse was chosen for use in the original direct-manipulations user interfaces. The mouse’s superiority has since been replicated with other input devices, such as styli and trackballs, justifying ...


19

The light pen, if you think about it, is merely a stylus. And that has remained a popular method of input--just in slightly different form factors: light pen stylus on input tablets (such as wacom's products) stylus on pressure screens (Palm Pilots, Newtons, etc.) today's touch capacitance styli for most touch screens your finger So, I wouldn't say the ...


15

Everything is hard when you use it the first time. It's hard to use a bicycle if you haven't tried it before, hard to ski if it's the first time, as well as find the pedals gas, break and gear in any vehicle for the first time. Still, we use the pedals in the car, and the mouse as pointing device. Probably, and without any scientific proof, because this was ...


10

What is it about the mouse that makes it a good user experience? A mouse is very precise. It is controlled near a keyboard, which allows for quick switching from pointer control to typing, and it utilizes your wrist and arm allowing your fingers of your hand to be free for extra controls. A mouse gives the user options that other controls don't have. You ...


9

Precision with minimum effort is one of the main reason why mouse is so successful. There are other reasons, of course. For instance, mouse become more influenced when personal computers were arising. It was the solution but why? At that time, personal computers were placed in office and business environments. They were on a table and there are plenty of ...


8

My use of a pointing tool is almost entirely for manipulating GUI objects while using a device for reading and writing, rather than for gaming or drawing. I have tried all the common pointing tools, and for me, as well as for several other people I know, none are as good as the mouse. My guess as to why is that one's arms and hands are extensively wired ...


8

This question is quite broad for a single answer to cover everything, but I'll give it a go! First of all, motion sickness. In actual fact it's not even motion sickness, it's the opposite - it's the brain telling you you're moving when other senses tell you you're not. And in any case, it's not the manipulation of scene elements itself that is directly ...


6

No; it's uncommon and would lead users to thought that action has been already performed after mouseover, rather than indicate possibility of clicking. Also, note that volume control in vast majority of cases is under control of user and it's often the case it's just set to 0. I would suggest: Underlining, changing background, changing/emphasizing ...


4

Because mice are subtle. It was the easiest transition in a world of keyboard-only computers. You can poke the occasional key with one hand while using the mouse with the other hand. You don't have to sit closer to the screen. The mouse just sits there innocently to the side of the keyboard. You can also be essentially asleep and operate a mouse. The ...


4

Main problem with the sliders is that ordering is important: you cannot easily move €30 from Channel 2 to Channel 5. I see the following operations as relevant: increasing one channel's budget by decreasing the budget of one other channel increasing (decreasing) one channel's budget by proportionally taking (adding) bits from (to) other channels In ...


4

This original solution is attractive, but I agree with your assessment that it is not scalable. I would also argue that it is somewhat counter-intuitive because of its horizontal but proportional nature. For starters, I would change this interaction pattern to a set of linked fader controls. Something like what's found here for adjusting Bass & Treble: ...


3

Cognitive difficulty -> UI element looks like one area but actually has two different functions. Thus it behaves differently depending on where you click. Yes, there is a risk. However many UI's have a learning curve that balances discoverability, minimising real estate, efficiency, clarity. So with appropriate (a) affordances (b) learning curve (c) low ...


2

See this picture, a great example how Humble Bundle solves your problem: You see the three main sliders: Developers, Charity and Humble Tip. You can see, how they find a solution for the "Charity" slider, which is divided into two others sliders which can be changed without moving the other sliders - subsliders.


2

Firstly, if you are interested in mouse technology and how it works this article does a great job of it: An Overview of Mouse Technology To answer the first question, cpi (the correct term, but often confused with dpi) is pushed higher on mice for a number of reasons, but the tricky part is balancing out the different variables so that errors don't occur, ...


2

Because the people designing noisy keyboards are optimising for a different UX goal to you. Some keyboards are designed to be low noise. Using rubber domes under the keys to detect keypresses. Meanwhile other keyboards are designed to provide maximum feedback to the typist. These use a variety of mechanisms for feedback, including backpressure, activation ...


2

Great answers here! I'm developing a card game using Python and Pygame, which has no double-click support, so I stumbled upon the same problem. Inspired on Marcel Böttcher's answer, to measure your own time and then double it, I've created a small tool to measure the speed of double-clicks, and I'm sharing with you: import pygame import random ...


2

The reason to place the mouse next to the keyboard is to make it fast, easy, and accurate to switch between pointing (with the mouse) and keying (with keyboard), as is typically necessary for computer input. Not surprisingly, the further the mouse is from the keyboard, the longer it takes to reach for it. The difference in reaching time can be modeled ...


2

Although most of the other answers probably have some degree of truth to them,I don't think anybody mentioned that it may have to do with the mapping of the movements of a mouse to the movements of the pointer arrow. With a mouse, you have span a whole 24 inches screen of space with just a small, 4x4 inches mousepad. This greatly saves effort on the part of ...


2

Two suggestions: I would show the "Selected Group Title" and "Detailtext" as a tooltip/popover in the chart and change the background color of the selected group element (much more visible than indenting) This way you have all your information in one place (the chart) and don't need to look at different places fot the title, description, percentages, ... ...


2

This effect is not very common really and it violates some pretty fundamental UX guidelines. The principle of least astonishment states that your interface should behave as the user expects it to based on their experiences and expectations, ie. you shouldn't hijack very common and established interaction paradigms unless you have very good reason to do so. ...


1

I would say three things: Price - mouse was relatively simple to put together, connect it to a computer and after that it was very easy to mass produce. It was, after all, mostly mechanical design. Ease of use and precision. First time users required very little tutoring, as the using it was very intuitive. Non-OS functionality offered high precision and ...


1

Something no-one else has mentioned is the fact that mice are cheap and simple. Money is always a major driver. The question is not "why is the mouse better", it's "why did the mouse beat its various competitors". Add "cheap and simple" to the functional merits already thoroughly examined and you have an unbeatable combination.


1

Can't you remove the handles between the channels inside the slider and just use the signs above as handles? If it gets to tight, can you put every other below the channel? If all this fails and it's too messy - separate each channel into its own slider.


1

Here's an older article (2007) on Mouse vs. Direct-Touch for tabletop displays. Back in university I saw a number of papers that compared the speed and accuracy of different input methods in completing certain tasks. I suspect that there have been more modern papers that have revisited these experiments.


1

There are two studies suggesting you are correct. This one and this one. From the first study: " this raises the question of whether, for non-experimental purposes, there is any benefit beyond marketing for the 5700 dpi mouse we used." From the second study: "Though other reasons may prevail, the quest for mouse resolutions above 10000 CPI does not seem ...



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