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You have talked about what you want the user to do, but you haven't described it in terms of what your user actually wants to accomplish. Your user does not want to input anything. They might have to input something as a means to their end. You haven't described their end. "A summary of stock performance over time" also isn't the user's goal. It might ...


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I would suggest something like below Separate the Notification by date Usability wise user will be easily distinguish the notification by date It frees the space for date/time I would suggest to put the time on right, Reason it'll always take limited space on screen since date part it gone :) You can change the color of component according to your ...


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At tradus.com We use the below We show the entire cart in first scroll. In second scroll we show the address / payment options. The header button changes according to the information filled. i.e If the address / payment information is filled , the button says "Payment>" which take user to payment. Else we show "Checkout" which actually scroll down to ...


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One of the first things to do when attempting to design a UI is to determine what information you need to display to the user, and I know this sounds like a no-brainer, but it's actually a very important step. Once you have a list of this (for you something like "stocks, return, time period, etc.") you can begin to see how the different data sets or ...


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The best checkout experience for me personally has been through the Poshmark iphone app. I use it often just to quickly check the total price including shipping and if I think it's too expensive, I can get back to my item easily using the back button. It takes just two clicks to make a purchase on this app if your details have been entered once. You could ...


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How many inputs should be presented on each page? And does this depend on categorisation of inputs? My thought is the grouping of the inputs is more important than the number. For example, the workflow for setting up an iOS device is divided into screens for language, Wi-Fi, location services, etc. The number of inputs for each grouping is less ...


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The UX here depends on the type of input , user have to provide. Radio button [ 1 ] Check-box [ 1 ] Selection from a drop-down [ 1.5 ] Text inputs small ( 3 or less word in single field ) [ 2 ] Text inputs big ( 4 or more in single field ) [ 2.5 ] Now check your form pages, and try to use the elements in such a way that the sum stays less than 6-8 ...


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The admin/building and the preview interfaces will either be displayed and visible simultaneously or alternatively. Displaying them simultaneously : pros : very user friendly, no need for navigation, possibility to implement a real-time refresh as the user changes something in the admin/building interface cons : smaller interfaces because the interface ...


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My recommendation, if this is possible for you, is to include a user name or use their email address as a user name. Let's look at what this gets you if you do this. 1) If they get a new phone and maintain their old phone number, you can simply send them a text, have them respond in whatever way you want to prove it's them, and they're in. 2) If the get a ...


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I don't think you have a UX issue here as you already solved that. It's more of a UI problem with the flatness of your design. There is no affordance here. Am I supposed to tap or click on N/A... You see what I mean? Make them look like you should touch them. If its a survey I would also consider to definitely NOT pre-select anything as you showed in your ...


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The technical term for that is "Incremental Filtering". It's always hard (particularly in mobile) to show big sets of data, but IF the user is going to know who to send this to right away, for example, if the user is going to have the addressee already in mind, the expected behavior is for the user to start typing the friend's name, and this is optimum. I ...


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The only scenario in which you could avoid a separate authentication mechanism (for example a password) is when the user has both devices or SIM cards at hand. I assume sim card id is equal to phone number to keep it easy, you should have no problem to extend the examples. User has neither the old sim card nor the old phone. (For example after a year at a ...


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Long press to enable selection mode : *User will tap to view a image (do you have this feature ?) User will long press on a image to enable selection mode, (when this mode is on) user then tap on other images to select multiple images. This is most convenient process of multiple selection in smartphones in modern day OS.*


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how about having a check mark and a cross next to the yes and no to make it more visually understandable. is there's a certain reason to use yes,no,n/a in that particular order? is it a best practice? there might be a tendency to get more 'yes' responses.


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Very interesting question. I think this pattern may probably help different kind of users to feel instantly familiar. Mentioned facebook chat icon is obviously the same icon I can see on the website. So first time I open the facebook App, I won't be confused about where the chat is hidden but I will immediately see the icon which teach me this. Next time I ...


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Totally agree with answers here that you should never disable zooming. Luckily there is a way to deal with those nasty sites, forcing your into reading their uncomfortably small text, at least on the IOS: http://stackoverflow.com/a/5932683/1614973 And yes, it also works for the native apps! Just as it should be.


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It depends on how you do that exactly. If you have one action at different locations of the app and the user has to use gesture 1 in location 1 but has to use gesture 2 in location 2 this is VERY bad. The user has to remember which gesture does what where. If you allow the user to use multiple gestures for one specific action and all of these gestures do ...


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This is more of an algorithmic problem, but it is worth keeping in mind that some languages do not have the distinction of upper- and lowercase. E.g. Japanese (they also don't have the concept of bold text). And some letters do not exist in an uppercase variant, e.g. the German "ß" ('sharp S') is a strictly lowercase letter1 as there are no words that start ...


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There are very few advantages to using all caps, and that is why we usually don't. When we read text, largely what our brains are doing is recognizing the overall shape of words, rather than the individual letters. Lowercase letters have different sizes and visual densities; some have ascenders sticking up, or descenders sticking down. This means that ...


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Multiple user actions to get to the same effect is not necessarily bad. The chat button is the obvious way, the swipe is the fast way. An analogy on the desktop would be menu items (obvious) and keyboard shortcuts (fast). (I don't think anyone's ever suggested keyboard shortcut's are any kind of anti-pattern, but not positive.) Of course on a touch UI ...


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I think there a few very solid reasons to allow one area of content to be accessed by multiple gestures. User education and the introduction of new features being two of them. In the Facebook example you mention, I think the chat icon serves as a stepping stone. After touching the icon and witnessing the animation / location of the friends list, Facebook ...


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If you think about it, the default iOS guidelines somewhat reflects Jef Raskin's idea about zooming interfaces: As you work your way deeper into the navigation hierarchy transition animations will slide you towards right and if you move back they will slide you to the left. If there is some sort of contextual popover it will always slide in from the ...


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Actually, it gets even weirder. You will want to use tables for formatting and put your styles just after <body> instead of in <head>. There are lots of gotchas, like no background images. Psst: it's pretty much all because of Outlook. Surprised? Your best bet is to use a test service like https://litmus.com/ or even a physical device lab to ...


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Although the usage of bottom bars is encouraged, it doesn't seem like you would need them for your application. A 'plus' icon at the top right would serve as an add button. A delete could be implemented by swiping the item to the side. You could replace the more button in the image below to share instead. You could always display a short tutorial to ...


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I would suggest a Back icon in both scenarios. It will provide a consistent look. Also, I don't feel anything wrong with displaying a Back icon on a screen where you move through Navigation icon.


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According to Apple's official iOS Human Interface Guidelines, page 147, "A toolbar always appears at the bottom edge of a screen or view on an iPhone". Therefore, I would recommend following their recommendations.


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Since your context is people and landscapes I would go with the latter for the following reasons: The letter-boxing is ugly (well, I think so), especially when a group of images is viewed as it takes away from their uniformity. Ugly or not it is certainly distracting. For landscapes it will not particularly matter if part is cropped. It will still ...


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Most mice only support vertical scrolling. In mac os you can hold shift (maybe you can in windows too?) to make the scroll wheel horizontal, but don't expect the average user to know that. Once people use tablets, though, horizontal scrolling should not be a problem. How is your business data organized? If it is an excel-like table view with potentially a ...


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A con I see immediately is the use of the mouse wheel, unless you are able to override the default vertical behaviour with an horizontal one. UPDATE: The same is valid for the Page Up and Page Down keys. May be you want them to behave like the List Mode of Windows Explorer.


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Horizontal navigation is really good, but only when the user is actually doing a swipe action across the screen. To put this in another way, its good on handheld touch devices. A Web App might not be good target for horizontal navigation unless its made in a really wise way. Now from the way I understand the working of your app, the illustration on the ...


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I see the main pro as the user's retention of orientation within the app. If the horizontal scrolling keeps a portion of the list visible when the edit fields are toggled as illustrated in your example, it should be clear to the user how to return to the list (whether through a swipe gesture, 'back' button or 'cancel' button referring to the cancellation of ...


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If the user changes his/her phone, and want to continue its service, in such situation, system should validate the phone number by sending a confirmation message to the user. And once the user is validated against the new Device id and Sim ID then update these information in the system, so that previous app in the old device will become inactive.


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The easiest thing for the user is probably a textfield - that'll make it easy to delete any bits of the text they don't want. Something like this perhaps? I've left out the 'exact match' option: it makes it simpler for the user, and I suspect that there are very few cases where the user needs to do an exact match where a substring match wouldn't work.


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Are you always selecting complete words as triggers? If so, you could use completion: User types "B", system proposes "Belfast" and "Belfast account", user selects second one. Or, the user taps trigger words to include in rule. Esp. the last idea depends heavily on the task familiarity and training - it sounds you have a rather specialized task which is ...


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This quickly turns into a bit of a fight over words, but as I see it these sites are "only" adaptive (AWD). As you see in the Brad Frost article RWD is a subset of AWD. Ethan Marcotte defines the core ingredients of RWD to be fluid grids, flexible media and media queries. These sites don't have fluid grids (at least not on their desktop viewport sizes). ...


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In iOS, they use a "Picker" Check out the documentation. Edit: In context you have a couple options. On iPhone, if the selection is part of a table view, then the picker can appear in the list like so: If the selection item is standalone, then the picker should appear at the bottom of the screen, similar to the keyboard. (I couldn't find a good iOS 7 ...


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Not sure what your question actually is about but a bunch of thoughts: If there's a rationale for displaying the previous value then one should always be able to see it -- regardless of whether the screen is in landscape or portrait mode. LinkedIn does this when editing your profile in a secondary language by showing your original language entry below the ...



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