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118

Positive aspects of the mouse user experience: The mouse position on the mouse pad is highly analogous to the position of the cursor on the screen. Two-dimensional movement of the mouse on its resting surface translates into two-dimensional movement of the cursor on the screen. The user can take hold of the mouse and can release the mouse without affecting ...


104

As pointed out in comments and other answers, pointer trails were originally "intended for" and "especially useful if you [were] using a liquid crystal display (LCD) screen" in Windows 3.1. LCD monitors at the time were mostly passive-matrix, whose typically slower response times meant your cursor didn't have time to get redrawn as it moved across the ...


87

hiding the scroll bar is a bad practice, for a few reasons: some people do not have a scroll wheel - just as you're worried. Just like how that impoverished county an hour away counts as "3rd world economy" by international standards, so too today do we find unusual relics of usability times 'long past' the scroll cursor is an indicator of position. It ...


64

The original purpose of the "mouse trails" feature, according to the Windows 3.1 documentation, was to make the mouse easier to track on the very-high-latency LCD panels used in early laptops, by ensuring that the pointer was drawn in each position for at least a full refresh cycle of the screen. It turns out that it also makes the mouse easier to ...


54

It was more scientific than one might think. At its inception the mouse was found to provide better speed-accuracy than light pens or joysticks. This is why the mouse was chosen for use in the original direct-manipulations user interfaces. The mouse’s superiority has since been replicated with other input devices, such as styli and trackballs, justifying ...


24

Overall, I believe hiding the scrollbar is bad practice. Even if everyone has a scroll-wheel on their mice, people are still prefer the scrollbar to go up and down a page. Also people might become intimidated by the lack of a scrollbar since the bar is an indication that there's more to see on the page than you currently see.


19

The light pen, if you think about it, is merely a stylus. And that has remained a popular method of input--just in slightly different form factors: light pen stylus on input tablets (such as wacom's products) stylus on pressure screens (Palm Pilots, Newtons, etc.) today's touch capacitance styli for most touch screens your finger So, I wouldn't say the ...


15

Everything is hard when you use it the first time. It's hard to use a bicycle if you haven't tried it before, hard to ski if it's the first time, as well as find the pedals gas, break and gear in any vehicle for the first time. Still, we use the pedals in the car, and the mouse as pointing device. Probably, and without any scientific proof, because this was ...


15

Specific to your question title, unless you have absolute control over the platform, you should not make any assumptions about the hardware that your users may be employing. There are a myriad of input devices that already may be in play: touchpads/trackpads, trackballs, mice, touch screens, etc., let alone who knows what may become available in 3 months, ...


13

No. Not everyone has a mouse wheel. Some users don't even use a mouse. They use the trackpad and the keyboard. Now, your real question whether it is good UX to hide the scroll bar and show it only during scrolling: in my opinion.. No. Strictly speaking, users without a mouse and without a scroll bar can still scroll, e.g. using the space bar in the web ...


10

Precision with minimum effort is one of the main reason why mouse is so successful. There are other reasons, of course. For instance, mouse become more influenced when personal computers were arising. It was the solution but why? At that time, personal computers were placed in office and business environments. They were on a table and there are plenty of ...


10

What is it about the mouse that makes it a good user experience? A mouse is very precise. It is controlled near a keyboard, which allows for quick switching from pointer control to typing, and it utilizes your wrist and arm allowing your fingers of your hand to be free for extra controls. A mouse gives the user options that other controls don't have. You ...


8

This has already been said in the comments, but it really ought to be an answer: Do not hide the scroll bar, because most laptops do not have a scroll wheel. At best they have a rather substandard scroll area to one side of the mouse pad. I speak as someone who took an online exam which assumed the use of a mouse scroll wheel would be possible.


8

I've been in this situation many times. What I've always done is program the app to scroll the child-most element that the cursor is over and only that element: To clarify, when I say only that element, I mean that if you're scrolling an element in one direction and you reach the end of that scrollbar, I program it such that it does not proceed by ...


8

My use of a pointing tool is almost entirely for manipulating GUI objects while using a device for reading and writing, rather than for gaming or drawing. I have tried all the common pointing tools, and for me, as well as for several other people I know, none are as good as the mouse. My guess as to why is that one's arms and hands are extensively wired ...


8

This question is quite broad for a single answer to cover everything, but I'll give it a go! First of all, motion sickness. In actual fact it's not even motion sickness, it's the opposite - it's the brain telling you you're moving when other senses tell you you're not. And in any case, it's not the manipulation of scene elements itself that is directly ...


7

A bad situation to be in, but it somtimes happens when maintaining old applications. There are a few things you could do to make things a little less confusing: Scroll the main window scrollbar by default, and only scroll inner controls if the user explicitly clicks on them. This would also require some visual feedback on which control is currently ...


6

No; it's uncommon and would lead users to thought that action has been already performed after mouseover, rather than indicate possibility of clicking. Also, note that volume control in vast majority of cases is under control of user and it's often the case it's just set to 0. I would suggest: Underlining, changing background, changing/emphasizing ...


5

I think all of the other answers have made it clear about not being able to assume everyone has a scroll wheel. To expand upon the other aspects of the question...yes, OSX has made hidden scroll bars the default behavior. But some things to keep in mind: people that use OSX will be used to this. So it may make sense if you are writing OSX software. It's ...


4

Main problem with the sliders is that ordering is important: you cannot easily move €30 from Channel 2 to Channel 5. I see the following operations as relevant: increasing one channel's budget by decreasing the budget of one other channel increasing (decreasing) one channel's budget by proportionally taking (adding) bits from (to) other channels In ...


4

This original solution is attractive, but I agree with your assessment that it is not scalable. I would also argue that it is somewhat counter-intuitive because of its horizontal but proportional nature. For starters, I would change this interaction pattern to a set of linked fader controls. Something like what's found here for adjusting Bass & Treble: ...


4

Not even every mouse, Apple's Mighty Mouse has no scrollbar, but you can use the whole area for scrolling. Hiding useless scrollbars when the content is smaller is okay and expected by most, but hiding active scrollbars was the worst decission ever and is only confusing the average user. Might make a little sense on tiny mobile phones, but even there it ...


4

Because mice are subtle. It was the easiest transition in a world of keyboard-only computers. You can poke the occasional key with one hand while using the mouse with the other hand. You don't have to sit closer to the screen. The mouse just sits there innocently to the side of the keyboard. You can also be essentially asleep and operate a mouse. The ...


3

Cognitive difficulty -> UI element looks like one area but actually has two different functions. Thus it behaves differently depending on where you click. Yes, there is a risk. However many UI's have a learning curve that balances discoverability, minimising real estate, efficiency, clarity. So with appropriate (a) affordances (b) learning curve (c) low ...


2

As Erics said: use Fitts Law. As for the experiment, the industry accepted standard is available in ISO 9241-9. It uses Fitts Law and throughput for calculation You can find one Java implementation here. If you're interested in reading a little bit more on why use the standard, I recommend this paper. If you wish to build your own experiment and completely ...


2

Because the people designing noisy keyboards are optimising for a different UX goal to you. Some keyboards are designed to be low noise. Using rubber domes under the keys to detect keypresses. Meanwhile other keyboards are designed to provide maximum feedback to the typist. These use a variety of mechanisms for feedback, including backpressure, activation ...


2

Great answers here! I'm developing a card game using Python and Pygame, which has no double-click support, so I stumbled upon the same problem. Inspired on Marcel Böttcher's answer, to measure your own time and then double it, I've created a small tool to measure the speed of double-clicks, and I'm sharing with you: import pygame import random ...


2

From Tog himself Not that any of the above True Facts will stop the religious wars. And, in fact, I find myself on the opposite side in at least one instance, namely editing. By using Command X, C, and V, the user can select with one hand and act with the other. Two-handed input. Two-handed input can result in solid productivity gains (Buxton 1986). It ...


2

Google recently experimented with just removing the scroll arrows in Chrome 32, and found that users were so upset with the change that they had to put them back in Chrome 34. Since the arrows are the one feature of the scrollbar that is completely duplicated by the wheel, it is clear that not all users have or want to use their scroll wheel. The most I've ...


2

Absolutely do not change the default behaviour in this regard. Why? Because this is one of those rare things where OS behaviour is too strictly and consistently defined to break it. As of yet I have not seen a single application breaking this behaviour (not counting crazy old half emulated applications which were never meant to be run on windows or are ...



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