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-2

i use this style for display a tree and uses a breadcrumb to show my path you can see here AndroidBreadcrumb On github


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If you require exact times, use either text input or a drop-down. If approximate times are acceptable, use a slider. Personally, I'd opt for a dropdown as I think they are faster and less cognitive load, especially with small data sets or easily scannable lists such as sequential numbers.


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It's good practice to have a default value so as to always show feedback without requiring the user to dive deeper. (What that default would be should be researched with users and possibly a become a user-set preference.) With that in mind, the slider version works best. However, sliders can be difficult to precisely control especially using touch. Perhaps ...


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In my current company we design for three breakpoints: Smart Phone, Tablet, and Desktop. You don't have to design for every single screen out there. Taking into account the most common ones should suffice. That said, special circumstances or requirements might require you to do more than that. However, in a consumer app, the three breakpoints cover most of ...


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iOS 8 introduced this new feature in Photo Album where deleted images go to a special folder called "Recently Deleted." This basically covers the concept of Trash for photos. I am not sure if other applications have something similar. I think it's not a bad idea to have this concept implemented in file heavy apps. Things get deleted, either by accident or ...


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Three, usually defined in the project brief. Desktop, tablet, mobile, at 1024px, 768px, and 320px. Not sure what Bootstrap has to do with it.


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What I've been doing professionally is a mobile and desktop design. I will do whatever pages are requested (typically homepage, landing page, and any special pages) Then I will figure out the in-between breakpoints as I develop the site. I find this saves me time to spin the project up, as well as, it addresses the issue that sometimes things "break" at ...


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It's a fuzzy world we live in People seem to take a boolean stance on this problem, where like mostly in UX there aren't hard and fast rules - optimal design depends on context. Hide vs disable Just to bring all to par, the recommendation is to hide a control unless another user action can enable it - no point having something disabled if it will always ...


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What's the argument for disabling? Typically disabled controls are confusing as one then has to figure out why they are disabled in the first place. I'd argue disabled controls should be avoided in general regardless of the device.


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The 5 second test is essentially evaluating the quality and appropriateness of the visual/graphic design. As such, it could really be applied to most any visually designed piece...be it a brochure, desktop web site, or a mobile app.


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I like 5 sec tests but You can't get so much from 5 second test. it is more get OK test type and can be named as guerrilla kind of test. Trustworthy , company domain, service type can be questioned within 5 sec test. Brand engagement and recalling name can also part of this test. It can be also used when you choose an image, logo or icon. 5 sec test can ...


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Regardless of current stats, what direction will they move going forward? Inevitably, mobile use will continue to increase. Therefore, it makes a whole lot of sense to think about mobile first. The other advantage of mobile-first is it makes it that more obvious as to what truly isn't needed in the UI--mobile or desktop.


2

the question is IMO fairly broad, so my answer will probably reflect this First of all, separate applications per platform are not déclassé, they live side by side and the choice for one or the other really is about the purpose & needs of the application + the performance that you want to get, full native app vs. web app will have a huuugeee difference ...


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Mobile phones do not have a huge screen, even phablets! I think it is better to use a 5-point scale or likert from unlikely to very likely for instance. A10-point scale, as i see in the first pic, would be more complicated for users to complete. I use 7 or 5-point scales in ux artifacts like nps for many reasons, being odd scales better than even for ...


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As per Material Guidelines on bidirectionality it should look something like this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups The guiding principle for RTL interfaces is that time moves from right to left. Forward points to the left, backwards points to the right. You should also notice that if you have representation ...


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A very common method of displaying numeric results is a number inside of a circle. You will have seen this with iOS notifications and other web applications. A quick mockup of what it could look like: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Something like this is effective at conveying your meaning because it builds ...


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The first thing that came to mind was the phrase "the lesser of two evils". In developing an application with a UX mindset, it's almost always best to reduce the friction between the user and the interface. In this case, using the link "Get Coupon Here" to link to another page that actually provides the link to the user is introducing this friction, causing ...


2

As mentioned in the answer linked by @DasBeasto, a good solution might be an auto-completing text field. The user only needs to start typing the name of the location, and the text box will start filtering it down. However, this really only works for users who already happen to know where this location is exactly located. If the user is searching for a ...


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For any select list of over a couple dozen options, free-text search with autocomplete support is the only sane option. This is a common pattern seen on real estate sites (Zillow, Redfin, etc) and travel sites (AirBnb, Kayak, any airline, etc.) Kayak shown below. Fred Meyer (big-box retailer) has a 'Select Store' search box to solve this - requesting you ...


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In android there's always the long-press gesture, the swipe in android is mostly used as a direct delete function. Perhaps you should read the guidelines for each platform first as this will explain the expected behaviour a user would have on said platform :-)


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Filling forms is not fun and especially boring when you don't know why you are doing it.. No one likes to talk to databases. Why don't you try something more conversational and human to make the task feel less mechanical. I would try using Whatsapp and let them feel like they are chatting with a Human and not a machine.. (Creating an app that feels like a ...


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Going by the limited information we have, I assume that we are talking about something along the lines of a "planned transaction" form, where there are three actions: Primary Action 1: Authorize will actually cause the transaction to happen Primary Action 2: Reject will prevent the transaction from happening Secondary Action: Cancel will NOT have an ...


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If that's a responsive design, you will probably move the sidebar into a collapsed panel. In such case, tabs or accordion in the rightside content area are actually a better idea than trying to fit them into the sidebar. Consider such flow: User opens sidebar User chooses object Sidebar is automaticaly collapsed User sees the chosen object and already ...


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We always think "Mr" or Mrs" average is using an App. Suppose you were asked to apply accessibility standards to your app based on a few more users that has cognitive challenges or impaired vision...that creates another user Persona that would have to accommodate those demographics and alter potential security risks (when increased time is modified to suit ...


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An option that I like is "Text to myself". On desktop, offer a form to let the user text the link to their own mobile device. (This form would be hidden on mobile, of course.) I've seen this option used effectively on store locator pages, and I think it could work for your scenario, too.


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I have purchased themes and worked on an app before. The issue is themes comes with heavy css and other supporting files. Many of these style we wont be even using in our app still we are forcing the user download all the supporting files. Refactoring this is a hell of a job. Loading all these files in mobile having a slow network is bad experience. So use ...


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The theme itself shouldn't impact performance that much, unless you're using drastically more fancyness (alphatransparency, animated state changes) in the responsive style than in the mobile one. The biggest speed issue you'll have might be image size. This depends on what you're building towards, of course, but a fullscreen mobile photo can get away with ...


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If built correctly, any numerical input field should trigger a numerical keypad on mobile devices - this generally includes a decimal marker reducing the amount of hunting or keyboard switching the user needs to do. With that in mind, I would suggest that you follow the second method but with the following change: any missing decimal places can be added by ...


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Use something like webpagetest to see how much faster. Speed does help online sales I remember hearing at a conference that Walmart found for every 100 ms they shaved off their page load time they saw a 1% increase in online sales. Me personally my thought is to go with the responsive to not alienate tablet users unless the performance difference is night ...


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QR codes are simple data storage devices - You could encode the URL you want to send your users to (for example the URL for your app within the AppStore) and, when they scan the code with their device it will prompt them to accept the navigation command to that URL and they will end up looking at the page you specified. Google Play does offer a more ...


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I prefer option 2 because you have to type less than in 1, and because most of the calculators and numeric input boxes work in that way (technically talking, it is about mental models and affordances governing our interaction). If you type an integer like 15 you might get a 0.15, and that is not what you expected.


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Let me start with your additional requirement How long is 40 Characters? ========================== 0123456789012345678901234567890123456789 ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZABCDEFGHIJKLMN abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmn How long is 90 Characters? ========================== ...


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What you are proposing is an Adaptive Design and yes it safe and commonly used. Examples of popular websites with Adaptive Design include: USA Today Amazon LinkedIn Facebook It can commonly be mixed up with the term Responsive Design. The differences between Adaptive Design and Responsive Design, the following is a good summary from Mozilla: Both ...


-1

This is called "responsive design" and is implemented by many front-end frameworks (foundation, bootstrap etc)


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0. TL;DR Yes, the media queries are matching your purpose. Although I think it would be safer if you wrote the first media query as max-width: 900px and the other one as min-width: 901px. 1. Different devices You will surely need more breakpoints (media queries) in order to accommodate the most part of the mobile/tablet market share. The best way to ...


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This is a pretty simple interface so I only see three options: Leave it as is Move the difficulty to a second screen that appears after the start button is clicked Put the difficulty under the settings menu you have on the footer. Not #2 First of all I want to say I would rule #2 out because there is no need to make the user select their difficulty ...


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Show a popup or may be a fragment on the bottom with seekbar when user selects an item from list item. It should not be part of view pager. Something like this


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I like the current layout. But I would probably ask the user to select the difficulty every time they press a start button


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One more comment: users with motor impairments will find challenging to tap small targets in your app. It has been shown that if you place buttons next to the bezel area (border) it is easier for them to access. Also, try to provide an alternative to pinch gesture (like buttons for zooming in and out), as it is the most difficult thing to do for someone ...


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What's the difference between "more" and "about", really? Sounds to me like they're functionally the same; they take you to a more expanded text. Personally, I'd probably remove the about button and put the reviews button [82 reviews ★★☆] up top next to the product logo. Hm, in fact, I might just remove the 'more' button entirely. Is there a ...



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