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1

How much data (size) are we talking about? And does the data have to stay on the device once it it sent to the server, can it be deleted afterwards? I think an elegant way to handle warning the user that they are running out of space is to leave an os notification where you can let them know that your application will stop working unless data is cleared. ...


3

well there is a site I use quite often which has what you are looking for (if I got your question right) https://www.kitag.com/de/programm/jetzt-im-kino/ it's basically a cardview and scales perfectly for bigger screens i did a short mockup so that you understand what the stuff on the site is relating to hope this helps. download bmml source ...


2

Study: Users Both Mostly Positive And Inconsistent In Reviewing iOS App Store Titles Empatika used sentiment analysis to analyze around 500,000 reviews and see what reviewers were saying about some popular App Store titles, including Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram and more. What they found was that of the reviewers covered in the survey, a massive ...


0

I have tried using columns for a long texts when page was viewed on a wide monitor (over 1000px). It looked good but there were problems when columns were longer than the height of the monitor. Reader have to scroll to read one column to the end and then scroll back up to start reading the next column. This isn't a problem in printed media because the whole ...


0

It should be placed between the lead text and the images. This insures that The user sees it when he/she goes to scroll down, It is in a general non-distracting area of the app, and It is in the centre of the app, where the user will look first.


0

Since this is targeting smartphones only there is really no such thing as peripheral vision. Regardless of where you put the ad it is pretty much going to get in the way of why the user is there in the first place so I would try and empathize with the user and let them know why the ad is there while encouraging without demanding that they click it. If ...


2

First of all, ads should always be placed on peripheral vision, never at the place where a user will directly look. Second, please if possible disable ads when a user views your blog on mobile. Your fill rates might go down on account of poor CTR. Have a look at this award wining blog writer: http://www.matthewwoodward.co.uk/ He has ads placed in ...


0

As you move into multiple media (web to phone) creating transportable content is more and more important. Content management can mean a lot but one is creating content that you can publish to many formats. HTML, CHM, PDF, HTML5, XPS ...... In the Microsoft WPF desktop world there is a format FlowDocument that is a pain to create but presents nicely and ...


0

I've been experimenting with this issue myself lately and found no image to be the best video replacement. Since we already have very few screen estate, background-images can get to distracting. I then put the images between parts of the webpage (it was an one pager) with some kind of parallex effect to still have some images on site. When talking about ...


0

If the content of the video isn't critical to your users and mainly used for "ambience", I would replace it with an image. Giving them the option play a video just seems like it'll add an unnecessary choice of things to do for users. An animated image is really just the same data usage as the video or otherwise less data but poorer quality since they ...


0

I'm going to channel my inner Jakob Nielsen and say do not abuse your users' trust. Do not force them to download images (in this case video) that they didn't ask for. The average user is still on a 28.8 modem or at best 56.6 (um make that 3G or at best 4G LTE) and this will only interfere with your users access to your content. If the user wants it he can ...


0

I wouldn't opt for any of presented options. Two latter fall out of question, because CTA is too far and detached from the action it submits. First option has a doubled CTA, and doubling essential controls confuses users. There is also no need to show "Next": users know when it comes to confirmation, it's a sequence, a wizard of a sort. You cannot jump ...


0

The first one is the best option: easy to reach and the colour makes it very easy to see where the 'save' options are. Option 2 is okay - but someone not as familiar with iOS may not see the button straight away as it isn't quite as obvious as the blocks of blue. Third one is a big no no for me - will take the user too long to find the button/if they can ...


4

StumbleUpon team created a custom messaging campaign that asked users if they wanted to rate the app 5 stars. The message was targeted only to returning users, increasing the likelihood this group had a positive first experience with StumbleUpon’s app and would be more likely to accept the prompt. Satisfied users who were willing to rate the app could opt-in ...


0

I would prefer that since both the desktop and and mobile app are interacting with the same service some of the settings are/should be shared by the same user. No harm is being done by allowing users to modify their mobile settings from the desktop application. Just make sure that everything is clearly labelled. This is 'valid' for all other settings since ...


3

This is more a matter of taste & design than usability. Both 1 and 2 indicate that there is some text hidden. Option 3 doesn't always do that, it just depends on the length of the field and the input. So in terms of usability, I'd scratch that one if I were you. Now, comparing red pill vs blue pill. With the red pill you can still see (and select) the ...


1

I seem to disagree - don't use the third option. If things turn against this design, there is no indication that there might be more text (i.e., when a word nicely ends at the right side - in your case, when the field would have been 5 pixels more narrow). The Red Pill is more innovative (which might or might not fit with your design and target group and ...


1

Take the red pill! It shows that there is more content without cutting of the data in a hard-edge sort of matter. If the rest of your UI is more of a 'metro' design, use the third option.


0

I love your idea, and it is used in other examples as well. (The LDS has a Gospel Library app, with a digital hymn book, that functions in a similar fashion.) But I have a few ideas to add, if they sound decent. This first idea is related to Google's Instant Results. Pretend I'm looking for hymn... #314, let's go with that. What if you made it so when I ...


1

That pattern is a good start, both accessing a hymn by number or via a few words from its title or any of its verses. I would also suggest that include a "favorites list" and maybe something to facilitate pre-service preparation. By that, I mean that prior to a service beginning, a user could enter all of the hymns for the up coming service, then operate ...


1

You could chunk the complexity into a lower limit and an upper limit, and optionally a difference between the two if this is useful. Increasing the lower limit above the upper limit automatically shunts the upper limit along, while decreasing the upper limit below the lower limit automatically shunts the lower limit down. If the user has manually entered a ...


2

You can keep hidden the two input controls, and show them only when the user taps one of the extremes: User should be able to drag extremes, which may also contain the current values.


2

An anti-pattern is much like a regular design pattern in that it is a common solution to a general problem. The difference is that an anti-pattern is bad solution to the problem.


1

A map. It's fast, and I think it is more recognition than recall. Almost every user of technology can locate their country in a map (even if they don't know in which continent is located). Also, grouping things in not strict groups is always a bad idea: Russia is in Europe (most population) and in Asia (most area); Mexico is in North America ...


0

In my opinion, asking a user to sign even on a touch screen device is not a good experience. users cannot gauge the required space and will not be able to see part of their drawing as the fingers occlude the image. the only good way to make a proper signature is using a stylus. Having said that, I do not want you to drop the idea of getting a user's ...


2

Usually I would have thought the fallback for signing with a signature is to enter the name. With that in mind you could simply ask the user to confirm with signature or name, with the default being the signature. Entering the name would be almost as good as a signature in as much as it's getting the user to accept responsibility by putting their name to ...


0

I understand you want to encourage users to sign, and only use the checkbox as a technological fallback. If so, I like option #2 the best. Option #1 could work, but would require excellent copy. Option #3 seems a bit over-complicated, and you're also sort of "giving up" to the lower common denominator. This might get fewer signatures. I think your ...


1

Another option is to use the list view, but provide a add icon for each list entry so user doesnt have to tap on the menu btn. You can tap as many times to increment qty or disable add if only one unit can be added at a time. Have a search icon in toolbar (top or bottom) to search for an item. For new users and even generally i think "list of items" is ...


0

Yes,couldn't agree more . Users like to achieve more thing doing less operations in any field as a matter of fact. But I tried to solve the problem with respect to the requirement , that has been mentioned in the question.


1

Even though you will save space by combining both fields onto a single page, I would be inclined to present each field on it's own screen. The user elects to pay The user is prompted for password - the user enters password The user is prompted for OTP This way each page could have it's own intro text and help links if required. Otherwise you would need ...


1

When they enter all their details and click on pay, show them the password field as well as the OTP field. At the same time you should send the OTP to their mobile. When they click confirm or submit, they should be able to do the transaction. You are reducing the number of clicks. You are doing all operations on a single page. No complexity for the user ...


0

Don't The user wants to give their credit card info and delivery address (if applicable) and nothing else. Ecomms on mobile is already bad enough without these extra steps; think how simple a real-world transaction and then go back to this system and you'll see what I mean. you might find this link useful http://baymard.com/blog/mobile-checkout


0

Regarding the skeuomorphic versions of them used in mobile apps they seem to be referred to as spinners.


5

In aviation this is called a "trim tab" or a "trim wheel": In this context, it is used to adjust control surfaces (commonly the elevator), so that the "hands-off" pitch of the aircraft is maintained at the angle the pilot wants. Another, probably more universally familiar context, are classic hand-held transistor radios: On a hunch, I searched for ...


1

I wouldn't change the interface much between the desktop and mobile. You just need to collapse the desktop version into a single column. So that these options on the desktop Greene Team > Option One (2) > Option Two (3) > Last Option Are then presented like this on mobile Greene Team > Option One (2) > Option Two (3) > Last Option ...


1

The system seems quite complex. Many levels, many users. If you don't need a flat list of all the end nodes (like your design has), I suggest keeping the breadcrumbs. A vertical breadcrumb\drilldown will make it a lot easier to navigate. BTW, I'm guessing that in this product the hierarchical levels are selecteable nodes themselves. Meaning, the user can ...


1

The 10 Usability Heuristics are as close to a 'Bible' as you can get. Visibility of system status: The system should always keep users informed about what is going on, through appropriate feedback within reasonable time. and Help users recognize, diagnose, and recover from errors: Error messages should be expressed in plain language (no codes), ...


1

Yes, it's a normal practice. As you mention with an activity indicator and the option to cancel it'd be okay. A reason for this is because if something goes wrong you want to communicate it to the user as the first step after the "Submit" action. If you introduce more actions "in the middle" of that process, and that action can also have errors, it'll broke ...


0

Yes, you want an activity indicator. Your typical user won't know what's going on behind the scenes and may assume that it froze if there isn't an activity indicator of some kind.


1

I would agree with most of the comments already written, but I'd like to add a little more in case it's useful to you. There are some great articles that suggest you 'delay requiring the user to login until absolutely necessary' (see: http://www.sitepoint.com/improving-apps-onboarding-ux/). Similar to the iTunes store, AirBnB, Quora, and others, try to ...


1

In a way, this is very similar to how online purchases are made. The store, or in this case the municipality, would prefer if the user created an account. In this case the municipality asserts that the user would prefer to create an account but that probably won't be the case as complaints are reactionary and usually preferred to be made anonymously. ...



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