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7

It's tempting to say that because we're not used to it, it must not be a good experience. I think we mean that change is necessarily a good experience... it's not comfortable, but the end result may actually be better than what we had before. We are used to toolbars, but how often do we get lost in menus or confused by a row of buttons? The single floating ...


5

In aviation this is called a "trim tab" or a "trim wheel": In this context, it is used to adjust control surfaces (commonly the elevator), so that the "hands-off" pitch of the aircraft is maintained at the angle the pilot wants. Another, probably more universally familiar context, are classic hand-held transistor radios: On a hunch, I searched for ...


5

The good: Fitt's Law: The bad: The biggest flaw in Google's Material design resides in feedback when you press a button. In the physical world a pressed button recedes into the background; in Google's Lollipop the opposite happens, when you press a button, it floats, which is contrary to what the user is accostumed to.


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I would say there there is just as much change of a user missing a poorly sign-posted rollover on desktop as mobile. I use a + symbol to indicate more in these instances, and sometimes where there is a series of rollovers containing more info, I have the first one open by default to show the user what's there. Generally I really don't think we should be ...


2

Provide a default action and update to the user's preference from there. The least amount of information required is an e-mail, so just let them enter that inline with the rest of the complaint/concern form. The user can now just enter an e-mail, enter their complaint and hit submit. Quick and easy. download bmml source – Wireframes created ...


2

It's hard to say one way or the other. We can list pros and cons and offer opinions but at the end of the day, it's going to be heavily opinion based. All that said, do be careful of judging screen shots. A big hurdle we in UX have to face is feedback coming to us based on static documentation...wireframes, mockups, screen shots, etc. None of these provide ...


1

Even though you will save space by combining both fields onto a single page, I would be inclined to present each field on it's own screen. The user elects to pay The user is prompted for password - the user enters password The user is prompted for OTP This way each page could have it's own intro text and help links if required. Otherwise you would need ...


1

When they enter all their details and click on pay, show them the password field as well as the OTP field. At the same time you should send the OTP to their mobile. When they click confirm or submit, they should be able to do the transaction. You are reducing the number of clicks. You are doing all operations on a single page. No complexity for the user ...


1

In some cases I could see it blending in with whatever's behind it, which would be a bad thing. People who are left-handed could still potentially have to change how they're holding their device in order to press the button since it may be out-of-reach, depending on how far they can reach with their thumb.


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I wouldn't change the interface much between the desktop and mobile. You just need to collapse the desktop version into a single column. So that these options on the desktop Greene Team > Option One (2) > Option Two (3) > Last Option Are then presented like this on mobile Greene Team > Option One (2) > Option Two (3) > Last Option ...


1

The system seems quite complex. Many levels, many users. If you don't need a flat list of all the end nodes (like your design has), I suggest keeping the breadcrumbs. A vertical breadcrumb\drilldown will make it a lot easier to navigate. BTW, I'm guessing that in this product the hierarchical levels are selecteable nodes themselves. Meaning, the user can ...


1

The 10 Usability Heuristics are as close to a 'Bible' as you can get. Visibility of system status: The system should always keep users informed about what is going on, through appropriate feedback within reasonable time. and Help users recognize, diagnose, and recover from errors: Error messages should be expressed in plain language (no codes), ...


1

Yes, it's a normal practice. As you mention with an activity indicator and the option to cancel it'd be okay. A reason for this is because if something goes wrong you want to communicate it to the user as the first step after the "Submit" action. If you introduce more actions "in the middle" of that process, and that action can also have errors, it'll broke ...


1

I would agree with most of the comments already written, but I'd like to add a little more in case it's useful to you. There are some great articles that suggest you 'delay requiring the user to login until absolutely necessary' (see: http://www.sitepoint.com/improving-apps-onboarding-ux/). Similar to the iTunes store, AirBnB, Quora, and others, try to ...


1

In a way, this is very similar to how online purchases are made. The store, or in this case the municipality, would prefer if the user created an account. In this case the municipality asserts that the user would prefer to create an account but that probably won't be the case as complaints are reactionary and usually preferred to be made anonymously. ...


1

There isn't really a need to change the look of the icon, as users experienced with "hamburger" menus know that most of them close the same way that they are opened: by pushing the hamburger button. However, if you really want to change the button icon to help improve the user experience by providing more information to the user, then why not change the ...


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I will first leave this article, taken from WWDC 2014, which discusses Apple's attitude on using hamburger menus: http://blog.manbolo.com/2014/06/30/apple-on-hamburger-menus Here is another article that actually discusses user engagement in a real application that switched to a drawer (aka: hamburger menu) and then promptly switched back when they realized ...


1

Well, there's a couple of ways you could go. An obvious one, just leaving out some less important columns when scaling down Flip scroll. When scaling down, the headers at the top 'flip' to the left and allow the table to be scolled horizontally. Important note, the header labels stay in place. It looks something like this: I've used this method before ...


1

I'm not sure if you can control that the site is opened in a webview under other apps (I don't think so). There is no way to deal with it, some apps open the sites in-app, some others do it in the browser (safari). You can't do anything about it. Maybe the best way to deal with it is basically avoid fixed headers in mobile webs, so you will have only one ...


1

A couple of solutions may help you here but it depends on the level of control you have over the user flow between the app providing the key and your app receiving it. QR Codes If the user is getting an API key from a service in a desktop browser to passing this to your mobile app you could consider implementing QR codes in the desktop view and a reader ...


1

Object-oriented actions In all examples of Material Design that implement the floating action button, we've seen an object-oriented concept at play within apps: Email (Inbox) Document (Docs/Drive) News (Newsstand) Direction (Maps) Arguably the concept of a singular most important action creates a nicely hierarchy of user actions surrounding the key ...


1

At first glance, this appears to be similar to having a carousel within a browser window. This pattern works well for browsing a series of items. There are in-page indicators of scrolling progress and the UI is arranged in a way that delineates between window-level and component-level scrolling. In other words make sure your target areas are designed to ...


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disclaimer: I am a developer, with personal interest for UI and UX. So my main competencies are on the dev side: feel free to comment and let me know if something I say is questionable. What kind of style you want your UI to have? Using rounded corners VS square corners have IMO more implication than just solving the "blend with background" issue, I'm ...


1

Great question. This won't be a definitive answer by any means, but here are a few key things I would keep in mind. Note that some of what I'm about to say has already been covered very well in the following two articles: How Should Your Mobile and Desktop Sites Differ? Your Content, Now Mobile Which information should be left on the map? Short answer: ...


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As a phone is an "smart" device I would expect that there would be a better UX than mapping a static paper/digital map into phone format. I would approach design from a goal driven point of view e.g. A fire escape plan has key information if there is fire, but this information is just ancillary. The goal is to get out of building safely and as quickly as ...



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