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556

This is the historical reason: (Concept drawing taken from document: VLSI-81-1_The_Optical_Mouse.pdf) The mouse, and therefore the mouse cursor, was invented by Douglas Engelbart, and was initially an arrow pointing up. When the XEROX PARC machine was built, the cursor changed into a tilted arrow. It was found that, given the low resolution of the ...


223

Take your right hand and point to your question. There, you see.


142

In addition to Bart's answer, I'd like to add one more reason. The reason the arrow was tilted to the left was so that the click position was easier to calculate, because the origin of the cursor's bitmap was in the upper left. This saved the mouse tracking subroutine a calculation on every click (its not much but it helped on older machines). Source


82

hiding the scroll bar is a bad practice, for a few reasons: some people do not have a scroll wheel - just as you're worried. Just like how that impoverished county an hour away counts as "3rd world economy" by international standards, so too today do we find unusual relics of usability times 'long past' the scroll cursor is an indicator of position. It ...


74

Low level visual cognition In addition to the various answers given, there is also sense in a tilted mouse pointer if one considers the visual processes in our brain. Visual information arriving from our eyes is first processed in the primary visual cortex by the V1 area, then by the V2 area. These two areas recognise low-level visual features (hue, ...


48

I believe there is tendency to double click only when you use the default mouse pointer of type arrow. If it is a hand cursor or a zoom-in cursor users very well know it as a single click tool.


35

Double-clicking on the web should be avoided because it goes against the general practice of single-clicking links, and would likely be confusing. Jacob Nielsen says it best: ...double-click must die since it causes novice users great difficulties and since it conflicts with the single-click interaction style of the Web If your application does a good ...


33

There isn't any pattern common enough to be considered "normal" for this by most people, so it doesn't matter which you choose as long as it makes sense for your application. The important thing isn't whether it gets darker or lighter on hover. It is that there is some change. Someone using a site isn't going to say "that changed to dark on hover instead ...


25

Let say that you have the more common scenario of dark text and no other part of the design changes on hover and it's the background only, then when you hover, the button should be given a highlight. You're trying to focus on an item - to examine it and therefore it makes sense to brighten it up as if giving it more light to see by. Appearing backlit or ...


24

In case anyone wonders : some less known interfaces did use a straight arrow as pointed in Reddit


22

Overall, I believe hiding the scrollbar is bad practice. Even if everyone has a scroll-wheel on their mice, people are still prefer the scrollbar to go up and down a page. Also people might become intimidated by the lack of a scrollbar since the bar is an indication that there's more to see on the page than you currently see.


20

Conventions and the conscious breaking of The vast majority of people don't have their mouse buttons swapped. Even people who use the mouse with their left hand, often keep the buttons as they would normally be (myself is an example for this). Thus, people who swap these buttons can be considered in UX as complementary personas (people with special ...


18

Here's the patent for the blinking cursor patent: http://www.google.com/patents/US3531796 According to that, it was invented by Charles A. Kiesling at Sperry Rand. Patent filed Aug 24, 1967, granted Sep 29, 1970. This isn't iron clad proof that it was first invented at that time, but the time seems about right (computers were getting powerful enough that ...


18

Keyboard The Shift modifier is used for keyboard selection as well, and not just for single selection. No matter where you are, no matter how long the list, [Shift] + [END] selects everything from your current item focus to the end of the list, [Shift] + [PgDwn] one page (however that is defined). This also combines with the word jump of Ctrl where ...


16

Instead of double clicking to finish, you could: Click the starting point to close the shape (assuming all shapes are closed in) Have a button nearby labeled "Finished" or "Close Shape" or "I'm Done" etc. that closes the shape If you aren't able to use the OS to detect double clicks, I'd avoid them altogether. I've seen people with disabilities have the ...


15

I think it's more about maintaining conventions and user's general knowledge of those conventions than anything else. Browser/website interaction has been fundamentally different to OS user interface interaction since basically the dawn of the browser. In native UI's the convention has been to have a solid, non-clickable window area with UI elements akin to ...


14

The first time I saw this behavior was with Office 95. Word, to this day, still does this. In Word and Other applications like Notepad++, this cursor change indicates "a whole line" is the point of selection. Clicking while the cursor is in this state will select the entire line. Selecting an entire line is especially useful activity in text editors ...


14

Specific to your question title, unless you have absolute control over the platform, you should not make any assumptions about the hardware that your users may be employing. There are a myriad of input devices that already may be in play: touchpads/trackpads, trackballs, mice, touch screens, etc., let alone who knows what may become available in 3 months, ...


13

I don't see the need for any new studies in this area. The issue is that people usually take the results out of context. You can't comparing using a mouse to learning a keyboard command and then using it. Apples and oranges. Let me summarise what we know. If you don't know the keyboard command, it is usually faster to use the mouse as it has a lower ...


13

Not a complete answer, but some thoughts about why drag-and-select is not so good. Dragging with a pressed mouse button is physically hard to do. You have to keep a constant pressure on the mouse button, and if it becomes too light, your work is undone. Too much pressure and the mouse can't glide well, and the cheap ones feel like they will fall apart in ...


13

No. Not everyone has a mouse wheel. Some users don't even use a mouse. They use the trackpad and the keyboard. Now, your real question whether it is good UX to hide the scroll bar and show it only during scrolling: in my opinion.. No. Strictly speaking, users without a mouse and without a scroll bar can still scroll, e.g. using the space bar in the web ...


12

Simple answer, it was Charles A. Kiesling Sr. He was my father and he did indeed write the code for the blinking cursor when he worked at Sperry. He passed away yesterday in Minneapolis at the age of 83. I remember him telling me the reason behind the blinking courser and it was simple. It was not because it looked like an "I". He said there was nothing ...


12

I've always thought that the arrow cursor is shaped similarly to your hand if you were point (naturally) at the screen with your (as typically dominant) right hand. I have no support of this other than my own subjective experience but it strikes me as a natural shape when trying to relate real world interaction into a low resolution computer screen where ...


12

Also, there is another answer to this question. As a rule, the arrow mouse cursor must have one sharp tip (vertex) - because it is an arrow :) On the other hand, it is better for a mouse cursor to look good and slick. But drawing sharp tip on a rectangular pixel based display is very hard, especially without anti-aliasing. The 0 degrees (horizontal or ...


11

Option 1 by far. Please tell them that mouse distance is only one of many UX factors that need considered. Scan-ability - Knowing that the buttons are always at the bottom will cut out a lot of cognation and time for the user. Who says the users curser will start from the top? Think about where your curser is right now? is it near the top? or the middle ...


11

The issue is selection. On the desktop we usually select an item and then act on it. On the web, we act on the item without selecting it first - either that, or selection is implied by mouseover (which doesn't let us "select" multiple items). So, whenever we need to select an item explicitly before activating it, or when we need to perform multiple selection ...


11

I'll put in an answer myself here... (Hopefully this will inspire to submit more research links...) Searching the ACM digital library and a few other resources I found a few related articles. Categorization costs for hierarchical keyboard commands (2011) by Miller, Denkov and Omanson Summary Previous research comparing methods of issuing commands ...


10

1. Is the standard for both Windows and OSX. You should go with this. Update: (Note that when clicking at extreme bottom of screen it will automatically display as 4,when at extreme right it will display as 3, and at extreme bottom right it displays as 2.) This seems to make sense, you right click, and are at the top left position of the list of options. ...


10

What mouse acceleration essentially does is applies a sort of logarithmic scale to the distance moved per milisecond based on the speed you are moving at. The general concept is that when you are moving the mouse faster, you are trying to move it to a point further away, so acceleration scaled the distance the pointer will move to be even more than you ...


10

Windows default double-click time is 500 ms (half a second) Reference http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/bb760404(v=vs.85).aspx



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