New answers tagged

0

Searching around, I can't find any specific reasoning for having it. But the home screen is the continuation of the 'desktop' UI that has been the basis of all UIs since the Xerox Alto. iOS is merely an extension of OS X, so it's fairly natural to keep the desktop concept. It allows the user to have a section of the mobile OS that they can fully ...


0

Is it an app or responsive website? App: Why have Next / Previous icons to select products. The indicators below inform the user there is more to view and to swipe left or right to view the next product while still remaining in the catergory. The area you are using to place the icons would be better used for navigating the app. If the icons go anywhere it ...


1

It has to be either Option 1 or Option 2. Which one depends on what it is that the user sees when tapping on 'previous' or 'next'. If they see another product, then it's Option 1. If the see another category, then it's Option 2. Anything else would create confusion for the user.


1

Postal codes are not unique by country. For example the postal code 50170 appears in 10 different countries. You should ask for the country first, or at least set it as the default based on the user's current location. Also, Ireland doesn't use postal codes outside of Dublin.


0

You have two workflows: one for adding items through scanning and one for removing items through scanning. workflow- usually one needs to scan a bulk of barcodes i.e. supermarket, warehouse, delivery. Therefore it is very important to be fast with less clicks possible. I suggest have a "Scan item" button which opens a scanner view. In the scanner view add ...


0

When I design questionnaires for mobile, I preload all the questions and display one at a time. That way there's no need for scrolling and each question can be large and clearly laid out, but users also don't have to sit through painful page loads. You can do this quite easily with jQuery Mobile's data-role="page" attribute. To prevent data loss in case the ...


0

Just because you're designing for both desktop and mobile doesn't mean the designs should be the same. Interaction that mobile users might be accustomed to might not be apparent to desktop users. For example, white cards with a caret on the right side. To mobile users this is obviously something you can tap on. To desktop users, not as much (especially if ...


1

In order to answer your own question, ask yourself how this UI works and dig deeper into what's being communicated to the user. What does each row do? The rows' function(s) should dictate their appearance. Are they clickable? Do they do something in the same page or link elsewhere? If they are clickable and navigate to a new page, you might want to ...


0

Well it looks like all your important information is available in a clear manner to the user. As for making it less "dull," you could consider using different colors for the text and background. But I don't think there is a problem.


1

Assuming you will be chatting in a window that's over your main ui, 2 things you will need to give the user confidence Show security logos Showing a clear connection that the payment screen is coming as a result of the chat and is clearly a part of the website/app ui. Showing modal boxes or pop ups is a bad idea in my opinion. The better way would be to ...


3

The most important issue is how to give customer confidence that the payment information they provide is protected. From this perspective, chat window is the worst possible option. A person will never feel secure giving out their private data over a chat channel. Even if you say it's absolutely secure. You may add Checkout button to chat window. This button ...


0

The convention on iOS seems to be that if a field is editable, it'll have a disclosure arrow ( > ), and tapping that field slides in a new view where you can enter a new value or select from a list of options (for example, see Settings > General > About). You've already used a disclosure arrow in the Guests section, so I'd suggest just being consistent and ...


0

I faced similar challenge to show good no# of columns on mobile devices. And I managed to produce something like below one.


0

My best solution is to use two full page divs position:absolute to the center of the page. I list down the main categories in the first and when clicked the other div slides in with the further navigations, which can be dynamically changed with jQuery. Use CSS3 transform for all these, and let JS handle the content change, that's it. Accordions make the site ...


0

I can see two places where such a message would be useful/important: On the install screen where you have the overview of your application: Your data is encrypted and sent directly to the other users you have selected. At no point is any of your data stored on our servers. On the "Help > About" dialog (should such a dialog exist in your application). ...


0

I would advise you to place it in the upper left or right corner of the page near the settings button. Try both and see how it looks. It should be positioned on the black background so it is easily spottable. Also, use "+" icon only to support visual processing and save screen space.


0

From your Image, I would recommend placing the Add car button with a small car icon with a + next to it below the "cars" text counter, grouping things together like this makes the user more likely to understand what it is they are doing, either that or under the Gear icon and a clear text option that says "add car" or "add my car". From the above answer I ...


1

My humble thoughts. Align the left side better and add a sort of '+' sign in the top right. Maybe make it subtle though so as to not distract the eye too much?


0

It's to differentiate between messages you don't pay (iMessage) and messages you pay (SMS). To use a gray shade isn't helpful because you will hardly remember "dark gray for what I pay, light gray for what is free" then they had to use colors (green for payed messages, because of color of money?). Received messages are neutral then always black on white. ...


3

My car navigation system (Tom-Tom) asks for city/zip first. This allows the system to filter down auto-complete street names in order to limit typing. I find it very helpful in speeding up the entry, and showing relevant matching street names based on just a few characters. That said, the interface breaks up each step into its own screen. First screen ...


1

This is fairly common in the UK. A form will ask for House number then Postcode then will pre-fill the address fields with the street name/town/county and so on. Or will provide a dropdown of all the addresses in a postcode.


0

A zipcode cannot automatically decipher building number and street address. The best it can figure out is city and state. I would present the address in the following order. Street Address Line 1 Street Address Line 2 Zipcode City State This order is not really out of the world and still helps with the auto-complete without messing up the primary info ...


0

What you have on the y-axis is clear. The x-axis is not clear because there are no units. The dropdown at the top says 'Day, Month', yet it looks like x-axis is showing hours of the day. A few suggestions: I would challenge you to consider the value of assigning specific numeric values to mood. Does each number have real meaning? Assuming the answer is ...


0

Checkout the Rating Scales references at the Usability Body of Knowledge website. One of those, Tullis and Dumas (2009) offers some advice for situations like yours: use word labels for at least the end points of your scale avoid the trap of a bipolar scale (an example is given comparing a bipolar scale from easy to difficult to a scale from "very easy" to ...


0

As other answerers have pointed out, the main disadvantage of asking for the zip/postal code first is it's non-standard. I've seen several applications – I cannot recall which ones – counter this disadvantage by breaking the address entry into two distinct stages. Step one: Step two: By doing this, the user doesn't experience entering the zip first as ...


0

I like the concept of beginning with country or zip code, and it is likely worth an experiment, yet there are some risks. Unless all users will be from the same country there may be users without zip codes. Users may be confused by an unexpected address block layout. Here is an informative article about address form UX design patterns that looks at these and ...


0

I think you've already listed a benefit, which is faster form completion. The average form asking for an address is usually in this order (assuming US address): Street Address 1 Street Address 2 City State ZIP Code This is the normal way mail or packages are addressed, and often times the way a person usually reads or gives out an address verbally. This ...


0

I think in this example a simple responsive(!) table with a fixed header would be the best option. Left column shows the AC model name, right column the running costs. This probably works well as long as you only have one name-value data pair, but it gets worse as soon as you try to add more columns - especially on small screens in portrait mode.


0

For excellent form UX and Ui, take a look at Typeform. We do our own forms internally and we view Typeform as the gold standard. That said, both work. I'd argue that the tagging-look is better because there's a clearer distinction between what is and isn't selected. Checkboxes are also harder to click, and spending the time to build it so selecting the ...


1

Have an area of your UI used to select the "From", and once "From" is set, show the remaining options for "To". Though, you should also allow searching by destination language too for complex use cases*. An entry could be used to let users type a language name in order to filter the options faster. Yes, this is exactly how you book an airplane ticket. And ...


1

I suggest to limit the lists by detecting the languages. Check for special characters, they are the key. This will help to detect "from" or at least limit the options. Then use current browser locale to choose the default "to" language. I believe this should cover 80% of the use cases. The remaining 20% may choose their "from" and "to" languages from ...


2

Here your problem is what will happen when list increase. So short answer make it simple for the developer and for the user. Add 2 drop down (from, to) that will handle if lists go long and even as a developer it's easy to maintain in future. Current UI Users have to search for what they are looking for. If list goes long then it's difficult to ...


2

If the user is likely to use the same dictionary over and over, then put your selector in a prefs pane so they don't have to make that selection every time. They can then simply click or double-tap and see the translation immediately, in whichever dictionary they last chose. (Or in whichever dictionary you set as the default, before they pick one.) (One of ...


33

If a popup confirmation is so uninformative that a user might need to move it out of the way to decide whether to proceed, then the problem is a bad popup, and allowing it to be moved is not solving the core problem. Assuming you really do need a popup that comes before the action and fills the screen, to get an informed response from the user before ...


3

Tap and hold is a hidden functionality. There is nothing on the screen that indicates tap and hold triggers an action. Even if one is aware that "tap and hold" exists, there is nothing that communicates to the user what it does in a particular context. Therefore, if you make something solely accessible through tap and hold, some users will never discover ...


1

since mobile screens are smaller, the screen realestate is more expensive and interaction is different, If you plan the screen properly, and test your app on many devices, you won't need to create a movable modal, the idea is to have all the relevant information for the current step that the user is in, on screen. if you plan on popping up messages, make ...


17

In terms of mobile, A mobile screen does not have the space to fix your problem by moving the popup. You can move the modal window and still not see the information you want to because it has limited space. A popup usually covers the information below by a black overlay so that it stands out. Just moving the popup won't be enough then. You will have to get ...


-2

The worthwhile answer here is: What the heck is a 'menu'? It's not 1950! Recall when software used to have insane numbers of "prefences" and stuff the user could "choose" - choose what font to display your text in! choose what font to display this menu in! choose opening sounds! choose the background color! and so on. That is all ancient history, a ...


1

Based on your current layout and menu, I would also forego the hamburger menu. You have a pretty limited amount of options, with low letter count. I would make the menu collapse from 1 line in to 2: EDMdesigner | API | APP | ECMS | JOBS | BLOG | Login 👤 EDMdesigner Login 👤 API | APP | ECMS | JOBS | BLOG But if you want to use a ...


0

People generally dislike rating or giving feedbacks. Just look at the amount of reviews and ratings for the apps in app store. User would more likely to rate if: a) There is a strong motivation factor, either they really like your product (help them solve a particular problem) or they absolutely hate it; poor UX, high downtime etc b) There is an incentive ...


5

As the developer of Picnic CSS, I have been wondering the same for a long time. I decided on closing it when clicked outside, but in any case, the action should be made obvious. To make it obvious, when the menu is opened, the rest of the content is obscured: A notable example of how not to do it is github. Visit it on your mobile, click on the menu and ...


3

Seems we're all in agreement here. I'll add another perspective on it. Fitts' Law indicates that a larger tap target is easier to hit than a smaller one. So if you can make the entire background a target for closing the menu, then go for it.


15

If you're going to use a hamburger menu, then it should collapse when you click or tap elsewhere (on desktop too, if the menu sticks instead of responds to unhover). Also on mobile other elements should not be activated when tapping off the menu. But I think the correct answer, providing the best UX—which is your real goal, isn't it?—is: don't use a ...


0

I would make the food-items into tags like in WordPress and then have a cloud of frequently eaten items. That way, it makes it easier for the user to add new foods, to enter frequently eaten items, and to delete mistakes. It would also be handy to have the ability to copy yesterday's meals and edit them. Here's a possible popup box for selecting ...


19

Let's evaluate the scenarios Users expect clicking on menu to close If it closes on menu clicking => good Whether it closes touching outside or not=> don't care, because they'll use the button. Moreover most people won't be expecting a toggeable component to remain open when you click outside it and even if someone expect this, redoing the action ...


0

I would suggest a Horizontal RecyclerView with icons for food with name below it. You can also use tick icon to show whether each item was actually had or not; if you are maintaining a Diet with items in it. For example: ...



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