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52

Some facts: The image below is from the article How Do Users Really Hold Mobile Devices?. You can find plenty of other articles on the web about how users use a mobile phone. The data was collected by observing thousands of mobile phone owners remotely. Dark Orange / Red - percentage of people who use their phone using thumb alone Violet - Percentage of ...


32

If a popup confirmation is so uninformative that a user might need to move it out of the way to decide whether to proceed, then the problem is a bad popup, and allowing it to be moved is not solving the core problem. Assuming you really do need a popup that comes before the action and fills the screen, to get an informed response from the user before ...


19

Let's evaluate the scenarios Users expect clicking on menu to close If it closes on menu clicking => good Whether it closes touching outside or not=> don't care, because they'll use the button. Moreover most people won't be expecting a toggeable component to remain open when you click outside it and even if someone expect this, redoing the action ...


17

In terms of mobile, A mobile screen does not have the space to fix your problem by moving the popup. You can move the modal window and still not see the information you want to because it has limited space. A popup usually covers the information below by a black overlay so that it stands out. Just moving the popup won't be enough then. You will have to get ...


15

If you're going to use a hamburger menu, then it should collapse when you click or tap elsewhere (on desktop too, if the menu sticks instead of responds to unhover). Also on mobile other elements should not be activated when tapping off the menu. But I think the correct answer, providing the best UX—which is your real goal, isn't it?—is: don't use a ...


8

The hamburger "menu" belongs to the menu class of UI patterns. therefor if you look how menus behave, they close in both instances when the user clicks/touches it again or somewhere outside its hit area. The same would apply to hamburger menus as well.


5

As the developer of Picnic CSS, I have been wondering the same for a long time. I decided on closing it when clicked outside, but in any case, the action should be made obvious. To make it obvious, when the menu is opened, the rest of the content is obscured: A notable example of how not to do it is github. Visit it on your mobile, click on the menu and ...


3

Tap and hold is a hidden functionality. There is nothing on the screen that indicates tap and hold triggers an action. Even if one is aware that "tap and hold" exists, there is nothing that communicates to the user what it does in a particular context. Therefore, if you make something solely accessible through tap and hold, some users will never discover ...


3

The most important issue is how to give customer confidence that the payment information they provide is protected. From this perspective, chat window is the worst possible option. A person will never feel secure giving out their private data over a chat channel. Even if you say it's absolutely secure. You may add Checkout button to chat window. This button ...


3

Seems we're all in agreement here. I'll add another perspective on it. Fitts' Law indicates that a larger tap target is easier to hit than a smaller one. So if you can make the entire background a target for closing the menu, then go for it.


3

My car navigation system (Tom-Tom) asks for city/zip first. This allows the system to filter down auto-complete street names in order to limit typing. I find it very helpful in speeding up the entry, and showing relevant matching street names based on just a few characters. That said, the interface breaks up each step into its own screen. First screen ...


2

Here your problem is what will happen when list increase. So short answer make it simple for the developer and for the user. Add 2 drop down (from, to) that will handle if lists go long and even as a developer it's easy to maintain in future. Current UI Users have to search for what they are looking for. If list goes long then it's difficult to ...


2

If the user is likely to use the same dictionary over and over, then put your selector in a prefs pane so they don't have to make that selection every time. They can then simply click or double-tap and see the translation immediately, in whichever dictionary they last chose. (Or in whichever dictionary you set as the default, before they pick one.) (One of ...


1

In order to answer your own question, ask yourself how this UI works and dig deeper into what's being communicated to the user. What does each row do? The rows' function(s) should dictate their appearance. Are they clickable? Do they do something in the same page or link elsewhere? If they are clickable and navigate to a new page, you might want to ...


1

Assuming you will be chatting in a window that's over your main ui, 2 things you will need to give the user confidence Show security logos Showing a clear connection that the payment screen is coming as a result of the chat and is clearly a part of the website/app ui. Showing modal boxes or pop ups is a bad idea in my opinion. The better way would be to ...


1

My humble thoughts. Align the left side better and add a sort of '+' sign in the top right. Maybe make it subtle though so as to not distract the eye too much?


1

This is fairly common in the UK. A form will ask for House number then Postcode then will pre-fill the address fields with the street name/town/county and so on. Or will provide a dropdown of all the addresses in a postcode.


1

Have an area of your UI used to select the "From", and once "From" is set, show the remaining options for "To". Though, you should also allow searching by destination language too for complex use cases*. An entry could be used to let users type a language name in order to filter the options faster. Yes, this is exactly how you book an airplane ticket. And ...


1

I suggest to limit the lists by detecting the languages. Check for special characters, they are the key. This will help to detect "from" or at least limit the options. Then use current browser locale to choose the default "to" language. I believe this should cover 80% of the use cases. The remaining 20% may choose their "from" and "to" languages from ...


1

since mobile screens are smaller, the screen realestate is more expensive and interaction is different, If you plan the screen properly, and test your app on many devices, you won't need to create a movable modal, the idea is to have all the relevant information for the current step that the user is in, on screen. if you plan on popping up messages, make ...


1

Based on your current layout and menu, I would also forego the hamburger menu. You have a pretty limited amount of options, with low letter count. I would make the menu collapse from 1 line in to 2: EDMdesigner | API | APP | ECMS | JOBS | BLOG | Login 👤 EDMdesigner Login 👤 API | APP | ECMS | JOBS | BLOG But if you want to use a ...



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