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1

This is actually something I did on a recent website I designed. It's not a sidebar menu on desktop, rather a secondary menu (that doesn't show up in the main nav, only in the concerned pages, just like University of Chicago in your example.) but I think the challenge on mobile is the same. As you said, there is a usability challenge in stacking up ...


1

Give them any information you can. If you can tell them whats coming up thats a plus. This way they can focus their mind on whats coming up and possibly start to think about it and get in the mindset to use whats about to load. You can use this to remind them what they are waiting for and to encourage them to actually wait for it. Remember users have short ...


-1

As a user I HATE this new button.... because it obstructs what you are trying to view and there is no way of moving it.. screen real estate is small enough even on my 5.5" LG G3, and when I am viewing a list, or a picture, I certainly don't want to have this freakish button blocking my viewing.. that is what the title bar is for... have an action it the ...


5

TL;DR It all depends on what you want to show your users and the message you are trying to send with the data. Long version: So what you describe are two methods of visualizing a map called "Equal Interval" (absolute) and "Quantile" (relative). The Equal Interval Method makes sure that the same number of values are in each classification set. So in ...


1

Due to limited screen space, you should have it close after the user has made their selection. Because the user will have the ability to dig into the menu (and submenus), they will be able to see all their available options before selecting one. Once the user selects one, the odds of them wanting to immediately select another menu option are slim to none. ...


0

I would keep it closed due to limited space. If you want to go back to the page you can open it again. But users are not that likely to mess that up and being forwarded to a new page would be pretty annoying if the first thing you need to do is close the hamburger menu to get it out of your way to start browsing. Here are some popular examples that close ...


0

The scrollable “flipper” for one important reason. When in that format, it shows relationship to other data points (the years before and after) and this helps to focus the user’s mind in a time-based thought process, which is the desired cognitive state for recalling and asserting this type of information. Users lose focus or forget what they’re doing; ...


0

Your question does not stipulate how the user will deliver the desired information. I see 2 methods, physically delivering the card/ID to the recipient, and digitally providing the data. The latter doesn't fit your use cases, so I'll answer for the former. The answer is challenging because there are multiple ways to accept information inputs, but the ...


3

In the process of developing a new app (releasing next week), we ran into this exact problem. We originally included a date picker, but went back to the drawing board because we realized we didn't ask the right question. For us, it was straight text inputs, no pickers or options. So, apologies, but you're not asking the right question either. What is the ...


0

I prefer the scroll-able in iOS. A key UX principle is to be consistent with industry standards. Jakob Nielsen had this on his famous 10 usability heuristics for UI design (see "follow platform conventions" Furthermore Most of the time for current dates and birth dates the user wont do much scrolling. You can also put multiple wheels if your date ranges are ...


0

Scrolling from 2015 to some older years can be a pain, I suggest a two digit (not four) entry field. It is the fastest way, and the first two digits in a birth year are unneeded.


3

I work in the mobile sphere and we have terrible trouble with gestures. Firstly, everyone wants them. What a lot of clients fail to appreciate is Gmail et al are purpose built apps where the gesture usual conforms to an action, so broad use isn't appropriate. Secondly, there's often little visual indication that a swipe gesture is available, so in a UX/UI ...


0

The issues with using gestures in mobile sites is more of a developmental limitation, in my opinion. In the event of an error, you risk losing essential functionality if a gesture is key in navigating throughout a site. We see gestures in apps because they are developed for specific devices using the method that is made FOR that device (i.e. Swift, etc). ...


0

I agree with NO. Immersive is a heavy word to me. In regard to an interface I think of Coopers interface postures and his sovereign posture which is reserved for large feature applications used continuously at full screen on a standard monitor. As an owner of a Pebble and an Android Wear watch I feel the nature of a smart watch should be transient in ...


6

Android has an official guide from Google. And iTunes too So, to avoid Copyrights issues and all kind of related stuff I suggest to follow their guidelines.


0

The short answer, Yes, they can be immersive but if only the user wants to get immersed in them. The focus however should be on getting the content to the user quickly and contextually The long answer Apple's products branding philosophy is completely based upon establishing personal connections between the users and their products enabling them to ...


1

What you need is not abstract percentages which seem needlessly specific anyway, but statuses that shed a positive light onto the current situation. These should be visualizable in a symbol/icon and phrasable in few English words. The following examples are just a shot from the hip, since I’m not really a pub guy: 0% – relaxing atmosphere 20% – instant ...


1

One personal reason I don't like haptic feedback is that it is noisy. Watch someone type out a message/text with haptic feedback sometime - the noise catches your attention even if you're not the only one typing. Another personal reason is because it eats up my battery time. I found this article really interesting: ...


3

Haptic feedback is provided to inform users that an interaction is taking place. To quote this research article about Haptic feedback on Keyboards Consumers evaluating a standard Android keyboard say they prefer options that employ HD haptic effects compared to the non-haptics and standard haptics alternatives: With HD haptics, a virtual keypad feels ...


1

This is a tough question to answer without really getting deep into your app, but I'll take a crack. Be consistent with primary wayfinding I think Google has done a nice job with the hamburger-becomes-back approach. It still makes me nervous. The "menu" button on mobile (whatever form it takes) is about exposing a higher level of navigation. This is most ...


0

Have you thought about conducting a survey as well? It can be very useful to do it before interviews, because you will be able to reach more people and gather more data. People will provide more honest feedback since there is no pressure and less stress. This data will give you a base for your interviews. Since you already will have some information, in ...


0

Observations Flat UI's a problematic because it's hard to tell which elements are interactive. This is particularly true with visual widgets/gauges, because you are overloading the widget with more than one function: Users see the gauge and assume its purpose is informational, and (rightly) don't think about it having more than one purpose. You have a ...


0

I'm curious about your research design. Your control group should have the identical experience but without the treatment. In other words, the only difference between the 2 groups should be whether or not they receive the recommendations. You are potentially creating a confound by only giving the behavioral questions to the experimental group. Just asking ...


1

It appears that your app's UI follows the Material Design principles. One of the key insights from Google's Material Design is to reduce interaction on a particular screen to a single button, and give it prominence. You need to reduce information displayed on your screen. This is likely to increase the amount of interaction you'll experience from users ...


7

The problem is in having something that looks flat and yet stands out enough to look touchable. To add touchable cues you need to put some kind of border around each independently touchable thing - to separate it from the adjacent touchable thing, and to make the figure stand out from the ground. Google's material design principles provide some ...


-2

How about using bar graph design, will be more intuitive to click and match your theme as well


-1

You can try doing a glass like effect button. Something transparent glossy effect.


2

Here is some advice for you: First, confirm to your client that you respect his/her opinion. Don't argue! Second, clarify with him/her that you create a product for users, not for yourselves. Third, organize usability testing and invite your client to participate. Then, create two prototypes, one the way your client wanted, and other the way you want. ...


0

What's your question exactly? If it's how to represent unregistered users in the app once a conversation has been set up, you can learn from any service that has a representation of unknown users. E.g. what Google Apps does when anonymous people are viewing a document (representing them by "anonymous animals"). Or what this site does with non-registered ...


4

I think this is a good example for asking the question "What does the client need?" vs. "What does the client want?". So if I understand your question correctly, your client wants to present two websites under one address and probably also under one one design. Whether this is a good idea or not is not within the scope of my answer – for now I just try to ...


15

To expand on Tohsters answer, one hamburger menu is already detrimental enough so adding a second one is only going to confuse matters more. If the client cannot be persuaded to follow other avenues then it's probably best to start looking at ways to make the best of a bad situation. (this blog post expands on this ...


0

My two cents: Two hamburger or shall i say two same navigation model is definitely confusing. First of all it takes up precious real estate that to when we are dealing with small screen. Second, navigation is an important aspect and when the user is shown two redundant ways to navigate, she will get confused to which one should be followed. No amount of ...


0

It's kind of hard to have a conversation by yourself :) They can't really have a conversation until there is someone to talk to. Maybe you can "request conversation" and it remains in the "request" state until someone joins - either a user who already has the app joins or someone who gets the email installs the app and joins.


10

This is a terrible idea You're right to be suspicious. One hamburger already sucks... Hamburger menus don't test very well to begin with. Here is Apple's UX lead on the subject, and more articles here and here, but to summarize: They hide links and content from the user instead of presenting the user with direct options. The hamburger icon is ...


1

"What are the advantages/disadvantages of using caps for all words in mobile application design?" Do you mean ALL CAPS ALL THE TIME? Or Capital Case Only For The First Letter? Disadvantages ALL CAPS looks like you're SHOUTING! Bad if there's no semantic reason for this. Can feel like it crowds other elements, especially on mobile where space is at a ...


0

A thing to consider is that "design", when use as a form of communication, should ease the process rather than hider it. For that reason I avoid using all caps from a typographical perspective. As Bobtato mentioned, our brains read by recognizing the overall shape of words. Not necessarily the individual letters. One of the biggest challenges that all caps ...


0

nah, nothing says that you have to design with minimum specific resolution. nowadays, we should design for multi-resolution mobile device, especially android devices. The best way to design is you should prepare your website or apps to be viewed in different screen ratio (like 16:9, 4:3, 3:2, etc) make sure that your app/web layout looks good in any kind ...


0

The list you showed is designed for items that are quickly/easily recognized like the days of the week. Survey questions aren't that type of content. Don't make users scan a list, find the question, read the question in the list, find the corresponding button, check the button's state, tap the button to change its state, check the button's changed state, ...


0

These are all positive actions (like, load, etc.) and this seems to work well. What is the opinion on double-tap for a negative action like cancel something that is in progress? A single tap could be accidental, but double tap seems intentional. Or is a slide to cancel better?


0

Toggle buttons are an interesting alternative to radio buttons and in this particular case it would look very similar to what you have and would take just about the same amount of space. In that respect there would be little difference. One of the differences would be that the toggle button is a bigger target than the radio button. Of course toggle buttons ...


1

Just an idea that might help or give an other perspective. Old conventions are often intuitive until the point where your target audience is to young to remember. Analog clocks work by rotating the wheel, just one wheel. You have to keep turning it until you reached the right time. Intuitive? Most likely, but efficient? Not really. To perhaps make it more ...


2

From a visual point of view, 2 sizes is OK, different sizes for input fields is very confusing, and the same applies if you expect to input 2 characters and have room for 40. The user will wonder if they need to add something else in most cases, so visual hinting plays a role. Of course, like Chris commented, you need to keep in mind that under a certain ...


1

App design is new as a profession so I have borrowed wisdom from a much older profession for getting design perspective: method acting. User stories, psychographics, and personas are very common approaches to the initial/ideation phase of app design. I've found that they are helpful descriptive approaches, but I've found it more powerful to spend time ...


1

I think the following activities can help to expand the perception of every UX professional: Usability testing (as much as you can) Constant research (new studies, trends, recognized blogs, etc) Participating in communities like this! Knowing your app use cases.


3

You're right in not making decisions based upon your own assumption. What you could do is usability testing with actual people. The best test would be conducted with 5-7 (or more) testpersons from the actual targeted audience in an environment they will be using the app or at least in an environment where they are comfortable. If you don't have time to ...


2

If you mean apps to use in your development, yes, there are many commercial and pretty good tools like AppSee, Heatmaps.io and so on. I don't know and I doubt there's anything free other than free trials for those commercial apps. If you mean research, there's a lot scattered around the web. The old and classic mobile UX research by Mozilla is always a good ...


0

Two Words: Different Devices Example: I wear spectacles when you don't. This is like configuring my eyes with glasses to get the same input as yours when looking at the same thing. My eye configuration won't suit you and yours won't suit mine. For the sake of argument, there may be a provision given for configuring the settings of your desktop from mobile ...


2

Also underline. An arrow is probably better in 88% of cases, but if adding an arrow seems to disagree with an UI then underlining is definitely the way to go. If you're going to introduce shopping, even more so. I'm just say saying. (tags don't include <u> ?)


1

I'd just like to provide a slight counterpoint - not quite answering your question (tohster and nightning have done that well), but answering a point behind your question: Carousels are bad UX. See http://shouldiuseacarousel.com/ . It makes the point succinctly and effectively. It references pages such as ...


0

Mobile somewhat blurs what it means to "close" an app. Conceptually, apps are never "closed"; they're just "put away". When you exit to the home screen or switch to another app, the previous app is suspended. It might be kept in memory, or its state might be saved to disk and its process terminated. To the user, in theory, there's no difference, because next ...



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