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The inclusion of lorem ipsum implies that a design is unfinished or unused. Also, depending on the project, lorem ipsum can easily become what I call "designer friendly data" - data that conforms to the design, rather than a design that was clearly purposeful in its presentation of realistic data. I've reviewed the portfolios of many recent college ...


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This is completely my personal opinion that the shift from Lorem Ipsum to a mock yet relatable data is a step towards betterment. Such data gives a direct link between what goes where and creates an impression on the reviewer which content fits with each other. It also helps you to showcase the most probable values of fields on UI. It is the strong ...


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Considerations Employers are more focused on your problem solving skills and creativity in achieving this rather than the content of your wireframes. But this is no blanket rule: Problems that require solutions in terms of information architecture and information design will deserve extra attention in this area as long as the copy or labels used ...


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Lorem Ipsum distract the clients from design mock-ups. It leads them to ask on why their site if filled with an unknown, foreign language. It has often created confusion between the designer, developer and the copywriter or content provider. It even gets pushed live sometimes without anyone noticing. Using Lorem Ipsum is a way half-heatedly go about the ...


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I think the use of lorem ipsum depends on the type of wireframes you work on. When I look at a UX designer's portfolio my main questions are "what sort of problems have they worked on?" and "what were the thought process in solving the problems?" I don't think that using lorem ipsum is bad in any way provided it's warranted. Wireframes change over time. As ...


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The point of Lorem Ipsum is to try and not distract the audience from other things (design, site structure, etc.) when content is not the main focus. If you want to demonstrate your copy writing abilities than definitely include it. If your writing is so bad that it'll distract from demonstrating your other capabilities (visual design, interaction design, ...


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It's better to include real copy. I say this because: It will give the people context for your design. It will help them understand why you chose to design the interface and interactions the way you did. The copy is an important part of the user experience. If you demonstrate that you are a skilled writer, that is a benefit to you. See this link for more ...


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Using real copy instead of placeholder text is another venue to display your creativity. Even if you are not a copywriter, it shows that you are capable of delivering more than just wireframes and comps. It also better describes the work you were doing, and leaves less guesswork for the person reviewing the work. There are times it is appropriate to use ...


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I try to avoid anything like passing 80 pages to a development team. There are lots of reasons for this. Cognitive theory shows it's very hard for anyone to absorb 80 chunks of information. Modern design practice is iterative or agile, and results in much better collaboration with developers and product derisking than waterfall style models where large ...


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I finish everything and only then pass it to the programmers. Usually the best is to use some kind of mock-up software (axure, invision, flinto, etc.) So they understand the entire usability. This is even more important in work with clients. Only after the client approves the design we pass it forward to the programmers, and then it comes back to design for ...


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I normally pack it respecting the tasks or sub-tasks, according to the priority order from the product owner/teamlead (more urgent first), so that when developers are going into the sprint, they have all they need for the feature they are about to start working on. Normally for me it's 2 to 5 screens per sprint per team, so if you are working with two ...


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Consider adding labels to the tabs and putting them at the bottom where they can be pressed with a single thumb tap.


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Like most things, there is no magic bullet solution. Leveraging standards, for better or worse, can guide you down an established direction. Your users are likely have seen and possibly gotten acquainted with the following: Android Design Guidelines, Google Multi-Screen Resources, Apple HIG and W3C Mobile Web Application Guidelines. Let established ...


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If you are looking to create high fidelity mock ups, I don't believe that there is a system where you can input your style guide, and have the system use that as a basis. Personally, I use illustrator with Flinto as well as Pixate to create my (interactive) mockups


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1) A grid system can be helpful for alignment and pleasant balance of content, but I'd also pay attention to the OS-specific Human Interface/Design Guidelines (Apple & Android) to determine element size, minimum spacing, common design patterns, and standard placement of typical system functions. Those may or may not cooperate with your chosen grid ...



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