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"Overlays and lightboxes are by design meant to convey a new page that’s laid on top of the of previous page. It should therefore come as no surprise that users perceive these as separate pages and expect the browser back button to bring them back to the original page. Alas, during testing, the vast majority of user-initiated overlays at the tested site did ...


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If you're prepared to put the work in to make it happen (it's not always an out-of-the-box control option), a combo-box is your friend here. The user can do any of the following: Type a whole new entry as if it was a text box Type a few characters and get an autocomplete dropdown for common/preset values Click the dropdown arrow & select from ...


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As long as the process is just a few seconds, I think you can handle it this way: User clicks "submit" to add a new tenant Show a loading modal with a message "Adding your tenant" (or something similar) with a little animation (as long as it is just a few seconds, you don't need to show the details of the process) After the tenant is added to the system, ...


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No, the modal is to notify the user of a successfully completed action. If the user is not completing the action again by going back, then they should not be shown the success modal.


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It should simply go back to the previous state (i.e page) and not repeat the previous action. Otherwise it would seem that your app/website has a bug, since this is not the expected behavior in most systems or web applications. Please refer to the workflow below for reference. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


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Well, "should" is a strong word. Right now, the predominant pattern is that the back button never does this. Based on this we can understand that any user is likely to be surprised by the behavior of re-showing a modal dialog when clicking Back. Whether this is a preferable behavior... it's surely a matter for a demographic study. One might expect that ...


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It has been noted via some research sources that email subscribers have less engagement post sign up but pop up can convert 10% more unique visitors. Here is an example: It converted 14.47% of the people who reached my blog. I believe that you will need to analyse your market first of all. Who are currently visiting your site? What are they doing? ...


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This is one of those times where you have to balance what the user wants against business objectives. Not showing the newsletter lightbox is better for UX (no real question about that), but it's worse at achieving the business objectives. What you have to weigh up is how important those business objectives are against whether you're willing to harm the UX ...



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