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3

In my experience, modal windows are best used to present clear interactions that the user either: needs to do (e.g. resolve an alert) has chosen to do (e.g. open a photo gallery). Resolving that interaction should close the modal, and there should already be a control in place that does that. This is because modal windows interrupt the user flow and ...


3

Take a look at this UX/Design guideline from Google about Confirming and Acknowledging: https://developer.android.com/design/patterns/confirming-acknowledging.html Although the guideline is for mobile applications, the principle and flowchart highlighted in the guideline can help you and your team decide when and when not to use alerts and confirm dialog.


2

I would not make search another tab because it creates disconnect between search and the categories search is for. Instead, I would put the search field above the tabs (a global search) so user understands that search is for all the categories. When user performance a search, you could display a search results tab to show the results.


2

Generally you should look at the use of confirmation dialogs as a last resort. They break the flow of the task for users that understand the system. The dialogs are often confused by users or not read at all. First decide if something significant will happen. If so, determine if undo function can be developed.


2

No never. Adding a second modal dialog over the first one is the equivalent of using pop-up window over pop-up window (and there's a good reason they where blocked in the browser and soon deprecated in web design). Instead try to guide your users through a modal dialog wizard with clear interface of what to expect next. User feel comfortable and trust the ...


2

In general, I use the following guidelines for using modals: Is it focused? Every time you throw a modal in front of a user, you're disrupting their workflow. Disruption isn't always bad. Sometimes that's what you want. But you have to realize you're doing that and use it for your benefit. Items within a modal should self-contained. A good rule of thumb is ...


2

Modal windows are quite common nowadays so the user might not but surprised to see something like that appear. The content of the modal window is more important than the pattern itself. If the content is an action, it is a common pattern to use ellipsis (aka suspension points). If the content is just information and long, you should just use a simple ...


2

I don't know about the general convention but I had the same problem and used the following solution. The link is displayed as a bootstrap button and I added the fullscreen glyphicon. Here is the result: First icon is edit and second icon is fullscreen, I hope the user will understand that by clicking on the link he will be able to edit the entity in ...


2

I think the problem is you are looking at the technological implementation instead of the user experience. The user generally doesn't care where they are saved, or how they are saved, only that they are saved. So instead of asking the user to deal with files, assume the user expects you to save them. It's then your choice of where to save them. Use a ...


2

Inline not Modal Inline edit is to be preferred at all times. The user keeps context, have the ability to use information related and narrow to the edit and the user don’t have to focus on a new UI. It is the same, simple, easy and straightforward process where the flow of work can be kept. Modal dialogue breaks the users’ context and it takes time for the ...


2

Arguments of the appropriateness of modal windows aside (because I don't think we have enough context for that from your question), I think your reasoning for why this is a good idea is sound. Some users rely very heavily on the back button: The Back button is the lifeline of the Web user and the second-most used navigation feature (after following ...


1

Within my specific constraints, I found a way to avoid the confusion. Some of the other answers suggest to use 'add' button in the list, or to pin it below the list . I cannot pin a fixed 'add' button at the end of my list because if the user scroll out of the list, another section has to be displayed below. So my only real option to show the button ...


1

Closing a modal window using the back button in the browser is none standard practice. Common practices include: clicking on the "X" on top right corner, clicking outside of the modal window, or hitting the "Esc" key on the keyboard. The problem of implementing a none standard practice is most people won't know it's there to use it. Clicking the "Back" ...


1

I'll answer this question in two parts. Are modal windows Accessible The answer to what I can find seems to be Generally no. I recommend looking at this study which was done to check how screen readers react to modal windows. To quote the study Being a screen-reader user I tested several modal dialogs, including the jQuery modal dialog, with several ...


1

Instead of a confirmation pop up after user has clicked the OK button, the better user experience would be adding a "Save changes to configuration file" check-box within the Settings window. User experience benefits include: 1. no annoying pop up after the OK action; 2. present all possible options when user is in Settings; 3. less clicks.


1

download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups I would probably do something along the lines of Option 3 or Option 4, with Option 4 most likely winning out.


1

Unfortunately there is no fixed standard to show that whether a link will leave the page or remain on it. However, some websites use a link which shows a dashed blue underline when it is hovered. This may help convince your users that the action will not leave the page. You could also provide the user with more information without taking up any screen ...


1

Having call to action whether it is a link or a button with "View more details" as label for example should do, modal windows are pretty ubiquitous these days, do you have any reason why you want to explicitly let the user know that clicking this will open a modal window? This could be perceived as an unnecessary warning. If your user want to see more ...


1

As per request, my comment as an answer. On windows it is common practice that when changing settings these are preserved from then on. Which means that the new settings should survive stopping and starting the application. And that in general means saving them to file or to a database. To be blunt: I would curse - and probably remove - any application ...


1

I think this is like how Microsoft Word behaves when it asks for "save changes to normal.dot template?" or something like that. That gives me a knowledge that Microsoft Word might not, and able to save my changes as default for future documents (even though they didn't make it clear at first time, what the heck was normal.dot?). I think the best way to ...



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