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3

I'd combine a push notification with an in-app confirmation option. For example, if you want everyone to confirm within 6 hours before the meeting, you can send a push notification to everyone who opted in for the meeting 6 hours before the start time of the meeting. If a user clicks the notification, they are taken to the app where the top confirmation ...


3

Interesting question. It depends on the maturity of your users. The scrollbar is good option to give your users a hint about the amount of content that is remaining to be viewed. By the size of the scroller handle. Showing it persistently need not be the case. As the user is interested in the content. This can appear when the user is swiping from left to ...


3

The reason to do personas is to understand which kind of user groups you have, how they are different one from another, because this may affect your design decisions. For example, you can have frequent users and those who use app rarely, you can have accountants and just individuals you can have those who use the app for personal use and those who use for ...


2

This is the pivotal question. Are the dropdown "filters" important controls where majority of the users will select one or more options before clicking "Apply"? If these dropdown items are important You would want the user to scroll pass the dropdown list to confirm they have selected the correct options before hitting "Apply". If these dropdown ...


2

I personally like something like the following (the key is small and with sort of a fading arrow) that can be found on this persons site on android arsenal I think the key is something that indicates that one can pull down which is symbolized by a downward arrow and a dotted tail or sort of a fading pattern. The tab around it is a nice touch but i am not ...


2

Think about the user's tasks. They're using the app for a particular purpose, working toward certain goals. Ads are, therefore, distractions or hurdles in the way of reaching those goals. You might also be interested in reading about Banner Blindness.


2

This sounds like an example of progressive disclosure in interaction design for mobile.


2

First of all, congrats on asking a very good question and explaining the usability issues in such detailed and logic way. As for your question itself, I think you're perceiving issues with space, element placement and gestures, so here's my take on your problem: 1. Re-arrange Container Elements I'd do this to save space for all other elements while ...


1

I would say use one screen per address entry at a time. I've found it's easier to use an app if we present the screens as per the process flow in the mind of user and one thing at a time works better on mobile screens in such cases (I work in a logistics company). Also, I understand there will be time selection for both pick-up and delivery which you can ...


1

Are you stuck on dropdowns, or are you open to other alternatives? You could lay it out as shown below, scroll vertically through filters if they don't all fit (similar to Instagram filters), and then show options for each filter below. Using this approach, the "Apply" button would not be pushed off screen until a filter is selected, so at least the user ...


1

How many is the wrong question. Personas are a way to pull together your research that helps you understand your users, and put it together into a form that helps you make design decisions. You mention that you're afraid of losing essential needs - do you have enough data to know what the essential needs are? If not, it's time to do more research! When ...


1

I think the faded item will clearly say "there's more stuff over here", and the way you get to items partially off the screen is, by standard, the swipe. The scrollbar would be useful to show how many items are off-screen (one screenful? a dozen?) and where you are in the horizontal list, but that's clearly a secondary need.


1

If I was a user and had that layout in front of me, I would try to swipe using the images first, and if that failed I would try to use the scroll bar to scroll along. I do, however, consider myself an advanced user of technology. Having both options will let more advanced users or those who use touch devices primarily use the swipe action, and the scroll ...


1

As you've discovered, the iOS Human Interface Guidelines document (or HIG) makes no mention of an accordion, however they do refer to the UITableView. This StackOverflow question gets the credit for that. There are also other accordion solutions, such as this one on YouTube. But I think your question isn't "How do I do this" but "Is it OK to do this?" That ...


1

Some good ideas here already, but in case you decide to go with the single list, you could add a filter button at the top (could also be a checkbox):


1

I think there is a great reason to use the single list with two sections. The user doesn't have to switch screens to view the alternative blutooth devices, and are more likely to want to use the ones that are on in the first place. Even with the scrolling, it seems less complicated. People seem like they would be less likely to try to access something that's ...


1

since you tagged your own question with the Material Design tag, I'd suggest using actions that fires bottom sheets for each of your alternatives. This way, you could clearly display both options on same page, providing the user with simple and direct access and displaying the alternative paths an user can follow on a single screen. This being said, tabs ...


1

I would have your design follow the path/user story you describe- you said users want to see devices in range, or they want to request permission to connect to a new device. I would have a single screen/tab- the left screen is visible at first, but a button or clickable hyperlink at the bottom that says "Or request access to new device". That would open the ...


1

Number pickers like the one you have shown are only really useful when there is a small set of numbers to choose from, and ideally you wont have to move to many to get the correct input. The only thing that pops in my mind is to use it for time, such as a timer or alarm. While this particualar example is done with a spinner (iOS Alarm) it could easily and ...


1

I see it called an "Animated Sticky Header/Footer" or an "Animated Resizing Header/Footer." A "sticky header/footer" by itself remains in place regardless of scrolling. If it changes shape when scrolled past a certain point, it's "animated" or "resizing." The top-most header elements in a site (the title, logo, nav, etc) are initially displayed within a ...


1

I doubt if there's a specific name for this pattern. As far as iOS is concerned, it was achieved using the viewport meta tag known as minimal-ui. The minimal-ui viewport was supported till iOS 7.1 and was removed in iOS 8. Although, the minimal-ui is not gone. It still works when you scroll down.


1

A message close to the header and an option to retry. Slack handles this pretty well.


1

Google docs has something like this - off of the top of my head I think it says something like "Your changes will be synchronised when you are next online." I think you've managed to come up with a great solution with your alert - I would have suggested an alert (not necessarily in any alarming colours) that appears either when the app is started (if no ...


1

Yesterday I was using the Spotify mobile app, and I had this offline feedback : translation "Your are offline. The page "Parcourir" requires connexion. Connect and retry." (sorry guys for my terrible English, but I do my best) So, it's not exactly the kind of solution I'm looking for, but this, and all people answered me here on ux.stackexchange, helped ...


1

Be as obvious and explicit as possible. Near the top have show the online/offline status. It's a relatively important status, so make it stand out (but no need to take up too much space): download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups or download bmml source The "More info" link will bring up a popup with text: When ...


1

Here's some examples from our good friends at Facebook and Gmail. Personally I like the facebook approach, but it's really just preference.


1

Web designers can accommodate for font boosting by using relative CSS units. So instead of setting a button's height as 20 pixels, you set it as twice the height of the font. That way the relevant parts of your UI will scale when font size changes. However, many websites don't bother, as responsive design is more complex and the number of users with old ...


1

Your current design looks solid. I think the placement of the set duration works, but if you're incorporating a time stamp as well, you will need to differentiate them to avoid confusion. Maybe something like so: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Disclaimer: I was limited in icon selection by the mockup software. ...


1

Tabs may take up more real estate, but many apps have been using a pattern that while scrolling down the page, the tabs (or any subheader/button-bar) will slide up behind the main header. A simple scroll towards the top of the page will reveal the tabs. This still allows the user to know where they are within the app, but will give a thumb's worth more of ...



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