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1

Modal boxes are helpful for quick tasks or small notices where it is too cumbersome to load a new screen, and the user will want to return to the main screen after processing the modal. It's sometimes okay for modals to overflow a window (see pinterest for example). The form you are describing seems like the opposite of this situation: It has a lot of ...


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1. Is it OK to resize the dialog to accommodate changed content? Yes it is nowadays, providing it doesn't cause the window to scroll offscreen. There are lots of ways to do validation notices, but the approach you've chosen (notify below the field, red, left-aligned) is a very well tested and classic approach so it's a safe choice. The main downside to ...


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I think in this case disabling the minimise button is a good idea. "Run in background" does not minimise the window, it actually closes it, even if the operation keeps going in background. The window can be shown again by clicking somewhere bottom-right (if I remember correctly). The minimise button is not supposed to close a window, but just to minimise ...


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I find that you typically run into this scenario when the parent window that created the dialog window is waiting for information or workflow from the child window. Therefore, if the user minimizes the child window, and can't find it for whatever reason, the entire app is basically stuck. This prevents them from minimizing it, and keeps it in their ...


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Disabling the maximize button helps keep the UI looking consistant. If you look at your example picture, that is not a dialog that is meant to be maximized. Making a window lose the capability to expand is put into place to keep some windows is a good way to keep a smaller window small, without the user tampering with it.


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If you want to seal a deal don't block users from viewing content until they have reached "point of purchase" Amazon only asks users to login at checkout! Login walls require a significant interaction cost: users must remember their credentials (if they have an account) or take the time to create a new account. Therefore, sites should use them ...


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This is not a "feature", it's bad (or unfortunate) design, and there are two reasons for it, and one it technical: The height of either content in the modal or the content of the page is higher than the designer anticipated. The technical cost of setting a proper height of the modal was considered too high (and in unfortunate circumstances near ...


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From a UX perspective I can say that it can help users browse long sub-content pages while keeping the original position in the main page. For example sometimes there is the demand to have the main page as a one-page layout. This could be a very content rich / long page – but still you'll also have content rich / long sub-pages. Opening a sub-page in a ...


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Do you even need drop-down for only two choices? Instead of browse button you can have label "Templates" and then two buttons: Program From computer


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Depends on the next steps: The left one let's me change my decision again and again since it's always on top of what we are doint The right one is part of a (sort of) wizard with selected steps (in a way) I select where to find my template and go on the next step, and going back to change my decision will take a lot more effort


0

There is another standard pattern where items are moved into different 'folders' or 'tabs' with a notification, and that the user can simply action to move them between these different working areas. This means that because the user can 'undo' the action there is no need for a forced acknowledgement or confirmation. The classic example is to delete from an ...


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Severity and recoverability of the action can help guide the style you use. Also the platform you're on. Platform standards also playing a role. Dialog vs. Undo This was discussed in the following Q&A. When dialogs vs. undos make sense: Deletion: Confirm or Undo? Which is the better option and why? Slide to Delete Gestures on mobile devices ...


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Great question. I've been thinking a lot about "confirmless deletes" because of a behavioral issue with models that is outlined here. In short, most users actually intend to delete an item when they initiate the interaction, so throwing up a traditional confirmation is annoying most of the time. I totally agree with Lauren's answer on the basic ...


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Yes, I'd say you are correct. The standards are: let the user do what they want to do, but provide a way to undo let the user do what they want to do, but confirm before doing


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A lot of the challenge you're dealing with stems from the complexity of communicating and managing the relationship between the two windows (form and calculator). Ultimately, it looks like the calculator is there to assist with the form, so you may want to consider removing the "two windows" part of the problem altogether. Just have the calculator slide ...



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