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Mobile UI/UX is certainly a less developed area than Desktop, and faster growing at a faster rate. It's importance cannot be understated. However, the truth is - it depends on you and what you want to do. Are you passionate about Mobile? Is that where you see yourself working? Can you relate to Mobile users over Desktop users? Can you understand the User ...


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I agree: Stop making people confirm passwords, especially from Mobile. Second, yes, display in Plaintext. Some good reading on password security and masking: http://www.nngroup.com/articles/stop-password-masking/ It's time to show most passwords in clear text as users type them. Providing feedback and visualizing the system's status have always ...


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The menu is blank for me when i'm not in mobile mode otherwise i get the hamburger. Anyway - this is a situation where it's ok to not have it always there. Think about the following: the content of the site - you're not a social media site and your most frequent repeat visitors are going to be your own employees. That being said, when the repeat visitor ...


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In relation to your question, I think that the solution two its more right than first solution (maybe the buttons All and None, like landonz said, would be better delete it if it not are necessary or found other solution for that buttons) but it have keep in mind the colors of buttons. There are accessibility guides for use colours in web applications (W3C) ...


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In my opinion the keyboard should be opened. Why have an extra click if the obvious action is that click? Users should be able to perform their actions as quick as possible. But of course consistency is important as well (as stated by VinceCgto). So if you do it on one view you should do it everywhere. See for example the KeyStroke Level Model how certain ...


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Consistency is key here. You wouldn't want to confuse your users by sometimes showing the keyboard and at other times not. I'd go for not showing it immediately as this gives you the benefit of more screen estate, which could very well contain crucial info (both about the field and in general). On a side note, when focused on field, you could provide a ...


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Well it all depends upon UX designer's call. In my opinion if page has only input field(s) then keypad should open automatically as it's oblivious that user will fill information now. So in order to minimize the number of taps on any UI, keypad should open automatically as the screen loads. You can see this working on various online mobile recharge apps. ...


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I see two ways to accomplish what the client wants. One is a pinned, dynamic legend. This will display the values as they click around. This example shows with mouse over updates, but the visual would be the same. Another option would be to use tooltips, but offset the text/value box to accommodate for someone's finger. You could also make the tooltip ...


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There's a comprehensive article here that covers most of what you need: http://scotthurff.com/posts/how-to-design-for-thumbs-in-the-era-of-huge-screens It's based around the iPhone series but most of the information is transferable. Basically it says don't make users over stretch or over flex: for right-handed users, the bottom right-hand corner is ...


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This is an extremely interesting question and one that I have been unable to find any answer to. However, I was able to easily find the following links that may (by reading between the lines) yield some insight: Google's guidelines for developers considering the use of location in their apps ...


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The only responsive industry solution i've met is http://www.samsung.com/nl/consumer/tv-audio-video/televisions/ . With a few adjustments it might even work nicely on the smallest viewports. Just take into account not to use too many products for comparison.


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A common UX pattern for mobile charting is is to allow the user to touch anywhere on the graph and then highlight the data points in line with the principal axis above or below the touch point. Additionally, adding a textual representation of the data isn't a bad idea. For a quick example: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq ...


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I'd say no, as you are already compromised by screensize and content you have to present. Mobile OS seems to understand that by choosing to not implement the scroll bar in their browser. A solution to your problem could be anchors within your content and a scroll script to smooth it out so you won't be dealing with more/other confusion. Hope it helps. Good ...


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Overall the idea shouldn't be a problem but the location of the feedback could be. Imagine if in the future you have this checkbox towards the very bottom of the visible page and the user doesn't know to look in the upper right for a confirmation. My advice would be to present the feedback as close to the action as possible. Something like this could ...


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You basically have a two-level navigation hierarchy. That's not unusual. Let's start with the Mobify approach: The Mobify approach is reasonable if you want to constrain users to a single panel, or if you think users will want to jump around the hierarchy frequently so they won't have the patience for a slide-in animation. It's also useful if you want ...


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You're trying to create what's probably the single most common mobile design pattern, namely drilldown navigation :). You're saying that when you click the arrow, the submenu slides on top of the current one, and from your mockup it appears that the top item leads back to the original menu. In other words, when you click an item, you see the list of the ...


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Sitesearch is an important navigation function of an online store. So, make the search box clear and prominent on the site-wide header. If your product catalog is very large, then allow users to choose the category before they perform the search. Don’t place any other boxes in the header other than the search box as that would confuse the shoppers. Use a ...


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Material design doesn't discourage the use of checkboxes for mobile. The link posted in the question refers to a specific use of checkboxes as a way of selecting items (eg an entire row, or a group of controls, or some text). Checkboxes are not good for that kind of interaction because it confuses the function of the checkbox. There are several reasons ...


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Dont ask them their ethnicity on the signup page! You can remind them later that various aspects of their profile are incomplete (not just their ethnicity.) but if they complete everything except the ethnicity - they're doing it on principle, so stop reminding! If the incomplete sections are in a different colour there would be no need to remind though ...


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Oh no, not this again. Users scroll. I've always had this discussion with people when they ask: "If we hide information underneath the fold, will they know that there is something there?" What is the first thing that people do when they land on a page? They try to discover, and one way they do that is by scrolling. If a user cannot scroll, the page will ...


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The answer to your primary question is: no, you should not force or emulate a scroll bar on mobile devices. Explanation Mobile platforms already have a scroll bar in the interface. However, it becomes visible only when a user is scrolling. If you introduce an element that nobody else is using, you are creating an expectation for users to see this element ...


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Scrollbars provide three real benefits: 1. Scrolling Although this was their initial primary purpose, it was also never the only way to scroll, as users could use page up / page down or spacebar / shift + spacebar. it has largely become obsolete for users with mouse wheels, or some touch scrolling. 2. Position Scrollbars give an indication of where in ...


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Update: Is it legitimate to ask for ethnicity or Race? As all UX answers go: It depends, but there are at least two main areas where asking for ethnicity is absolutely fine: For Medical Reasons: For Obvious medical reasons to assess risk factors for both insurers or as part of doctor patient interactions. For less obvious medical reasons, for example: ...


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Most answers here are "Please don't ask"-answers, so by now you know that inquiring about ethnicity is a very sensitive matter. I won't dig into this. Generalize To my knowledge, there aren't any complete lists. The reason for this is obvious...ahem sensitive, remember? If you are willing to put some time into this, create your own list by doing some ...


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Casting the controversy of "Whether you should ask" aside... to simply answer the question of how/where to position the question of ethnicity so that it does not remain unanswered: Having it on the sign-up page is definitely effective: there's no guarantee that every user will revisit his/her profile and refine. This means that a drop-down will be more ...


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There is no comprehensive list that includes everyone Ethnicity is not always defined formally, and attempts to define formal ethnicities are often lacking. For example, the Lao government has categorized the entire population into 49 official major ethnicities in 160 ethnic groups, and yet there are many who feel that their identity has been neglected. ...


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Where is the best place to ask the user their ethnicity? Honestly -- in the doctors office. Unless the benefit to the user is clear then don't ask for it. You wanting to keep track for your own records isn't clear benefit to the user. If it turns out that a user sees value in telling you their ethnicity (like in a doctor's office due to ethnic ...


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Some opinionated comments. And hopefully part of an answer. I would use a drop-down list and not pre-fill it with anything. Don't accept an empty box, but provide a list choice which is "Prefer not to say" but phrased better. :) Not pre-filling it makes the user at least think about it, so that you don't get the default answer all the time. Be sure to keep ...


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Re: other options & considerations... For dates like airline or hotel reservations (usually later in the current year) I personally prefer the simultaneous ability to enter text or choose from a pop-up calendar. For a web-app there are jQuery plugins that can accomplish this pretty nicely, or just use the native datePicker control, which people ...


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This is very straightforward: you have to use the standard date picker control for each platform as outlined in the appropriate design guide. Here's Android class reference, iOS class reference, and Windows Phone class reference. If you're working on a web app, it's still better to use native date pickers to minimize user confusion and provide a consistent ...


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During my work, I found that most people (including me) like single fields together with a format helper label (_____ DD/MM/YYYY) best. It is easy and fast to type and everyone should get the formatting hint. Plus, it's easy to evaluate and work with afterwards in your program. Bonus: Most mobile devices have the common separators (/,.) present on the ...


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I can only guess, but I think the intention behind this guidance is that Google wants to eliminate the ubiqitious appearance of checkboxes as first column in every table, for (single or multiple) selection. I would agree with the statement that this is an explicit anti-pattern for mobile (while it appears often on desktop designs). As stated, first think ...


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Only having it on the "scan" tab sounds perfectly acceptable & is the way most tab-separated apps work, esp in iOS. Each tab has a distinct associated view for a different mode or sub-task. If the "Scan Options" functionality only makes sense to use inside the "scan" tab then put it there & nowhere else. That said, if you wanted to have a dedicated ...


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To make "Autocorrect" work, there are several key components play here. The prediction algorithms, obviously. The dictionaries being used The perceived necessity vs. "feature-pushing" Why iPhone users "suffer" more ? Mr. Vitaly's answer is quite enlightening. I just want to add my 2-cents. The prediction algorithms: Of course, they are different for ...


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Most users can relate to digital media Sometimes I convert the cost of various items into NetFlix subscriptions to emphasize how much my wife doesn't need that new pair of shoes costing the same as 14 months of NetFlix. Most users are aware of how much media they consume on their phone which is good since this also happens to be the main thing taking up ...


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I advise keeping autocomplete unless you/your users would be concerned about it for security reasons. In general, autocomplete is convenient for users so they don't need to waste time typing their info (especially on mobile).


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Is there any specific reason to disable autocomplete? if not, disabling that would add a 'little' dislike to your site. Username should be enabled for autocompletion, Which is more true for mobile browsing, where typing is still quite challenging except the young users. Consider the major age category of your users. If that's over 25, typing on mobile ...


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Enormous lists work best with a powerful search. As well as searching by name, allow filtering by other parameters if appropriate. On mobile, almost everything is faster than typing. For example, searching with a string of two characters and tapping a filter option is much faster than searching for a longer string (>5 characters). However, the list of ...


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It's not uncommon to release a less than perfect product as long as you plan on fixing the bugs you know about and thoroughly test it. Ensure that these bugs don't hinder the user or they will simply navigate away from your website. If your images are in the wrong place and create issues for navigation then that could be worse than not having a mobile ...


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Android have some guidelines, which may be helpful: http://developer.android.com/design/style/metrics-grids.html They deal mostly with interactive element's spacing, but the margins are applied to text content too.


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This article states that almost all users scroll down even before the page loads completely. Luke Wroblewski being the ambassador for Mobile First, I think it's a good start in this direction.


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They buttons are so close that people could easily click the opposite of what they want. I think it would be beneficial to consider a different paradigm of marking a "pass"? As to your question, apparently 70-95% of people in the world are right handed (source), which makes me think it would be better to have the preferred action near the right side edge ...


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"all of the videos will be less than a minute" That it perfectly fine to be honest. The question you should be asking is who is the target audience, do they have good internet access/bandwidth to actually view the content ? I work for media company with majority users in Japan and Indonesia and we try to serve right content to the right audience.


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"Click here" or related "Action here" have become a bad practice for navigation. In case you want to use a text, I would be better just to specify the action (continue, buy, finish, next, etc). If for some reason you HAVE to describe a "mechanical action", tap / touch are the options. I don't have scientific support for this but here some reasons from: ...


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You can reference Apple design guidelines: Avoid lengthening alert text with descriptions of which button to tap. Ideally, the combination of unambiguous alert text and logical button labels gives people enough information to understand the situation and their choices. If you must provide detailed guidance, follow these guidelines: Be sure to use ...


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AddThis has provided sharing for years, and they are growing with new responsive designs and maturing as a company with new products and analytics. They claim 1.7 billion uniques a month on their about page with 743 million uniques from mobile. While you may not like their Mobile Toolbar that slides up, their 'Original Sharing Buttons' or revised icon ...


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Sharing content is a legitimate use case. Many sites have gone overboard with the idea, to the detriment of their users, but that still doesn't invalidate the use case. When sharing buttons were first added (to websites), a button was typically added for each service. This was fine when there were only a few services, but as the number of sharing buttons ...



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