New answers tagged

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See my mockup below: I would suggest to show the table in an iframe, which will definitely give you a horizontal scrollbar, but will prevent you from losing your point of reference on the page (if you scroll the entire page, you might 'lose' your navigation and layout). If possible, give (power) users extra functionality, such as the ability to reorder ...


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I feel we should do this way (refer the attached image). In this design the dates are highlighted with the respective training. It includes training name and timings. User has all the details at one place with primary content highlighted visually. Attached another screen. Visual credits to Behance - Pouya Ahmadi


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Commenting on @fiscme http://i.stack.imgur.com/Ir9md.png This seems to be a better solution, although in September 2016 and later months the user may need to scroll to check the current and upcoming schedule. This solution may also allow to link each class to a syllabus, if it has already been segmented by date, or other class-related content.


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Looking at all the answers it has shown me that i dont need to remove all duplicate information, just display it better. However I thought that abstracting the month out of it it could make things a little clearer to read as well. So building on previous answers ideas (thanks all) and a couple of my own, i came up with this. Its not the official 'answer' as ...


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Add a U+FE0E VARIATION SELECTOR-15 after each chess piece to force them to render them as text. For reference, U+FE0F VARIATION SELECTOR-16 will force characters to render as emoji. U+270C ✌ U+270C U+FE0E ✌︎ U+270C U+FE0F ✌️ Further reading: Standard Variants on Unicode.org, The Secret Life of Variation Selectors on BabelStone


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Building upon maxathousand’s second mockup and scunliffe’s comment on weekdays, and if research of user needs reveals the preference to focus more on the week-view rather than the specific time of day, a calendar view may provide a quicker at-a-glance assessment. Calendars of several courses could therefore be combined, to help the student better detect ...


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It's typically good practice to put the information that's most important to your user up front in a situation like this. In this case, if you put the repeating times up front you force your users to wade through them to get to the info they care about in each row. So, I would put the dates first followed by the times. I also recommend dropping the leading ...


4

I might lean more towards my left mockup, just for the sake of being explicit. The left one is a bit more explicit with the exact times for the courses, but the right is a bit cleaner (if you think users will notice the message--this could be tested though). I lean towards spelling out the dates when possible to accommodate users who come from different ...


0

This sounds like a classic spreadsheet use. Horizontal scroll is not a bad thing. If something needs to be part of the initial display it should be on the left side of the sheet. If it is less important you can scroll for it. Microsoft Excel and Google Spreadsheets allows some content to always be visible per row by allowing you to pin a certain number of ...


1

Have you considered to just show two columns? One with the values (contact, car no., salesperson, price and a host of other details), the second done with the customer name and values, but place a drop down to select each customer. This approach would preserve the vertical list of features so that you only need to select customers. Adding arrows would allow ...


1

I have a similar situation right now and I did some usability research and found tabular cards is a good and organize way to go. Also when you have too much information is always better to group data in small pieces. users react better to data in Chunks. That's why google material design and most of the modern UI's today are segregated by cards. it also ...


1

Choosing a traditional tabular table, where each cell contains one piece of data, has advantages (easy to compare different rows) and disadvantages (lots of columns take up all your horizontal space). Perhaps consider an alternative layout, e.g. UI cards: Using UI cards comes with other advantages, e.g. they can expand and shrink (i.e. Show more... Show ...


0

Just keep it To the very least, for consistency sake. But also think about this: what if the user has a broken volume control on his/her device? You'd be providing an experience where user has lost the locus of control, which is one of the main things to avoid when designing your UX. The more control, the better, the less control, the worse. Do not worry ...


1

Tabs are making a comeback for their superior user engagement. It's an "out of sight, out of mind" kind of phenomena with users and drawer style controllers.


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Keyword: Intentionality Always let the users express their intentions. In any case, as an UX designer, it's your work to define the possible avenues the user may take. In this case, you can allow this avenue or block it. If you block this path, then the continue anyways message shouldn't exist at all. Instead, simply explain in a very clear way why they ...


1

What is the basis for your restriction? Just think ahead a few months, and the resolution on a good mobile will match the resolution of a bad desktop. Or do you need to have the user seated because your site has really bad news - just kidding. If you say, "Ooops, we didn't expect you to use this feature on a mobile, please excuse bad layout", that'll ...


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I highly recommend not blocking the user from using the site because it's not "optimized". Users will abandon the site in large amounts if you gate them in such a way. It's better to allow them to go to the page and include an information banner or some other noninvasive component than to gate them. That way the user can decide if the page is worthy of their ...


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In Material Design this interaction pattern/component is referred to as a Leave-Behind. See reference here:https://www.google.com/design/spec/components/lists-controls.html#lists-controls-types-of-list-controls Leave-behinds A leave-behind is an informative hint as to what swiping a list item away will do to that item. The leave-behind can ...


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A pure guess based on the limited info in your question: it looks like you're trying to use a dropdown or some other list based selector for this. A more simple side-step to the linear/exponential question may be to offer two dropdowns: one for hours and another for quarter hours. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


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Is “missed the gym yesterday you fat fuck” a good UX experience? When the device has this kind of attitude towards the user I would make sure to put in the terms of service that you are not liable for any mobile devices getting broken :) Isn’t your claim similar to the text found on cigarettes, like “smoking kills”? We have yet to see any desired effects ...


0

"Back" means that you go back to the previous screen. The android back button also serves the same principle. Since your app's back button would bring the user back to the home screen rather than back to the previous screen, I'd call the button differently. Maybe "Done" or "Home".


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(The below answer addresses Question 3 only, as the first two are questions a better fit for StackOverflow) Don't make your users create an account for things that don't need an account. As a user, I shouldn't need an account until I want to do something that extends beyond my device (and maybe not even then). I used to use a ToDo app called Orchestra. ...


3

It's not capitalizing form fields but automatically running sentence case. If you break text with a '.' or start a piece of text in a new field it will automatically capitalize the next letter as it guesses that you've ended one sentence and started the next. In cases where you don't leave a space after the '.' it assumes you're typing a web address and ...


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Yes. It is a pain and iOS is doing it wrong. You should never impose your rules on user. They won't like you and this is the fact that most Android user hate iOS. Sites should definitely allow case sensitive usernames, but you should never assume that all users will have their first character capital. Edit: Here's a good workaround to avoid that - it's ...


0

Firstly, you can't guarantee the position of any physical controls on the device. Even if you decided to stick with the iPhone/iOS you can't be sure that they won't issue a model that has the button you've chosen hidden somewhere awkward or removed altogether. If you have room for an emergency stop button on your screen, make sure it's in one of the ...


1

These are guidelines and no more or less than that. Saying that, the company I worked for have quite a few apps in the app store and we we recently got some of them critiqued by Apple due to wanting to be featured in a particular app store. Out of this, they flagged up many issues regarding UX and also commented on us not using their guidelines as much as ...


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Guidelines are guidelines. If you follow the guidelines, you are leveraging the platform's consistency. This reduces the cognitive load for your users because they already have an innate understanding of how to use your app, and because your app is more likely to feel like it fits along with everything else on their phone. If you choose not to follow ...


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Look at pttrns.com and see how visually rich existing apps already are. You may think of the human interface guidelines as suggestions for what to do when you don't already have a solution in mind. It's one thing to ignore the HIG because of being unfamiliar with it, and another matter entirely of consciously choosing to do something differently than the ...


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This is becoming more and more of a problem as the years go by. Shockingly bad design and decisions persist. Many developers being under 30 do not realise what this does for people with macular degeneration. If people are complaining, yes, you should act, or lawsuits may follow. The standard workaround is to use RDP/VNC to a desktop (real or VM) and browse ...


1

It is a good idea given that a product image alone is sufficient for the user to follow your recommendations. It'll work for cloths but might not be effective for hardware. The latter example will require adding some detail. And the presented design will struggle if you have anything more than a line of extra text below each image. Assuming that image alone ...


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Summary: Carousel control has some drawbacks on mobile. More straightforward solution could work better. Still, A/B test is the best way to evaluate the idea. Some consideration on using carousel control: Interaction style People interact with a mobile in a specific way. You can find some insights in the How Do Users Really Hold Mobile Devices? ...


1

Your top nav bar are prime screen estate and is usually reserved for: Getting your way around Easily accessible commands such as action, cancel, submit, add etc I prefer not to put my log out button at the top right corner. Providing users with an easily accessible log out button is generally not a good idea. You are showing them the "exit" before they ...


4

The other answers have explained (excellently!) the origin of the ellipsis symbol, and how older chat programs displayed typing indicators. However, this doesn't directly answer the question. To my knowledge, the first mobile app use of the "three dots in a bubble" indicator is iMessage. As Samuel pointed out in his comment, this was taken from iChat on the ...


2

I believe the use of the ellipsis in modern messaging apps derives from its use in some Internet chatrooms of the mid-to-late 90s. I can recall myself and others, when in essentially one-on-one conversations with other chatroom patrons, sometimes responding to the other person's statement first with simply "..." and then with an actual sentence. Why did we ...


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The Apple Human Interface Guidelines are 'Guidelines', not 'rules' - you don't have to follow them entirely, design and build what you like.


81

The three dot symbol is called an 'ellipsis' and has been used in text since at least 1588 Originally it signified a pause or tailing off in speech but, in modern times, it also signifies and implied continuance of any textual content. An example of the modern usage might be in webpages where you sometimes find "More after the jump..." meaning that an ...


2

I would think it is based on the ellipsis, which, according to Wikipedia, is a punctuation mark indicating: "[…] an unfinished thought, a leading statement, a slight pause […]". When you see an ellipsis in a sentence, you know the sentence is not (yet) finished. When you are in a written conversation, it seems the best representation of: my sentence is not ...


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MSN Messenger Service How do you feel about the typing indicator—“David is typing”—that appears on your buddy’s screen while you’re composing a message in chat? Does it make you feel self-conscious about how long you’re taking to write a message? Do you hate it when you are multitasking and your erstwhile best friend keeps sending messages like ...


0

I'm not going to say whether a context-dependent side menu is the right choice or not. I feel like that's more a design-dependent question. What I will focus on is the UX standards and practices that might help you make up your mind. Do you have a complete buildout for all the screens your app will show? I feel like doing this will lead to a natural sort of ...


0

On iOS at least, a picker view (technically named UIPickerView) is commonly used for presenting a list and making a selection. This view is typically presented from the bottom of the screen. You can get something like this:


2

If you want to make it available to "dig deeper infinitely through the application", it's really gonna be difficult to use. But if there are only 2 or 3 levels of hierarchies, you can do some indentations. (courtesy of IMDb app) The screenshot here only has two levels, but if you want to go deeper, you could have a sub-level with more indentation. (Just ...


4

Generally, for mobiles, breadcrumbs are not recommended; the back button is what the users are familiar with. Also, it is said that; if your app needs a breadcrumb then your app is not easy to use. Even though, if you really want to introduce one - try what Windows does for the deep hierarchies:


4

Do follow the conventions. I have heard this from many service providers voice answering machines: To go back to main manu, press 0. # is used after dailing the number. Please enter you pass-code and press # * is used for many messaging service like the one you mentioned in your question *123.


9

Just a small extra consideration but I'll make it an answer anyway. I tend to listen to the radio via an app whilst playing casual games so need to be able to choose which app's volume to control. If I had to use the volume control for all apps I wouldn't be able to complete half of my objective (as I want to do both). This goes beyond the other answers that ...


12

TL;DR: An app forcing me to use the global mute would be uninstalled in the blink of an eye. So they better have a mute function if they want to use audio at all. EDIT: The previous was a bit too short for an answer, here's an explanation: Audio is in essence quite intrusive, that is, you can hardly block it out. That's different from vision - you can ...


7

Mobile OSes usually have broad scoped sound controls instead of app specific ones. Android (AOSP) sound volume has three separated controls: one for general effects and notifications, another one for multimedia apps and the last one for alarms. But those are system-wide, so adding sound controls into the app you can control the app specific sound volume ...


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Another consideration is that physical parts can break, especially in cheaper devices. So it's good to have a software alternative on the OS or app level.


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The physical mute and volume buttons affect all other apps too. It's better to have a mute button in your app because as a user I may only want to mute the notifications from your app and not others. For example, there's a chance I want to mute Facebook notifications but not those from Twitter. So for that I'd need a mute button in Facebook because the ...


1

I will add one additional item that the other answers have not hit on is that Blackberry has a multitude of patents covering physical keyboards making it extremely difficult to not infringe on their IP. Here are some examples- Hand-held electronic device with a keyboard optimized for use with the thumbs Ramped-key keyboard for a handheld mobile ...


3

Both (hamburger and nav bar) have advantages and disadvantages that make them suitable in particular contexts. It very much comes down to how much value your users get from functionality that you consider for your main navigation, and more objectively, how often they use that functionality. Spotify is a great example where a nav bar makes a lot of sense: ...



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