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This might be harsh, but if you need 10 pages to explain an app you might reconsider your design. Is it possible to put part of this explanation into the app itself, using tooltips and empty page fillers? Regarding long texts. If the text is boring, rewrite it to be more engaging. People read long books without images and quotes without any problems.


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I would recommend the reverse of what you described. Instead of having a button that allows you to scroll, show a static map, as Brett East described, with a caption/button of something like "Press to Open". In order to control the map, the user can press (or long-press) on the static map, which links to a new view with full-screen zoomable/draggable map ...


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To explain the restriction issue: A lot of this depends on the device. Normally, responsive styling uses the width of the screen to set the width and layout of the page. This should mean that, when a device is rotated, the change in screen width between the portrait and landscape orientations triggers different layouts. However, some devices declare their ...


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There are no hard and fast rules. You may pick and choose however you feel best fits your application style and needs. However, there are general guidelines that each mobile platform proposes to enhance the consistency and usability of apps on their platform. You may choose to follow these guidelines if you wish to make your app "fit in" better within a ...


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What do you think of using a colored status bar, like GPS or phonecalls do on iOS. By using this bar, you could allow the user to edit the filter by taping on it, or provide a simple "remove" button to discard it.


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The solution might be having pinch to zoom option(with two fingers) for maps. When one finger is used only page scroll should happen. Most mobile users I came across uses one finger to scroll and pinch(with two fingers) to zoom. This may also be a better solutin http://stackoverflow.com/questions/15327783/enable-scrollwheel-zooming-on-a-map-upon-click-using-...


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I completely understand the problem that you have, it can me quite common on mobile devices. My recommendation would be to not add the padding down the right, and instead make the map not drag or zoom on scroll at certain widths or for touch devices. Here is a link to a good article on the matter https://coderwall.com/p/pgm8xa/disable-google-maps-scrolling-...


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You can place the ad between the buttons as bottom area of the screen will be in more focus because of these two buttons there. Also, I don't see an issue of being clicked unwillingly as user knows which area of the screen represents the button. Logically, this is like clicking a button on the Physical device say a calculator.


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You need to mention your intentions that what you expect from the users. If you badly want users to tap on your ad (intentionally or unintentionally) you can place it between the buttons. The present generation using the smart phones are aware of the banner ads and they'll probably be careful. But the older users might just press it mistakenly and that's ...


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In terms of user experience it would be better to do a sidebar or similar as Lucas suggested, but there are ways of showing chapters on the timeline directly. (I apologize for the poor design quality in these mockups) First you can start with chapter dots on the timeline to give the user some idea of where each chapter is. Then the user is able to drag ...


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This relates as much to UX patterns as it does to operating system patterns. When you learn a bit of Swift, you realize it's not about "hiding the bottom navigation", but actually about using a different form of presentation for the content you're about to show. If you're designing for iOS, Apple describes it best in the iOS Human Interface Guidelines: ...


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IMHO, it depends on the origin (bookmarks by you, or comments by users?) and quantity of markers, as well as amount of text (within the markers) and length of video. Think about how these variables influence one another. I see you already adopted soundcloud's pattern for comments on a timeline—which is beautiful—but it's clearly more appropriate for ...


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For your question, I like to use the Scrollbar's methods to the advantage of determining if the user wants to see more or not. Depending on what the booking is for, the majority of the use-cases will mostly have the user wanting to view/edit/cancel the recent bookings possibly done in the same week/month. If you could say - place an upper limit to how ...


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If I was looking for one of my booking, in your case, I would like it to be loaded already, as, sometimes you are really out of time or frustrated and get anxious on little some things. I strongly recommend: First be a user then, be a designer. Think what should you have done in that place. As, throughout my life experience and personal life survey, ...


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We as designers should follow the existing design patterns which are widely accepted and used. If and when you break away from a pattern you should be really clear about how is it helping in improving the usability of the application and moreover how is it helping the user with attaining his goal. In your case you should go with the "Load More" button. ...


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One more reason: The user might not actually be using a mobile device currently, but might just have been following a link posted by someone using the mobile site. (Of course, this only applies if your site actually has different URLs for mobile and "desktop".)


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Just a quick suggestion, you could possibly disable the submit button, but have the text on it change to 'Submitting...' and also disable all of the form fields, so that the user can't then submit the form using the keyboard. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups I don't know about the feasibility of adding a loading ...


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I would do both 1 and 2, but also present the user with a message. Having a message will guide the user's expectation and avoid unnecessary concern by the user. The message doesn't have to say much, even just that the form is submitting and will take up to 30s.


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The way that most desktop sites appear on mobile means that making the text size larger isn't going to be quite as helpful as you might like and may break the layout - potentially making the experience even worse. From an ecommerce point of view, my suggestion would be to have another look at your Google Analytics and see where in the funnel most of your ...


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Swipe left or right options are for 'navigations' and 'more' actions. It sounds good for your requirement. Swipe down option is not good to go option for the details. Here is my solution better to go with Tap to open details keep the top image section with reduced size, make it fixed In this solution everything in one screen with less action User can ...


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You can have "read more" at the end of your first screen for every items.. So users can swipe left, swipe right and click on "read more" to see full description for interested items.. Once user clicked, you can open new screen with fixed tob bar containing back button/ close button and title of items. The image and full description can be provided.. ...


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You could use keywords and delimiters to have the code automatically parse the text and format it in a small preview window. For your example: John Doe // First line is always the name @ Company Best Inc. // use @ symbol to denote company name line disc this, this and that. // the line starting with the disc keyword is the discussion info appt ...


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I personally prefer the Second method since it ensures two things. Quality onboarding and diving right into what your app provides. If getting a user to register is your mission, the quality of onboarding needs to be on point. This leads to more creative solutions on how one can give the user an immersive and awesome experience and then at the Success/ ...


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You can make access open and restrict access to some key features until a user has created an account - if a user tries to access the restricted features you can prompt them to create the account. Another approach is to make the barrier to entry very low, i.e. only ask for an e-mail address, and nothing else (not a password, username, etc.) The lower the ...


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I'm sorry but icons simply aren't the primary content here. Icons are nice. Labels are good. Good labels are critical. If there are so many buttons or controls that it's a struggle to include the accompanying text, then it's the structure of the layout that's at fault not the inclusion of the labels. Take a step back. Lets say the labels are non negotiable ...


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I think you should go with help-mode switch because a lot of users are going to use it when they get lost and more advance users would understand the icons as longest is good iconography. Don't rely in first screen tutorials because it is been prove people skip those all the time. no matter how many animations you add they don't work trust me Force touch ...


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Yes, You can use a Bluetooth keyboard with most mobile, and some smart phones allows the display to be sent to a TV or monitor. So you don't know if a smart phone is being used with a small touch screen. Also mobile versions of sites often have bugs in them..... (For example the mobile version of gmail stopped working on my smart phone for a few weeks.)...


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If the sub-categories are not more than 2 in each category then show it upfront, by placing category as title. This way you will not confuse the user and also you are not hiding the information. But if you have more category with sub-categories then you have to find a work around on IA.


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If there's no way to get around submenus, the key is to provide a clear visual difference between levels and making it clear which main menu the submenu corresponds to. There's probably a million different ways you could do that, but the most common tend to involve changes in: Indentation Color Font size, weight, or family Spacing/delimiters Casing In ...


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This article outlines the most common mobile navigation patterns and should help you choose the right navigation approach for your scenario: https://www.nngroup.com/articles/mobile-navigation-patterns/


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Don't use pages. Instead, load more is more effective on small touchscreens, because it's easier to tap accurately and avoids page reloads. As for how many you should load, that same study proposes 15 to 30 items. Any more, and users start needing to scroll too far. Fewer, and users get annoyed that they have to keep tapping all the time. The study's images ...


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I'm partial to still opening new tabs. The advantage to opening a new tab is allowing the user to fork their browsing session like the would on desktop. Most mobile browsers (at least Chrome) have the back button set up to close the new tab to maintain the linear flow for the user if that's how they're navigating.


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I think some people have over-analysed this question. The answer in my view is always 'no' and there are 2 simple reasons for this: If it's a repsonsive website then there's effectively no such thing as a 'desktop version' which negates the question. The responsive layout should work in a way where elements are rendered appropriately to the device but it's ...


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A carousel is a tried and trusted metaphor which has been around for a long time, and you can carousel through all 30 thumbnails if you want. Users will be familiar with this metaphor. The Facebook example shown by @Grafix Guru is not a carousel (clicking takes you to another page where the images are stacked vertically in a scrollable page), however the ...


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Yes it is necessary. Having Desktop site is good if the mobile site is not working in any case or if the user is unable to get the exact flow of activities. Now a days as mobile users are increasing, every site should be responsive enough which will remove this option of "Desktop site". Now if a particular site is made separately for mobile and desktop (...


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I think this is done when a site's desktop version is well established, and they are "grafting on" a very different mobile site, perhaps developed by a different team. Either because the website Is The Product and is extremely well evolved and tuned, with many internal stakeholders, and they can't afford to break stuff (think Amazon or Yahoo homepage)... ...


2

Follow the Facebook method. Assume if you have 20 photos to show and you have space of accommodating 5 photos then add '+15' on the the black overlay of the 5th photo thumbnail image. Refer the attached screenshot for more info


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Steve Krug's opinion In Don't Make Me Think, Revisited, Chapter 10 deals with mobile usability. Steve Krugg states the following (emphasis mine): Always provide a link to the "full" Web site. No matter how fabulous and complete your mobile site is, you do need to give users the option of viewing the non-mobile version, especially if it has features and ...


1

As others have said, the trend originally came about because of the way full sites were ported to mobile devices. Early on, people were taking established sites and scrunching them down to work with the mobile technology and save on bandwidth. This meant changes in resolution, orientation, and browser capabilities. Features would often be removed along with ...


2

Users in shopping mode tend to be rather passive, so I wouldn't require more than 1 click. A simple, small textlink saying something like "This listing is missing information" in a corner of the product view would probably not alienate your third parties, but it would get you the data you need to point you to the content you may want to review. Clicking ...


1

Possibly not even if there's a difference between your sites. At least if your user-agent handling works properly. Example: SE on Android mobile has a "full site" link at the bottom. I only realised that when I went looking for it to post this answer. The browser's own menu option for "request dekstop site" is easier to find for two reasons: the menu is ...


2

It's both annoying and confusing: Annoying because it's covering the images. Confusing because it is out of context. You're on a page where you are looking for offers nearby, there's no reason to include a Sell It button. I recommend you look at this app called Saily for benchmarking. The option for "Buy it" or "Sell it" shouldn't be available on the ...


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I'm assuming this is a Direct Primary Action similar to Instagram's New Photo button. Is it annoying? No. Is it confusing? Hell yes. Reasons that it is confusing: The button is floating. If you want to have a Floating Action Button, you could use the Android Design Support Library and use the FAB itself without any text needed. On Android, it looks like ...


4

Yes, If desktop users are shown a different version of the site. This is a usability issue. I have seen so many sites that do not display properly on small screens or that do not serve the same content. (usually 'quickmenus'/reduced to content allegedly 90% of users want, not me!)


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Why did this trend come about? For developing websites there are three major approaches toward how they are developed*: Responsive Web Design Adaptive Web Design Separate "Desktop" and "Mobile" sites Responsive Web Design (RWD) is where a site is designed in a way that it changes to fit whatever screen size it is rendered on. From a technological ...


2

There's a very good read from Aurora Bedford on icon usability: https://www.nngroup.com/articles/icon-usability/ and there's a section arguing that "icons need a text label": To help overcome the ambiguity that almost all icons face, a text label must be present alongside an icon to clarify its meaning in that particular context. (And even if you’re ...


0

A fullscreen modal would be a solution. See example below from Producthunt. With this approach, both the close button in the top left corner and the browser back button can be used since the modal page has it's own url. The search results page: https://www.producthunt.com/search The modal: https://www.producthunt.com/tech/stack-overflow-jobs


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It is necessary if you have different versions of the website for Desktop and Mobile. For example, a lot of websites scrap out features that might get too complicated to be operated on Mobile. For example, Facebook's Mobile version does not feature all of its settings. It is also possible that a large tablet which can process a webpage faster like a ...


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I agree with @JonStory where if you have both sites, there is no reason to not offer the option of visiting the full desktop site. Especially if technologies are potentially in place that mobile cannot utilize (Java, Flash). On modern sites with Mobile-First development, there is potentially no reason to have a desktop site (ex: Bootstrap sites generally). ...



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