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5

In aviation this is called a "trim tab" or a "trim wheel": In this context, it is used to adjust control surfaces (commonly the elevator), so that the "hands-off" pitch of the aircraft is maintained at the angle the pilot wants. Another, probably more universally familiar context, are classic hand-held transistor radios: On a hunch, I searched for ...


4

StumbleUpon team created a custom messaging campaign that asked users if they wanted to rate the app 5 stars. The message was targeted only to returning users, increasing the likelihood this group had a positive first experience with StumbleUpon’s app and would be more likely to accept the prompt. Satisfied users who were willing to rate the app could opt-in ...


3

This is more a matter of taste & design than usability. Both 1 and 2 indicate that there is some text hidden. Option 3 doesn't always do that, it just depends on the length of the field and the input. So in terms of usability, I'd scratch that one if I were you. Now, comparing red pill vs blue pill. With the red pill you can still see (and select) the ...


3

well there is a site I use quite often which has what you are looking for (if I got your question right) https://www.kitag.com/de/programm/jetzt-im-kino/ it's basically a cardview and scales perfectly for bigger screens i did a short mockup so that you understand what the stuff on the site is relating to hope this helps. download bmml source ...


2

Usually I would have thought the fallback for signing with a signature is to enter the name. With that in mind you could simply ask the user to confirm with signature or name, with the default being the signature. Entering the name would be almost as good as a signature in as much as it's getting the user to accept responsibility by putting their name to ...


2

You can keep hidden the two input controls, and show them only when the user taps one of the extremes: User should be able to drag extremes, which may also contain the current values.


2

An anti-pattern is much like a regular design pattern in that it is a common solution to a general problem. The difference is that an anti-pattern is bad solution to the problem.


2

First of all, ads should always be placed on peripheral vision, never at the place where a user will directly look. Second, please if possible disable ads when a user views your blog on mobile. Your fill rates might go down on account of poor CTR. Have a look at this award wining blog writer: http://www.matthewwoodward.co.uk/ He has ads placed in ...


2

Study: Users Both Mostly Positive And Inconsistent In Reviewing iOS App Store Titles Empatika used sentiment analysis to analyze around 500,000 reviews and see what reviewers were saying about some popular App Store titles, including Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram and more. What they found was that of the reviewers covered in the survey, a massive ...


1

How much data (size) are we talking about? And does the data have to stay on the device once it it sent to the server, can it be deleted afterwards? I think an elegant way to handle warning the user that they are running out of space is to leave an os notification where you can let them know that your application will stop working unless data is cleared. ...


1

I seem to disagree - don't use the third option. If things turn against this design, there is no indication that there might be more text (i.e., when a word nicely ends at the right side - in your case, when the field would have been 5 pixels more narrow). The Red Pill is more innovative (which might or might not fit with your design and target group and ...


1

Take the red pill! It shows that there is more content without cutting of the data in a hard-edge sort of matter. If the rest of your UI is more of a 'metro' design, use the third option.


1

That pattern is a good start, both accessing a hymn by number or via a few words from its title or any of its verses. I would also suggest that include a "favorites list" and maybe something to facilitate pre-service preparation. By that, I mean that prior to a service beginning, a user could enter all of the hymns for the up coming service, then operate ...


1

You could chunk the complexity into a lower limit and an upper limit, and optionally a difference between the two if this is useful. Increasing the lower limit above the upper limit automatically shunts the upper limit along, while decreasing the upper limit below the lower limit automatically shunts the lower limit down. If the user has manually entered a ...


1

A map. It's fast, and I think it is more recognition than recall. Almost every user of technology can locate their country in a map (even if they don't know in which continent is located). Also, grouping things in not strict groups is always a bad idea: Russia is in Europe (most population) and in Asia (most area); Mexico is in North America ...


1

Even though you will save space by combining both fields onto a single page, I would be inclined to present each field on it's own screen. The user elects to pay The user is prompted for password - the user enters password The user is prompted for OTP This way each page could have it's own intro text and help links if required. Otherwise you would need ...


1

When they enter all their details and click on pay, show them the password field as well as the OTP field. At the same time you should send the OTP to their mobile. When they click confirm or submit, they should be able to do the transaction. You are reducing the number of clicks. You are doing all operations on a single page. No complexity for the user ...


1

I wouldn't change the interface much between the desktop and mobile. You just need to collapse the desktop version into a single column. So that these options on the desktop Greene Team > Option One (2) > Option Two (3) > Last Option Are then presented like this on mobile Greene Team > Option One (2) > Option Two (3) > Last Option ...


1

The system seems quite complex. Many levels, many users. If you don't need a flat list of all the end nodes (like your design has), I suggest keeping the breadcrumbs. A vertical breadcrumb\drilldown will make it a lot easier to navigate. BTW, I'm guessing that in this product the hierarchical levels are selecteable nodes themselves. Meaning, the user can ...


1

The 10 Usability Heuristics are as close to a 'Bible' as you can get. Visibility of system status: The system should always keep users informed about what is going on, through appropriate feedback within reasonable time. and Help users recognize, diagnose, and recover from errors: Error messages should be expressed in plain language (no codes), ...


1

Yes, it's a normal practice. As you mention with an activity indicator and the option to cancel it'd be okay. A reason for this is because if something goes wrong you want to communicate it to the user as the first step after the "Submit" action. If you introduce more actions "in the middle" of that process, and that action can also have errors, it'll broke ...


1

Another option is to use the list view, but provide a add icon for each list entry so user doesnt have to tap on the menu btn. You can tap as many times to increment qty or disable add if only one unit can be added at a time. Have a search icon in toolbar (top or bottom) to search for an item. For new users and even generally i think "list of items" is ...



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