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My thoughts Use both descriptors and icons. (Eg the conversation icon) Create a pattern language for you app (inc gestures) There are two ways you can structure IE if it is hierarchical such as you drill from room to conversation or frequency of usage. If if users are more likely/often press the conversation button make this the first button or the first ...


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I agree with the comments mentioning the need to capture frequently used browser functionality but given the controls shown in your mock-up (7-8 items) I think a possible solution could focus on the following: 1. Grouping controls in one location: By doing so you can remove clutter, preserve some room to scale-up if you need to include additional ...


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Do it Breakpoints serve at the pleasure of content Far too many "responsive" sites are designed to fixed breakpoints, and fail to size smoothly for screen widths in between the breakpoints. At best this is brittle responsive design and at worst it's barely responsive at all. Notable offenses include column layouts and images which size OK at fixed ...


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There are two cases here, Users can select items and the cart then groups them to offer discounts / combos as applicable. There are certain predefined combos, with limited variation possible to be selected by the user. Users would be more interested in the items they want to eat and not precisely looking for combos or at times interested in the combos ...


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Probably not Remember that the user's perspective is different from the app developer's perspective. What is the user looking for? I would guess that your users will want to look at the menu and order items they like. This is certainly what they would do at a restaurant. Any configuration would take place after they make the initial selection (eg "do ...


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The solution to this question would ideally be affected depending on the engineering constraints, the size adn scope of the task, and the stage of the product, but it is common to err on the side of simplicity when coming up with a design solution. While fundamentally it isn't confusing for the user to configure options while in cart view, there are limits ...


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Two approaches: Denote the caption better as an interactive element. See nightning's excellent answer on this. Make the entire image clickable (not just the caption). Clicking on the body of the image opens the link, and clicking near the arrows operates the carousel navigation. As an aid to web users, you can play with different hover animations ...


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Consider using an arrow or caret to denote there's deeper content. It's a common enough icon that's used often at the end of a text blurb for Call To Action buttons. It's not ideal, but should translate okay on a carousel title. e.g.


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All of the above answers are great !! This is what I can suggest : Complex Gestures are combination of simpler construction blocks and based on the behaviour of your UI (tablet / app etc). So maybe can I suggest you think about your UI and chart out the entire gestures you have currently and then build the complex ones from the simpler gestures. (Complex ...


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Yes you should. Expert accelerators These so called expert accelerators are truly useful in UX since they allow an interface design that is both minimalistic and clean for new users, yet increase efficiency to expert users. Keyboard shortcuts are a great example for this. Expert accelerators are often 'unseen', meaning you need to delved into this manual ...


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I see no reason why not. Provided the following holds true. No impact on normal user operation This are advance user actions. As such, they may not be easily discoverable to every user. It may not be intended for a normal user to perform those operations. In any case, there should not be any impact on normal operation of the user. The usability and ...


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The problem with percentages is, the numeric value should correspond to something. I mean, if you have say 39%, how is it different from 42%. Is it a significant change? (This puts a pressure on polling logic as well, considering there are 100 steps for each place needs to be synced and notified. This is a technical aspect but may have an effect on ...


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Sigh... The age-old "how do I do clustering on a map correctly" question. Short answer: Clustering doesn't work. There is no such thing as good clustering UX, as clustering is not good UX. The reason is simple: The user is either interested in an area, or a point. He might be interested in the density of an area (population, number of ice cream shops ...


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In this case, the intention to add a contact has already been signalled, and the next logical step would be entering text. I feel the 'stock' approach is best here, have the name field focussed, and the keyboard should be opened up. As Mahijeet says, it is obvious that the user will fill in information.


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This is a common problem with maps. There is a solution called MarkerClustering. You can read more about it on the web. Here are some starting points: https://developers.google.com/maps/articles/toomanymarkers And here is an example of its implementation: http://leaflet.github.io/Leaflet.markercluster/example/marker-clustering-realworld.388.html


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You're already communicating two dimensions of information with your icons: Number of likes Type of icon (question, post) You want to add a third dimension (multiple posts per icon). It's going to be difficult to do this because: Having icons communicate more than 2 dimensions of information is not a good idea. You are going to need some way to ...


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I'm going to assume that you will take care of the entry point to the app, and this question is about displaying the QR codes. The question of how to detect and display a broken screen is much too broad. Observations: High redundancy QR codes are very resilient. The code can still be read with around 30pct of the image occluded. Let's assume you don't ...


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Why not skip the on-screen display of the QR code completely and instead print it out and stick it on the side / back of the screen? There could even be a phone number next to it with "in case screen is brolen please call..". This would even work, if the screen got completely out of order.


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Instead of splitting the QR Code into multiple lower-resolution QR Codes, each containing a portion of the encoded data, consider turning down the error-correction level and then animating the original QR Code. Have it hop around the screen, staying still after each hop just long enough for a watching camera to attempt to read it. If any portion of the ...


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Generally people do not have long sequential forms on a mobile device. However since the mobile is becoming feature rich in all aspects it is natural to expect that from mobile. @tohster has provided exact solution of how wizard can be implemented in mobile. You might want to consider few changes which may free up your real estate further. These are in ...


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Consider yourself to be a very rich man. So rich that there's a fridge attendant in your house whose only role is to open and close the fridge: You come home one day and approach the fridge, saying loudly "Oh, I'm starving". The attendant picks the cue and opens the fridge. At this point you may pick something from inside. Regardless, you perform an ...


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In most cases, dismissing the modal keyboard on a non-modal (or "click outside") tap provides a better user experience. Here's why: Slide-in keyboards are very intrusive. They occupy an enormous amount of the screen, even on tablets, and even if the form isn't occluded by the keyboard, user perceive a physical sense of intrusion when the keyboard shows ...


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Use design prioritization to simplify the layout. The top priorities might be something like: User must know what stage she is on. User must know where she is in the overall process. So a few resulting possibilities are:


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The good news for your marriage is, both of you are correct. It depends on user context. If the reader is "in flow", by which I mean she is reading the messages narrative continuously, then sentences are easier to read because she is already processing left to right, top to bottom. This is particularly true if the list of items is less than the magic ...


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When mobile apps have support for several languages, they typically don't allow the language to be changed in app. This is because the user has already made her choice of language by selecting the phone's operating language in system settings. The apps then use this same setting. Our app works that way as well and we haven't heard any complaints. It seems ...


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In my experience German and English language sites utilize the same layout design. Try to write any program for the international market while also keeping local support such as user timezone, number and date format for the targeted user. Then try to a responsive design (if possible). The company I work with usually tries to test the text with 80% shorter ...


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The one option I have seen the most is websites either the name of the language itself as a link to change it, OR use a flag representation of the country where the language is most prevalent. Examples Text-Implementation: Check out the Tourism Montreal website and you'll see this used in the header above the navigation. Flag Implementation: Since you ...


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I agree that you would want to make the most of available space on your UI. Let me tell you that you are not alone. I have seen applications using the practice you mentioned on Android. I am not sure of other platforms. It has always been annoying at first to operate that interface when the action button is missing on UI, but soon I got used to it. Should ...


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Evil Closet Monkey is right, but I would like to add that even if the GO button is visible, it still is easily overlooked. People expect the keyboard to appear when an input has focus and therefore is meant for that input only. This will not count for all users but there will be users that look up at the app when they are done typing, looking for a button ...


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That wouldn't be advisable. Take a simple interface... ... and now close the keyboard (something many keyboards can do, through a direct button press or other user action)... ... now what? It is not appropriate to allow the user to reach a state where they have to figure out what to do. In the above situation they have to tap back into the search ...


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Mobile UI/UX is certainly a less developed area than Desktop, and faster growing at a faster rate. It's importance cannot be understated. However, the truth is - it depends on you and what you want to do. Are you passionate about Mobile? Is that where you see yourself working? Can you relate to Mobile users over Desktop users? Can you understand the User ...



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