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1

is [it] a good idea to have a responsive design or also have apps for different devices? Yes. Meaning, both are valid approaches. It's going to depend on a wide range of other factors as to which path you take (if not both paths).


1

First I would like to mention that you are actually bundle three questions in one – which is not such a good idea, since it's fairly unlikely you'll get all three quenstions answered in one thread: Is responsive design good for web based software? Should I develop native apps, even if my web based software has a mobild friendly / responsive design? Can ...


1

With the rise of mobile phones, I don't think you can afford not to do it responsively. This is essentially because many people will want to use the web from a mobile phone. I do it and I am not particularly... how to say it... a phone person, i.e. I'll mostly keep my phone in my coat when I am in work, so I don't look at it as much as other people. I do ...


0

When it comes to more than three top-level tabs in Android you can consider using a navigation drawer as Facebook for Android App uses. Android Guidelines show this example about the navigation drawer: The user can open the drawer panel by touching the navigation drawer indicator. In this case the "navigation drawer indicator" is placed on the ...


5

I believe the straightforward answer to this is a resounding yes. It would be a fantastic solution and one that clearly improves usability. I think that given our knowledge that passwords are often a combination of characters, numbers and symbols, it is fairly a no-brainer from a usability point of view to provide a keyboard with more keys on it for ...


0

Supposedly every good UI has a metaphor behind it. Now which direction is forward and backward? Obviously (to me) the right side is forward and the left side is backward. It seems that the metaphor of holding a book and turning pages is lost on you when holding a smart phone so the UI does not make sense. But then there is also Windows which most ...


2

The reason is quite simply (contrary to your experience) that it's proven easier to reach the bottom left corner if you hold the device with your right hand rather than the bottom right corner.


0

Sorry, no research. IMO it's not possible because the scope is too generic. "mobile users have a tendency to scroll very quickly down the page" Which users and what pages? I see some mobile users reading carefully an email, possibly in a Blackberry, while others gloss swiftly over a roster of Facebook comments. IMO "it depends" (sorry), in this ...


2

I've dealt with this in a previous project. User testing (in our case ) confirmed your hypotheses 1. recipients are not pleased / ignore notifications from an unknown app. 2. It's more work and there is a ramping up phase in using the users mail platform. Our solution was to stress privacy and explain why it would be coming from the user. When the user ...


0

Avoid long forms on a mobile. You can split the same long form into multiple pages. The most feasible option would be splitting the form into multiple sections depending on the question group. Vertical scrolling in mobile is fine but club it with quick links. The above image depicts various sections and the fields the first section holds.


1

Android I think that Android Guidelines about navigation are an interesting and very useful read. In particular, I think that it's helpful to refer to the difference between: The Up button - which is used to navigate within an app based on the hierarchical relationships between screens. For instance, if screen A displays a list of items, and ...


0

Since you seem to be using anchors already, instead of using a back button you could also implement a button that says "start" or "home" or "top" and let that link to the top of the page. This is less confusing for people that enter the page at a specific anchor point (email-use-case) and would also be js-free. The button wouldn't have to be implemented on ...


0

In my opinion, pages should never ever use Javascript back. Why would I want to click a back button on your page? There is already a browser function for that. I will use that if I want to go back. Links should link to actual places, not Javascript trickery that confuses browser interface with web navigation. So, I would definitely prefer a menu in this ...


1

Well, you probably don't want to separate Delete and Copy. They are both actions that affect the same item, and are so often part of the same menu that your users might expect them to be together. The action bar is a good pick for grouping actions (hence the name). In order to save space AND have relevant actions together, you might just switch to a ...


0

It sounds like you need to rework your menu system/grouping. For a mobile application this seems like too many menu options. Assuming you keep the same grouping you could consider collapsing all groups except the one you are in. That includes any sibling level menus. Example assume Three 5 - 3 is selected. Your menu would look like this: Top One Top Two ...


2

I can attest from experience that in apps or mobile & desktop sites, prompting users to leave reviews does lead to a greater numbers of reviews being left. The key is to prompt users at the right times. For example, in an ecommerce context, after the product has been received, for job search, when the candidate has been offered a position. These points ...


1

Yes, you should never force any user for the responsive designs. Specially, the Ecommerce industry knows this well enough. Many of the users who found that the mobile websites they were using contained less features than the one with the desktop version were greatly outraged. As, a result many ecommerce websites offers a way to revert back to the old desktop ...


1

I'm not sure that a link will make anyone more inclined to leave a review, but it will definitely make them more likely to leave one. You don't need it, you see it, you buy it One of the most important concepts in UX is visibility - whether or not users are aware of the options they are facing, or the actions they can take. Another aspect here is ...


1

I notice that you have both view tabs and edit tabs in the same hierarchy. To most people, tabs organize viewed data into logical sections, not separate different tasks (such as edit meta, description, and images). So your Overview, Stats, and Mods can stay as they are, but the rest of them should be transferred to the Overview pane as buttons or items in a ...


0

In most cases, the way that you would advertise the existence of these options would be to show badges like that on the homepage of your website or wherever your app is acquired. If your app is downloaded from a site somewhere, that's where I'd put some kind of note or badge. If you app is distributed through some other means, you may need to look into ...


0

How about using borders. Reply 1 border line will enclose reply 1-1, 1-2 and 1-1 encloses 1-1-1, 1-1-2 and so on.


1

I would also consider just providing an input for the user to insert their desired campaign name, and underneath it have a bound paragraph (like in Angular) displaying in a small font the complete URL, updating as the user types. You can easily implement it with a bit of jQuery and on/keydown or have it built-in in any Javascript webapp framework.


0

Can't you break it over multiple lines at small resoultions? Treat the first (grey) section as a label, and set the input field left aligned under it. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups That should be possible with just CSS, so long as you've marked up the grey box as a label element in the html and not as an input ...


0

I like the idea of Microsoft has done in their office for iPad apps. It's auto save by default, but the user can turn it off. When they choose to switch it off it then enables the save button.


4

Let's take a look at what other applications do Applications on macs and windows (from what I recall for windows... been a while since I've used a windows machine) prevent the user from moving forward before they decide whether they want to save or discard changes. The reasoning behind that is because if the user leaves the application, then a ...


1

In the article "Icon Usability" published on July 27, 2014 Aurora Bedford by Nielsen Norman Group states that “Universal” Icons Are Rare". In particular: There are a few icons that enjoy mostly universal recognition from users. The icons for home, print, and the magnifying glass for search are such instances. Outside of these examples, most icons ...


2

I think a slider that has stepped values should work reasonably well on a mobile device too, especially if you don't have to be very precise with the distance. The end points can be a minimum distance, and the maximal value can be everywhere.


1

It's quite common for previous searches to appear in a drop down list below the search boxes as soon as focus goes into the box - or even for a dedicated search page, simply to automatically show the saved or recent searches in a list without having to manually make that happen. This then allows the previous searches to be sensibly filtered or ordered as ...


1

I don't like the icon. Usually the diskette is the symbol for saving something, not displaying a list. Since you have a lot of space why don't you use a button with label "Saved Searches ...", just below the "Search" button. See image below : EDIT by OP in other parts of the app is an icon that allows you to access the saved search list


3

You can use a numeric stepper. The user may enter the value with the keyboard, or use the up/down arrows. The default value should be empty (no distance filter). EDIT : See comment by @FodderZone download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


0

Don't make it too complex just: Avoid dialog popups on mobile as it distracts, interupts flows and increases mental effort. And your popup-ad won't work in terms of CTR because it is annoying. Don't use dialogs like "Do you want download/signup/etc" just present one link for it to do. Use plattform specific convention for the order of ok/cancel. Check ...


2

These guidelines existed even before Android L. Yes, it applies to all notifications, including ongoing (in progress). If you have two notifications of the same type, you should summarize them into one. Optionally, you can provide an expanded view that provides individual details. If you are only uploading one at a time you can consider the following ...


0

Don Norman ("father of UX") talked about this fairly often, and finally he posted an article talking about this very big question: do I put ok first or last? His conclusion was it didn't matter, but what does matter is being consisted throughout your interfaces. Switching the order continuously throughout will cause the biggest problem. One way of making ...


0

I would agree with Vincent (based on the research done by Nielsen Norman Group), but would even take it a step forward by saying consistency within the application is probably what is most important here. If you have the "OK" button on the right and then switch it to the left on the next dialog, this inconsistency is what is going to trip users up more than ...


0

How about showing one feature across all 3 packages at a time, let the user hit like button on one of these and keep going. Finally summarize the likes - package more likes win!


1

I think that the study "The Value of Haptics: A summary of published findings on the value of haptic feedback in human-computer interaction" provides interesting information about this subjects. On page 6 you can find a list of contexts where haptic stimulation is ideal for communication: Private information: haptic feedback is silent, non-visual, ...


0

As a research excercise it'd be good to take a look at what the founders of the on-screen keyboard (OSK), Apple, are working on now. iOS 8 predicts what you’ll likely say next. No matter whom you’re saying it to. Now you can write entire sentences with a few taps. Because as you type, you’ll see choices of words or phrases you’d probably type ...


2

I found this particularly insightful : http://www.colormatters.com/color-symbolism/global-color-survey. After taking the survey, the results were as follows. Over 130,000 people from all points on the globe took the survey. Here are the results: Happy - Yellow Pure - White Good Luck - Green Good-tasting - Red (tomato) Dignity - Dark Blue High Technology ...


4

Interesting question. According to Jacob Nielsen: “The Back button is the lifeline of the Web user and the second-most used navigation feature (after following hypertext links). Users happily know that they can try anything on the Web and always be saved by a click or two on Back to return them to familiar territory.” But that was 1999 and ...


0

You could use a compare by feature/item view, where: Each screen contains one package You can navigate between packages by dragging screen left/right You can see how each package measures in comparison to the others per feature/item, via an icon You can hide/reveal features/items that are/aren't important to you You can reorder features/items according to ...


1

When clients say they want to transmit something, I normally ask them for examples of what products, logos or slogans they have in mind at that time. My idea of luxurous may not be exactly the same of my client, so through examples and exploring more of their public I can have more of those informations. Maybe people from one country think golden colors ...


2

Have you tried combining the collapsable accordion along with a detail view? It gives a nice fluid feeling, especially when the expand/collapse animations are done properly:


0

How are the packages set up? If you have some leverage in the product design of the packages, knowing that they'd be bought on a smartphone, then you could think about streamlining. A good example of could be: Package 1 | $30 4 Apples 1 Bunch bananas 1 Bunch grapes Package 2 | $40 Package 1 Plus: 4 pears Fruit wash Package 3 | $45 Package 2 ...


1

You could use a scrolllist for the FAQ questions instead of a accordion. If you press e.g. on "Question 3" the detail view for question 3 is moving smoothly from right to left. If you press on "< Back" the FAQ list is moving from left to right. In addition you can offer buttons to switch to next or previous question in the detail views. download ...


0

Many users prefer physical keyboards that have a degree of click to them because this acts as a confirmation that their action was positive. Research has shown this affects actual performance Each subject is given a poem and asked to type after a practice with device. Lab session showed that with tactile feedback users entered significantly more ...


0

Accordion can be a good solution, if it would be combined with some kind of categories. You can just split all your questions to 4-6 categories for example. You can also use any other layout instead of accordeon, but categorizing is a must in any case here.


0

A haptic feedback is used to strengthen the feedback for a normal user, post visual implication of the action taking place, so it should always be used to make the user a repeat feedback other than visual and audio that should make him more conscious amongst the audio/visual biases.


1

If we're talking iPhones 40px on a non-retina screen is the same height as 40px on a retina screen. The device doubles the height accordingly as needed on retina to make sure it's physically the same size.


0

The ActionSheetPicker library seems to do this pretty well.


1

You need to prioritize your requirements and place appropriate buttons on the map. You can place the buttons near any of the four corners(with some margin ofcourse) An example would be: Place the 'my-location' button on the map. this is so that the user can quickly return to his current location. For me, even though it takes some space, it is something ...



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