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1

It really depends on a whole lot of factors...the least of which is the complexity of the state you need to preserve. It sounds like in addition to state, you need to store user-entered data. This is not a simple task. So, I'd begin with considering if opening a new tab is TRULY a burden for the users. Tabs are ubiquitous--even on mobile devices. If your ...


1

You'll want to prototype a few solutions (even if just paper), validate with real users and validate the technical solution with an engineer. The information will likely uncover discussions about validation routines, connectivity, client/server trips and compromises about forced constraints and technical feasibility. Be careful not to over-engineer a ...


1

Pretty easy. Put all your content into a single page so that initially the user can just scroll up and down the page to access everything. Now you break down the page into multiple sections by wrapping each section in a DIV. Finally, you hide all but one of these DIVs using CSS display:none, then you use the visible DIV to control the visibility of other ...


1

Draggable objects on mobile devices are object represented with a handle. In iOS apps it is commonly done similar to the Reminders app, with the icon on the right. Instead of the "scroll area" you may consider a "drag area", or better yet a drag icon that only activates the drag feature when pressed and held. The user could scroll without concern and they ...


2

I do not comprehend why zooming is suppressed. The whole purpose of zooming is to read what is on the site. If our eyes cannot read small print we need to zoom to prevent severe eyestrain. If it is suppressed to make sure we see the ads - keep in mind that we will not bother using the site at all if the print is too small. Also, why are so many people ...


1

Can have a variant too with the available JS frameworks and libraries, loading the content is taking negligible ms which helps us change the data in just a wink. With the above speed, we can also go for another variation where more data can be shown to the user without much navigation between the pages and also by using the minimal space available between ...


2

What happens when you select an item? If you are to just show the selected item, you can have a contrasting color in the background. Assuming it is a shopping site, you would want to provide action icons like "Mark as favorite", "Add to cart", etcetera. In this case, no additional styling for the selected item would be required.


2

Add a selection outline with the height of the slider like this: Since the item will never exceed the height of the slider, it should work.


1

Don't make them 'select' it. If I'm asking you for directions to a meeting location and you tell me "It's on Washington St across from the Shell Station." And you tell me "Don't you mean it's on Washington St NEXT to the Shell Station!?", you're being rude. Think of your interactions with people like real conversations. If a waiter is asking you too many ...


4

I will add my 2 cents that I think give a direct answer to your question (btw sorry about my english): Be specific: If you want the user to do something, just tell them. So you could change "Meeting address" for "Search the meeting address and select an option below". Divide and Conquer : Users like to be lazy. You could divide the search input in 3 ...


3

I have designed a typeahead recently with UX in mind, which, I have to admit, was more challenging than I've expected. I couldn't find a single component out there that ticks all the boxes, although some only miss by a little. Anyhow, if I understand the problem correctly, then you should really always have a match selected on the match list, like so: ...


11

I think the simplest solution in this case would be to take the address the user has entered and map it to the closest matching location and let them know so that they are aware of the mapping and can approve or reject the address. Amazon does the same where if they dont find an address, they validate it and show the suggested address and let the user ...


-1

If the user answers "No, thanks", I will not show the dialog and ask again. As from the user's point of view, he already refused to rate the app.


0

By "process" I assume you mean screens/pages that require the user to fill in information? The "Getting Started" setup process for the OS itself is probably as native as you could get (I'm not sure how WP7's setup process is, as that's what you tagged, but WP8 should be what you're looking for). I don't recall it having an indicator, though. When you upgrade ...


0

It comes down to what would need to be trashed, and more specifically about what would need to be retrieved. I would say that based on other responses about the lack of exposure to files and the ambiguity around what would need to be deleted and potentially retrieved that there doesn't seem to be a need for trash can functionality on a mobile device. The use ...


1

I am having kind of the same issue right now and I decided on a approach like this: for bigger screens/desktops for mobile screens I like it nice and lightweight for Mobile.


1

There is nothing saying you shouldn't have a print button on your mobile website, but it is not necessary. The browser the user is visiting your site from has every capability to provide the print functionality the user is looking for. If the user does not see the need to print from their mobile device, they aren't going to care about having that capability. ...


0

First question: Are your users even going to be able to print from their phones and tablets? Do they have reliable access to cloud printers or similar infrastructure? If no (which seems somewhat likely given your next comment about patchy 3G): No - a print button here is superfluous. If yes: Do your users want to be able to print off their phones/tablets? ...


1

This image isn't the best example (I'll try to make a nicer one) but I think if you make each "radio button" in the list into a large selectable item... it should be easy to select and also to read all the details of what you are selecting... e.g. I would just make sure that (however you build it) that only 1 item is selectable and that it is visually ...


-3

But the navigation isn't at the top. iOS 7 Android 4.4


1

Through hierarchy and natural reading habits, we always read things from the top, which is generally where a website's title and menus are. With respect to your question, menu buttons are still at the top, even for many mobile apps, regardless of convenience, but strictly due to hierarchy. Home, settings, etc, you always look for at the top. This is not ...


0

This is a matter of opinion from the user of a site. Have you thought about doing a focus group or a usability testing session with a few users? You could just ask users to look at the page and then watch their habits as they view articles. If the article title is big enough to glance at without having to stop scrolling, then users will probably keep ...


0

This sounds like a good example of how NOT to do user testing. The aim of user testing is not to ask the user what features they like or want directly. The aim is to see if they can carry out a task and, idealy, that task has been tailored during the warm up conversation. All user testing needs a warm up period where you get to know the user, what they do, ...


0

I usually set a very informal environment before the testing begins. Just spend some time learning about the user on a face to face basis. It helps put them at ease and also once the camaraderie is established, I ask them to play around with the prototypes ( if any ) The word play is quite effective as they see it as a game where they can find the ...


0

Basic Rules: Trying things out is what users do. Reading, and following structured instructions on screen is what they don't do !


1

Good question! While I don't have any knowledge about relevant research, I think that having a button stuck to the bottom screen is not the best option. Here is my rationale: Button takes valuable space that could instead be taken by product information. Product information is critical for users to make purchasing decisions. It could be annoying to have ...


3

There are a few ways to allow for exploration in your user testing. When I'm conducting research with a prototype or application, my first task is almost always something along the lines of, "What do you think about what you see here?" It's an open-ended question before we talk about anything else. It helps set the participant at ease. It gives the ...


2

Yes, definitely, playing and discovery can be an important part of a test session. If it's insight you're after, a self-directed task is great for many reasons. Helps the participant to feel at ease. One way I have tried is to have 4 normal tasks, but the very first task is self-directed. Given you have this app in front of you, what are curious about? ...


-1

There are statistics. I usually say that there are 4 key points: Ask at the right moment: people are highly willing to rate you if you ask them right after they do some great achievement. Finish one level, gain some points, etc. Ask the right question: wording is really important. Make your question/answer sound like it's part of the game instead of "Would ...


-1

I highly recommend asking for ratings. But there are a few essential things to consider. As mentioned before, breaking the UX is really terrible. So, there are 4 key points to make your request effective, get a good conversion rate, and get better ratings: Choose the right moment: Ask for rating at a specific moment, for instance when the user just won ...


1

I don't think you need to show your main menu/action bar (all, my meetings and create) in the event detail view. I would instead only show the actions that are relevant to that context (actions that the user can perform on the event they are looking at). Pressing the back button at the top of the event detail view would go back to the event listing, where ...


0

If I'm hitting 'cancel' I don't want to save my changes. There's no need (as far as I can see) to ask them to confirm this. It's clear that the button 'cancels' the operation. If you feel that it is important to have the dialog confirmation, then I'd reconsider some of the terms. Instead of 'cancel' on the main page, I'd suggest 'back' or 'close' ...


1

It depends. If this is an email app and the user is trying to compose a message and navigates back to inbox before sending/saving, the message is automatically saved in the draft for the user. User can come back later and continue where he left off. If you think there is no reason to save the form data as draft, it is better to show a popup confirmation. ...


0

Since you want to do it in the mobile app, it is better not to use the shopping cart style. I attached a pic in the following. This is very easy to use and clear in the design, especially for mobile app. Pulling down to create an item and when you click on the item, it allows you to edit. Hope it helps.


1

As a mobile user, I don't think it is a good idea to have many new windows open when I am going through a process. What if I want to go back and change something, right? I would suggest you make it like a "slide show" form without opening new screens. Apple setting is a good example. On the first form, you can show all the products. You can make it ...


1

You're right in your arrangement of buttons. Top left would typically be the cancel and top right would be the post/save button. Facebook for iOS is a great example of how to handle the navigation away from unsaved changes. They prompt users asking them to delete what they've done or go back and save the changes (post the status). This works better for ...


1

Redirect to the detail page of the item which the user just created/edited. This allows users to immediately check the result of their submission (they can spot spelling mistakes, syntax/formatting problems, etc.). To make them aware that the item is published automatically, show a (temporary) message at the top of the detail page, like Created and ...


1

My suggestion would be to put it in My Items since going by your answer to my question, there will be a lot of items in All Items and it would be easier for the user to find the item he just created in myitems. Also it would be consistent with experience created by similar apps where you can save content from a huge list and while that content might be ...


0

Rather than doing a vertical expansion of items, perhaps try a more layer-based approach could help simplify. Rather than showing a long list of items, you could showcase a "stack" of sorts which allow the user to track where they were while seeing the options relating to their selection. View an example: ...


1

It's a tough one. I agree with you though, this is a necessary feature, especially in a world with such difference between people and ISPs. I'd take inspiration from the recent European Union cookie laws (if you're not familiar: websited must obtain permission before setting cookies or have an easily accessible policy). Most websites now seem to implement ...


3

I can think of 2 arguments not yet mentioned... The issue of apps being "sandboxed" for security makes it irrelevant. It's an outdated metaphor that no longer has meaning in the mobile ecosystem First, sandboxing. For security, each app runs in its own little world and only has access to what the system allows. You wouldn't want some social photo app ...


2

Storage. In desktop, when you delete a file it is not completely deleted from disk. In mobile, when you delete something, you instantly claim the memory back. ex; deleting photos, videos, songs, apps etc. There are 'trash' or 'recycle bin' concept within apps ex: email which in turn stores the deleted emails, drafts in their servers and not actually ...


2

I know this question is old, and the purpose of misleading prices has been covered, but I don't see any explanations about why donations are round amounts. Simply put, taking donations as whole numbers is more convenient for charities. They don't charge taxes or give change, so they list preset donation amounts without fractions of whole numbers (eg, ...


10

While a mobile device does have an internal file system, the software hides this from the user. From a user point of view there is no file system. If there is no files system there are no files. Since there are no files you cannot delete a file. So a recycle bin would simply not have any function.


5

What would you like to put into it? Apps normally have to be "uninstalled", so no use for a bin. Most E-Mail clients already have the recycle bin feature. A pretty large amount if images, videos and other media are synchronized with some web service (or at least the manufacturers want us to do so) so a local delete doesn't delete the backup. It usually ...



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