New answers tagged

1

Not sure why you want users to explicitly 'save' if it's that critical. As dan1111 mentioned in previous answer, you may want to consider autosaving/revisit information flow for this task. That said, if you need explicit saving, option B is better than option A. Popping up two dialog boxes is confusing in most warning dialogue cases. It's advisable to ...


1

Correct your design rather than trying to solve this with an error message. Imported data most likely should be saved automatically, without requiring an additional user action. Even if you do need an explicit save action for some reason, you should save the program state so the data is not lost when they close the program--if they close without saving, ...


0

Apple calls this Slide Over in iOS 9, but I've also seen it called Page Slide. That second link is from Bill Scott (one of the authors of Designing Web Interfaces), and he gives a bit of a summary of the pros and cons: Usage To reveal additional navigation controls In TV or mobile space since controls and/or space is limited To expose a ...


0

This is called the Hamburger button or Hamburger Menu. I have also heard Navigation Drawer when it comes to android terminology. Most of the time, the pane is on the left side, but it's the same.


0

It seems to me that what you are describing is a custom text editor or am I wrong? If this is the case you should find plenty of examples (microsoft word, google docs, libre office, any e-mail program) where you can look at common patterns. Generally the controls to edit the text are at the top and users are very familiar with this pattern. Also, "toolbar" ...


1

A proposition from me is to use the #3 option starting the message with apology, then briefly explain why the action is unavailable and finally provide instructions on how to fix the error if possible. Sorry, the action is unavailable due to this. Go here and change this. Ideally the error message will be concise with red colored and should point to ...


0

The content in the overlay is urgent, and users are more likely to notice it in an overlay. I think it's important to have a prominent close button, to close it when click outside the model. Also, a cancel button at the bottom of the form in case they don't want to fill it.


0

Another way, depending on the message type, could be to replace "Don't show this message again" by "Don't stop on this <whatever> any more", which is in fact what the user wants. Then, the user could be notified (for example by stacking the messages in a notifications area) but the action wouldn't be halted but for a short while (like 700ms) in order to ...


32

If a popup confirmation is so uninformative that a user might need to move it out of the way to decide whether to proceed, then the problem is a bad popup, and allowing it to be moved is not solving the core problem. Assuming you really do need a popup that comes before the action and fills the screen, to get an informed response from the user before ...


1

since mobile screens are smaller, the screen realestate is more expensive and interaction is different, If you plan the screen properly, and test your app on many devices, you won't need to create a movable modal, the idea is to have all the relevant information for the current step that the user is in, on screen. if you plan on popping up messages, make ...


17

In terms of mobile, A mobile screen does not have the space to fix your problem by moving the popup. You can move the modal window and still not see the information you want to because it has limited space. A popup usually covers the information below by a black overlay so that it stands out. Just moving the popup won't be enough then. You will have to get ...


14

A tenet of good user experience in software is system feedback. In this instance, the system should confirm it will no longer show you notifications... which is a good place to offer an undo option, as well as tell them where they can change their preferences. For example:


1

If you use a modal dialog, you'll break the focus of the user. This is a good thing in some contexts, an excessive one in others. It takes time for users to switch their attention to the new, disruptive window, which is likely to partly cover the UI elements on which the user was focusing. It also makes it more costly to just cancel the edit, so to speak. ...



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