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There are several reasons for decisions like this: Mobile apps tend to favor simplicity over efficiency. The quick view is a convenience feature that can potentially make the app more confusing/cluttered without helping deliver on the core functionality. Features like the quick view make it faster to use the app, but end up being more confusing for users. ...


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It's hard to say without any mockups, but this sounds like many GPS/map applications. I think people are pretty familiar with the interactions in those applications of moving content around behind static hovering controls.


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The best way i see is to have a "home" button in the navigation in both cases user logged in or logged out, and a multi navigation in a case if the user is logged in. e.g user logged in, will see > home,products,events,news user logged out will see > home, tasks, docs, settings, but this time an arrow direction upwards will appears on the home ...


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I have a product under development with a similar scenario. Logged out, the main navigation items available are: Home About Features Tour Plans Contact Blog Resources Support Jobs Press Sign In However, once signed in, these are replaced with: Home Projects Support Resources Blog Account Sign out There is simply no room to have all public & private ...


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Allowing members, registered users, access to different functions than people who didn't sign up is common, but those are functions that are appended to the normal set of functions. Eliminating functions after log in is a definite no-go! I would suggest to add member functions like tasks, documents and settings to the regular set of functions like ...


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Jakob Nielson describes the 3 time limits which he calls the 'Response-Time Limits': There are 3 main time limits (which are determined by human perceptual abilities) to keep in mind when optimizing web and application performance It is an article written in 1993, but three years ago he published a new research report on website response times ...


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I recall that 2 sec is when some start dropping out nowadays. Of course it depends on the site and the situation. Also it depends on the timing of separate parts of the site. For example, layout, text, and image placeholders might load earlier while images load later. Other stuff can happen in the background. Perceived performance is more important than ...


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A little late to the party but I'm developing a project with a designer who is absolutely in love with modals. For mobile devices in 2014, modals are still a poor UX choice because of positioning and scrolling issues. They are most often JavaScript driven, which means if accessibility is important to your project then there will be a cross section of site ...


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For long forms, portrait is preferred, because: More form is visible in portrait mode than landscape. More fields are visible in portrait mode with on-screen keyboard on. Easy to hold and type while doing data entry. Once we had a similar problem, and after a research, we came to this conclusion that, for bigger data entry forms, using portrait is better ...


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I don't think the user needs an extra link to help close their browser window, as there's already a standard close button that they know how to use. Instead, suggest that they've completed registration, and tell them that they can close the window. And, even better, have a button to go to what they were trying to do before they registered (like commenting ...


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Without knowing the context, I would be more inclined to link someone back to login page or homepage after this type of registration. This way, they could have some options if they haven't received an email/spam etc. However, if you're set on your initial approach I would go with something like: Thank you + check email to activate message. Btn - 'Close ...


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I think also as previous comment. I use vibration for critical cases. E.g. if user cancels the payment or registration process. Think about frequency too. More than needed is always a ux killer.


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I would use the haptic feedback when I would like to notify the user that he made an important action (can be negative or positive). Like deleting something important or adding something important to a list or so.


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Wheat ever you are doing is a right approach. This will be a guided approach. With some small improvements you can enhance the user interaction. A back button with previous page label I see a save button on every page and in the header, doesn't your use case require a save button? if required it should be placed in the page where user has taken a ...


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For a very small amount of detail information, the standard way to display details would be to have a + beside "Interior", which when clicked slides down to display the extra details. For larger amounts of information you will probably want to have an arrow (pointing off screen to indicate another screen is available) beside "interior", which takes you to a ...


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I didn't do a formal study on a contrasting color scheme, the following is what I found over the course of a weekend. During an app contest last year, I created a transit application which used black and white in hopes that it would be easier to see outdoors on a sunny day because of the contrast of colours. Here is a screen shot: Since it was a ...


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You might be asking too much of your users. Or maybe not. First you have to decide if tabs are the right approach. A. Are users going to be switching between them to reference info? B. Or will they more likely choose a path and move on? If A, you're on the right path. If B, you should navigate them to the right area and leave the other "tabs" behind. ...


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For now I have decided to design a Journey based solution for this task. I will be using numbered steps, with a "Step 1 of 9" as the first page focus, accompanied by a flat design progress bar to quickly show the progress along the journey. Each step will be able to use swipes to navigate between the steps, with a button included to jump to top-level ...


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I think that some of this will depend on the content you are actually looking at displaying. For example, if this is something like choosing a country from a list, there are some better ways of handling it (for example) than just a regular dropdown. In general, the better user experience is when the user isn't hidden so much content. This article and this ...


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Thinking of customers' decision points, you could design good checkout process. Decision points are the points, where customer ask question to herself, should she continue or exit the process? So decision points work like funnel. Obviously not all the visitors of the checkout page will purchase the items. But letting funnel to trigger early, allowing the ...


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Intuitive often means well known and usual. It seems like in your case you can place all the suboptions on a single screen and use a dedicated screen for choosing a song from a library with help of a standard settings UI controls and behavior:


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Tabs are often misused. Being metaphoric to real-world file tabs, tabs are content clustering controls. They shouldn't be used as a selection control (replacing buttons or checkboxes). Just to give one example of how things can go wrong, when users switch tabs they expect the tab content to change. Often tabs used as selection controls keep the same panel ...


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Why do they have two possible logins anyways? Just make them sign in once with one id. once they are logged in they will see the view that corresponds to the type of account they have. if they have two accounts, let them switch between them, once they are logged in with their one id. Both your options look exactly the same from an end-user perspective. Tabs ...


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In your case, I would go with tabs, as the switcher look is not as clean, and has a little more cognitive load to make sense of it. The tabs style is the expected treatment in iOS, so go with that.


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It all depends on context. But, in general, if you need a tooltip to explain something, I'd argue that shouldn't be in a tooltip to begin with and should just be a part of the content on the screen by default.


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The first one is the best choice, at it is the most expected location for this type of view. On the other two, I'm looking for the "finish" button and not finding it right away, making me think someone made a boo boo.


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An analogy first: A pig looks different than a horse. They have different uses and characteristics, and seeing them we instantly set our minds to their specific context. A mule and a donkey look similar, but they have very different abilities and uses. If you could make a mule and a donkey from scratch, wouldn't you make them look more different than they ...


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I like option 1 as it is very clear what the user should do, and as you stated it is the only option that fits right in the easy-reach zone for both right- and left-handed users. I often find forms that use option 2 confusing because the CTA isn't where my eyes are when I reach the bottom of the form, so I have to search for it. It's also difficult for ...


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UserTesting now does testing for mobile apps: http://www.usertesting.com/mobile. They send their testers a webcam to provide an overhead view of their device. The disadvantage is that the device has to be flat on a table, or close to it, so you might not see users interact with their devices in quite the same way as they might in real life. Here's a ...


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I think the dual dropdown menus may be a little confusing, since they appear to be conditional or part of the same form action (i.e. selection from first dropdown changes what's available in second dropdown, or any number of other assumptions). Would you consider moving the 3 sub-page links into your mobile navigation? It's very common to see sub-navigation ...


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I saw this tweet yesterday. Where did the now ubiquitous hamburger menu icon ≡ come from? Xerox—already in 1981 http://t.co/1fSOIYDvM4 by @geoffa pic.twitter.com/nWDI8E0ClX— Antti Latva-Koivisto (@anttilk) 30 maart 2014 Although Xerox seems to be the first to use it on computer, there is no definite data (yet) on who used it on the ...


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Most mobile services have implemented infinite scrolling and I haven't heard any complaints about it yet. Rather than having to click and go to a new page to get information, mobile users will prefer scrolling. If your page is too long, implement infinite scrolling where a certain portion of the content loads and when the user scrolls to the end of that ...


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There is an interesting blog article here with a bunch of different links to studies on the topics. Some of this may not be totally up to date, and doesn't just apply to mobile but it's interesting to see the results - for the most part people don't mind scrolling.


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Will the geo data for all users be pulled in a batch every 5 minutes? If so you could probably do away with the (potentially confusing) changing avatars, and simply put something on the top or bottom of the screen advising the user of the time since the last refresh - You might even give the user the ability to 'force' a refresh of the data. If you were ...


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In recent apps I have been trying a bit of a new format for keeping the flow of a user's registration in one piece: User fills in form. As soon as they enter an email address, I validate it and email a confirm code using ajax. Before finishing the registration form, the code must be input. Once they click done on the form, they are registered and verified. ...


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Like other people suggested, it's a very good idea to let user's explore your app before email verification or give up email verification at all. But if you really need email verification, you may use the mobile's capabilities to improve the user experience. Fill in sign up form. Done. (Available features are still restricted.) Your app checks emails in ...


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If you're designing for a mobile phone - and users do not need to compare the content in each section - I'd suggest to close each section as soon as a new one is opened. I justify my approach by considering the limited screen size that users have. If on the contrary, this sections are relative to e.g. Edit user profile - where users are likely to need to ...


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With that said, are there any outstanding reasons to produce a mobile version of a site that is substantially different than the desktop version? Antiquated corporate product management and development processes and out-of-date developer skills and/or technology infrastructure. In many (most?) cases that's what it boils down to. Why do we have two ...


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From my perspective there are two things to consider here: What does the user expect of a website viewed on a mobile device in terms of what he wants to achieve there What does the user epect of a website viewed on a mobile device in terms of performance With regard to 1 I would say you are right, generally one can assume that the goals a user wants to ...


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The standard today is to have one website that responds to the device it is being viewed on. The experience should be tailored for that device. For example, a website being viewed on mobile might respond to use a fly-out side menu, instead of a drop down horizontal menu in the header. Also, mobile sites should have everything the desktop version of the site ...


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Mobile devices have very different UX requirements to desktop/laptop computers. Here are a couple of examples from the top of my head: Touch interfaces need a few-mm gap between links to avoid the fat-finger problem Touch interfaces have no "hover" state Phone interfaces are designed to be read top to bottom If you have multiple layers of menu on a ...


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Since it is a web based application, i would suggest to display small number of data to the user and provide proper filters or search options to the user to find desired data (in your case village name). you can try couple of options here. Option 1: You can provide a text field for village name with search option. user should be able to type 3-4 letters and ...


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Provide functionality to let the user drill down the number of items to choose from. Do this by using properties of the item the user knows about. In your case you could ask in which state the village is in or what the first two postal code digits of the village are.


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Definitely place whatever you're going to on the righthand side - a natural indication for western readers (perhaps do the opposite if localizing for other cultures) that further action can be taken. As for an icon, a small folding map or a pin (of the inverted tear-drop style...but that's just me disliking the skeumorphic example above), would be the way ...


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You answered your own question when you said: It's worth to mention that you can't play around with application while we are doing this. Since that's the case, you need a true modal dialog which let's the user know they can't do anything until the syncing is finished. Therefore, you have to go with Option B.


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Try using a stylized right-pointing triangle just before the text. By "stylized", I mean in keeping with your site's colour scheme, and possibly with a little subtle 3D bevelling on it, depending on context. You can probably find a lot of examples of this kind of subtle link indication around the web; it's not that uncommonly used.


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I have mine fixed to the bottom right of the screen and my customers find it there quite easily. I definitely use a bright color that is different than the rest of the user interface. I would not hide it on any user interface, mobile or otherwise. That will only lead to problems.


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A combined list works well as all the choices can be selected in a single view. However, users may want choose the network to use so I would supplement this by identifying the network each contact will be using. Another thing to be wary of is that the merged lists may be exhaustively long and littered with multiple duplicates (contacts that exist in multiple ...


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As I have seen on most websites, it is located in the top right corner with a different color than your other buttons. By hiding it inside a dropdown or placing it on a hard to find location, you risk the user navigating away from the web page if they don't find it. Most users don't go around looking for things, so one must present them with the best layout ...


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The view cart action is probably the second most important action on the product listing part of the site (The first is "add to bag"). Every single person who wants to use the site for its primary purpose (buying things) needs to click that button. Hiding the interaction behind a drop-down menu is doing a disservice both to the users who want to check out ...



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