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22

The best way to describe interaction is to model it with an interactive prototype. There are various prototyping tools such as Axure or the one we're developing, Handcraft. Whichever one you use, the point is that they allow you to show your client, peers, etc. what happens when you interact with elements in the mockup. You'll get much better results using ...


16

If you're building a web site or application, HTML mockups are far superior because you're designing the mockup in the format as close to the final product as possible. This allows you to set expectations much more easily, it constrains you to just what's possible in the final product, and it affords much greater flexibility. This convention is gradually ...


15

Yes. You'll like Balsamiq Markups. You can even make it a little bit interactive.


13

This answer applies to most presentations, not just UX ones. A good presentation is like a story, where you take your audience on the journey that you want them to experience. If you send the presentation to them ahead of time, you lose the ability to take them on that journey. There are other potential negatives as well in that your audience may start ...


12

Yes, they do. Low fidelity tends to get people to focus on the higher level aspects of the mockups, like the overall layout and concept. While with high fidelity mockups people tend to focus on the lower level details like "this should be two pixels to the left", or "this needs to be a different shade". That is one of the reasons that I recommend ...


9

It's a fidelity issue. The catch is that either document can be higher fidelity than the other depending on what you are focusing on. An HTML prototype is really the only way to truly mock up any interaction of even moderate complexity. There's simply no way to fully document interaction design within a PSD file. Conversely, if you're in an environment ...


9

I personally am a big fan of Axure for rapid medium fidelity prototyping and I really like the fact that you have so many widgets you can pull in to create decently high fidelity mockups Android Library for Axure prototyping However for creating high fidelity and production level mockups,my tool of choice is Photoshop Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich ...


9

Just a few days ago, I accidentally stumbled upon Usaura. You should definitely first go to Take a public test and run through at least 5 or 10 different tests to see what kinds of mockups and interactivity there is. I think this will be a good solution for you. Edit: I found an alternative solution, called Verify. I haven't tried it, but it seems to be ...


8

SketchFlow which is part of Expression Blend Studio by Microsoft is really, really good... There's also Sketchify Justproto App Sketcher PowerMockup JustinMind


8

Android Stencil kit Android Wireframe Template (printable PDF) A Collection of Printable Sketch Templates and Sketch Books for Wireframing


7

Unfortunately it's very common to show customers more than one solution - at least where I live (Switzerland). I never liked this approach though. My thoughts: There's always the risk that the customer choses the "wrong" version. And it's hard to argue against it because they'll say: Why would you show it to us if you don't agree with it? And they'd be ...


7

A/B testing is about optimisation. Mockups and user testing are about insight. User testing (even with a small sample set) will help give you insights into what potential problem areas may be so that you can find ways of improving them. This should be your goal, not trying to optimise a design. A/B testing, needs large sample sets to make any conclusion ...


6

Hey Mem, can't believe what I am reading here. Instead of rejecting everyone's tipps maybe it is a good idea, that you first clarify what do you understand if you say "usability features"? To your assumptions and questions: I'm new into this subject and, for what I've read, it seems that usability tests take place AFTER site development. They ...


5

One potential drawback of using HTML mockups are that the client could think that you've finished the application - even if you've told them what it is. Seriously, I've known people - both clients and managers - who on seeing a mockup using the tools you normally use to build the actual product think that you've done most of the work and are surprised when ...


5

I'd go for simple paper mocks. The best guide on the subject is Paper Prototyping by Carolyn Snyder Consider this: while it seems like a good idea to have recording of what the participants do, during the design process you probably aren't going to have time to analyze the videos in detail anyway. Much easier to use simple paper prototypes with one member ...


5

When an interactive mock-up isn't an option, try text. You can add numbers that point at parts of the static image or wireframe, and then provide interaction notes for each number.       Above: an example of a pointing number.


5

It seems like you have two issues: Verifying/understanding user requirements; and Convincing your team that testing is a good idea. Verifying/understanding user requirements When trying to understand or verify user requirements, I try to stay from using any type of mockup or prototype. In this stage, I try to understand the problem not attempt a ...


4

Depends on what you need to test. Most early stage usability testing is qualitative research, hence your insistence on quantitative data (metrics etc.) is moot. Metrics only make sense if your sample size is large enough, otherwise they are simply put: bullshit. Learn to use your ears and eyes, and you will discover most significant problems, anyway. And ...


4

There is no single screen resolution for Android tablets. Although many current Honeycomb-based 10" tablet screens have a resolution of 1280x800, your application can also run on smaller screens (say, 7") and different resolutions and aspect ratios. And don't forget the portrait orientation. The solution is to design adaptive layouts. On the design side, ...


4

I depends on the what you're mocking up (mobile v. pc). I find the Webalys PSD's pretty useful, and they have the added advantage that they're free. Axure is another common recommendation. If you're creating realistic mockups, why not just use good old HTML, CSS and JS? Mockups are useful as a rough tool to understand interaction, and for that high ...


4

If you want to produce a very quick, interactive, no-code prototype then you could try Flowella which is completely free and made by Nokia. It's available here and all you do is set a screen size, load in PNGs of all your screens and then create touch points around the buttons and drag to link them to their destinations. The final output is an interactive ...


4

Paper, pencil. I'm seconding jensgram and JohnGB. Be VERY wary of 'realistic' demos. They do things and feel like something that is real, but inevitably, they are not. The interactions are designed for the demo and the demo software, rather than the real app, and the real requirements of the production code. If the demo is merely a throw-away, then that's ...


4

After testing many programs and websites i found that Fireworks is a very good options in case you have it, and if you need to export the sketch to html or pdf. But the best in my point of view and what I do most of the the time is using a pencil and papers without using the computer.


4

As stated by them (androidpatterns.com) it's done in Fireworks (see attachement below) using their own custom Toolkit. You can download the toolkit here.


4

The best solution I can think of would be Keynote/PowerPoint. Keynote is especially well-suited for this task because its animation options are very comprehensive and you can export to a QuickTime/H.264 video including animations, transitions, etc. The alternative is to simply screen record mockups you've put together in HTML or some other mockup tool using ...


4

As mentioned above the Android Design Guide http://developer.android.com/design is a good place to start. If you are aiming at a more rough and sketchy prototype like the ones seen in Balsamiq, you should really try to draw some sketches using pen and paper. Many people are scared of picking up the sketchpad, my tip would be to have a real interface or ...


4

In my own experience, low-fidelity mockups are rarely clear to the people who are not familiar with wireframes even if they're accompanied with a full description or comments, so I don't think you should send them ahead of your demonstration because it may introduce wrong assumptions and expectations (as it was already mentioned by @JohnGB). But, taking ...


4

Mockflow.com and Moqups.com both offer the ability to share with others and edit in real time. You can also provide read-only access to anyone or export your ui mockup as a .pdf. Mockflow seems to be more developed and stable, but I personally prefer the user experience of moqups.


4

I employ a technique I call "MVW" Minimum Viable Wireframes : Put the least amount of effort into the wireframe that conveys the design and purpose to it's intended audience. If a napkin sketch gets the point across, great. If it's a whiteboard sketch that you and the developer make together and take a picture of, go with it. (My favorite) Both of ...


3

You might like the answers to these questions: What are some great web-based prototyping tools? Which prototyping tools?



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