New answers tagged

1

Yes, the tester has a point. He is thinking from end-user's perspective. So when user usually clicks some animation/click effect should be shown so as to show user that the click was successful. Imagine if the click effect is not there, user will click multiple times by mistake resulting in some weird operation maybe. Remember one of the golden rules of ...


1

Before answering the usability question, I want to make this note: The non-IOS functionality here would be correct, according to your code. There's no css:hover or css:active loadout. I don't know if it's a loading issue related to white flashes, or if it's an intentional change by iOS. But your site/element as is shouldn't be flashing. Can after-effects ...


0

Based on the little knowledge I have, you should not base your app behavior only on the OS (or device browser) default behavior, because it can (and will) be different. But rather provide your own behavior, this way users can recognize and expect your app to have the same workflow across devices, plataforms, browsers and so on. Doesn't matter where he access ...


0

You should put this question on http://www.stackoverflow.com/ - it's not related to UX. Basically the HTML element you are using for a click is DIV which could be an issue on non-iOS devices. Try replacing the clickable DIV with: <a id="clickabul"> I am Clickabul </a> It should work. EDIT If you are asking about which approach is ...


0

one time password (OTP) is implemented at server side via php and a third party service(in case of sending OTP via SMS). For an app, if you are using OTP for authenticating the user, it should always be manual,i.e, the authentication will be successful only after the user inputs the sent OTP. Otherwise, the whole OTP thing is useless. Consider this, I can ...


0

I'm wondering why you chose to use the view controller on iOS app. iPhone typically uses tabs for navigation while Android often makes use of menu (hamburger icon) for navigation. I know I have a hard time with how to deal with a drilled down navigation in a tabbed app but keeping the tabs and making good use of the back button and edit on the right hand ...


0

you have to user SliderPageControl https://github.com/honcheng/SliderPageControl-for-iOS/tree/master/SliderPageControl


2

Bootstrap, a very popular framework, uses 4 breakpoints, as below: /* Extra small devices (phones, less than 768px) / / No media query since this is the default in Bootstrap */ /* Small devices (tablets, 768px and up) */ @media (min-width: @screen-sm-min) { ... } /* Medium devices (desktops, 992px and up) */ @media (min-width: ...


0

when talking about icons, the UX design principles focus on creating / choosing the right icon for a given use case, not how the icon is created (whether or not it is mergerd / combined / mixed from 2 existing icons or created from scratch), see e.g. http://boxesandarrows.com/optimizing-ui-icons-for-faster-recognition/ though you can try to search for ...


1

I would go for the long page display. By introducing a scrollable container, you are opposing the interaction nature of mobile device (which is to scroll content). From here on, I'm going to refer the long page display as screen page. I can easily think of 3 implementation issues with the scrollable block approach: Given the screen height of tablet device ...


1

This seems to be tricky since you have to show so many informations on a very small display. Let's set on the user needs perspective, they probably are interested in comparing same informations about different products (for example comparing the "Screen size" for the 3 products. Your approach let the user see all informations of a single product, so the user ...


1

There may be some behavioural insights (or behavioural economics) research into this, but I would suspect the questionnaire first is a better way to go. My thinking is that you can start initially by collecting their name and email address people may hesitate to upload a photo if it's the first thing they're being asked to do people are more likely to add ...


3

If it was me, I would just have it as an option in the settings. The user can choose the time of day they'd like to be reminded, or whether they want it to be random between some set hours. After all, the user already knows that the Abusive Gym Reminder app is, well, going to annoy them with reminders, so why not empower them to choose when? This would ...


1

I think the answer would depend largely on the type of app and the primary user groups. There have certainly been some research and data for specific social media sites (e.g. facebook and twitter) when you should post to get the most amount of engagement from the users. However, you also have to take into consideration whether you have a global audience or ...


1

I would say late afternoon 5 or 6pm. This is the pattern I've seen in other apps. This will give the user the ability/chance to get to the gym after work or before bedtime.


3

I suppose there are 2 routes to approach this: Generic Approach - Work out the most common times people go Gym and use that Custom Approach - Ask or work out the users PERSONAL routine Generic Approach - This is the simplest approach, but will be tough to define as it would need to be a one size fits all. For example, I have the new version of ...


1

Use a scrollable block section, with a clear difference between that segment and the page (background color) and have a separate scroll bar for that. This would work on tablets as they are wide enough to have the padding, but may not work as well on mobile devices.


2

It's all in the convenience. Having everything in on place can arguably be considered more secure (Example: 1Password), but mainly, it's so you're not limited by the physical constraints of carrying everything. An extension of the Mobile Wallet are the apps that collect and store all your card numbers (like Air Miles, Grocery Points, Movie Points, etc). I ...


3

Good UX would be to use the guidelines for Android apps, which would be to NOT have a close button. But instead using all the app management solutions provided by Android OS. Android apps generally do not have close buttons. But instead have a designed interface that developers can use which makes the apps appear integrated in to the operating system and ...


6

Forget mobile breakpoints, there's no phone and tablet sizes outside marketing. Breakpoints should follow the content, not the screen size. As a simple example, let's consider the menu: Home | Products | Contacts Do you think you should ever provide a mobile menu? Do you really want to stick three elements in a hamburger menu? They can probably fit ...


2

The fact that this is an audio stream makes a difference to the user. If the sound is suddenly unwanted then you want to allow the user to kill it as quickly as possible, and the [X] is the most likely option to be used in this scenario. [X] is definitely a close / remove action, so it won't be a surprise that it immediately stops the stream.


0

You may want to provide some more context, but a simple popup menu sounds like a good idea.


2

When the item is being dragged, the panel could hide itself or move out of the way. Check out these demos from Codrops for inspiration. (Your interaction would be the opposite of most of these, but the principle is there.) Or, the panel could be on the top or bottom on mobile, instead of the side. This might be even more effective if the content is ...


2

There is little evidence of any specific apps or design features on mobile devices designed to reduce the risk of RSI. However there may be features that reduce the risk without that specific intent. There's a nice article in a medical journal from a few years ago interviewing an industrial designer at RIM (remember them?) which goes through some of the ...


5

Here is a good article that explains the problem and give some tips on how to solve it. Making Hit Areas Sufficiently Distinct Also there is a good read by nngroup Beyond Blue Links: Making Clickable Elements Recognizable About this problem in the desktop platform, there you can find some more tips on how to approach this issue. TL;DR Use some kind ...


5

The good and bad of bottom nav Bottom nav was a great idea when Apple first came out with it. Steve was laser-focused on one-handed usability. The bottom nav was designed to accommodate fast and convenient view switching where the mobile use case seemed to demand it. Unfortunately, bottom nav is a hierarchy nightmare when used for an app's main info ...


0

It depends on how frequently your users will use the navigation links. If its rarely then hamburger menu is ok. Otherwise top navigation will still do the work but the left most buttons will be a bit harder to tap (see image below). All 3 variants have their advantages and disadvantages, but the important thing is to choose the one that will fit best ...


2

One line answer to this is the Usability of choosing that position. When you hold your mobile in hand, your thumb immediately gets into action and the bottom position is easily accessible to it than the top. In the era of large screen devices it's difficult to hold the phone in hand and access the navigation placed on top. Which is why Apple has changed ...


3

I think you should reconsider the bottom navigation: Bottom navigation is very well established in mobile apps, far more so than top navigation, and there is good reason for this. In most cases i disagree with your point about incorrect information hierarchy - the content takes prime visual position in the interface, and the navigation is simply a tool for ...


0

Apps like Tinder use there gestures as part of their identity. Don't assume that users will necessarily understand "swipe right/left" unless it is made clear. Same goes for "swipe up/down". If your swipe left/right gestures are made clear, through iconography or marketing, be sure that your swipe up/down gesture is also clearly identified. Likely your ...


0

Yes there is. Swiping from the top activates an overpanel on both iOs and Android (I don't know about Blackberry). However, I don't think this is what you're looking for. The obvious reason against implementing it this way, is that it will conflict with the native behavior of your phone. Besides, how would the user know from where to swipe to trigger the ...


4

Question 1: Back button is totally needed! There is a few reasons for this. With a back button, you ensure consistancy accross devices and browsers. Each browser could have the button in different places, different shapes or even hidden in a submenu. Essentially, you maintain control of the experience. Not all user uses the back button in browser, myself ...


1

Apple uses a thing called the Tab Bar to solve this particular problem, sort of... It's supposed to give you different options/views of the same or similar data. In practice it's used a lot more like a tab between different modes of operation and different datas. I think this is your best possible approach, here, and will give you room to add more ...


1

Get a Huawei Mate 8 phone. This has a bizarre input shortcut: double knuckle -- double tap, to start video recording, and shows all touches within the recorded video. I am not kidding. Double tap the screen with two knuckles, instant video screen recording. Quite powerful device, 1920x1080 resolution recorded at 720p. Battery is very strong so you can do ...


2

The vertical list option with right hand transitions into the category is the "correct" answer to your problem. In @adamsoh's answer this is the first image. Something to consider - the words in this list are, mostly, heavy on reading. Here are some possible improvements: Weekly shop & prep Leftover friendly Fit (and delicious!) Nutritionally Complete ...


3

You seems to have a lot of links. I would usually reserve buttons for call-to-action and limit them to one or two. This is to prevent users from drowning in a sea of buttons and to differentiate them from normal links. The buttons show you a list of recipes for that category you would then click on them and drill down for the details If all the ...


0

Design for your users What device do the majority of your users access the app with? That's probably the one that will have the biggest impact on your success. So that's what you design for. If it's a close call, you design for multiple. Maybe one persona tends to be on iPhone 6 while another is on the 4. In that case, it's best to start small and scale ...


-2

Answer is easy. Design for all of them. Yes it takes more work but you will not exclude users from certain groups (iPhone 5 owners). This way you will have bigger user base, consequently more profit. To include all of the screen sizes possible use Responsive design or grid layouts. Bootstrap and Material design frameworks are the state of the art in this ...


8

In general, it's much easier to scale a design up from a smaller screen size to a larger screen size. So I always start with whichever is going to be the smallest device. When you're scaling up, you can always add whitespace and have a balanced design, but you have no such option when scaling down.


20

The iPhone 5/5s/se size. There are three key reasons: More people today still own the smaller 4-inch model than the larger models. That's also not likely to change thanks to the lifespan of the iPhone and the recent release of the iPhone se. So unless you are targeting only people with larger phones, best to stick with smaller and scale up, not the ...


0

As a developer and not a designer, I like to have my design on iPhone6 size. About the views,they should be scalable in some way. You have to make sure it's either scrollable up&down, so smaller devices can see all the content, or if it's not the case, you should have some kind of scalable view inside that will shrink if needed. Most of the time, my ...


0

Yes, indeed it cause trouble. 2 solutions: Ask your developer to make sure it works the way you want. Technically possible. Make the tap area bigger. The circle on the slider that you drag has to be either equal or greater than a minimum advisable touch target of 48DP. This will help you a lot since the probability of touching the remaining screen will be ...



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