Hot answers tagged

109

It is necessary if you have different versions of the website for Desktop and Mobile. For example, a lot of websites scrap out features that might get too complicated to be operated on Mobile. For example, Facebook's Mobile version does not feature all of its settings. It is also possible that a large tablet which can process a webpage faster like a ...


58

Personally, I think such an option is essential. For two reasons: Users might be accustomed to the desktop interface. For example, a user that is used to access the website through a desktop can have a really hard time finding the controls he is accustomed to in the mobile version. This is bad if the user wants to use the mobile version just once (e.g. ...


20

Primary Reasons for Desktop site's necessity can be summarized in 3 bullet points: Compatibility Issues Providing Limited Working Features (while still working on full feature roll out) Redirecting for alternative Rich Experience The trend came about with the advent and early popularity stage of mobile sites ~10-12 years ago, because most mobile sites ...


18

I turn my phone sideways and it has higher resolution than my desktop. When you optimize for 320x480, and a tiny device comes along with over 2500x1400, there are going to be issues. The mobile version of most sites almost invariably is the worst UX. (--Worst UX for me, personally. I mean, obviously there are people who like the mobile versions, which is ...


10

Well sometimes the mobile version of the site lacks content that is only available in the desktop version. This is often done to save bandwith (lower quality of images or exclude some elements completely) and eliminate visual clutter. Users might want to see that content from their mobile devices, so providing an link to the desktop or full site is suggested....


8

Steve Krug's opinion In Don't Make Me Think, Revisited, Chapter 10 deals with mobile usability. Steve Krugg states the following (emphasis mine): Always provide a link to the "full" Web site. No matter how fabulous and complete your mobile site is, you do need to give users the option of viewing the non-mobile version, especially if it has features and ...


6

Any Size Now that I have your attention, this might be a blunt statement, but it's intrinsically correct. Whenever you make an user download a file, you need to warn about the possible consequences. As you know, mobile downloads are a beast of its own, and they have rules that don't apply to desktop. They're also affected by: Speed Data Transfer Device'...


6

IMHO, it depends on the origin (bookmarks by you, or comments by users?) and quantity of markers, as well as amount of text (within the markers) and length of video. Think about how these variables influence one another. I see you already adopted soundcloud's pattern for comments on a timeline—which is beautiful—but it's clearly more appropriate for ...


5

I'm assuming this is a Direct Primary Action similar to Instagram's New Photo button. Is it annoying? No. Is it confusing? Hell yes. Reasons that it is confusing: The button is floating. If you want to have a Floating Action Button, you could use the Android Design Support Library and use the FAB itself without any text needed. On Android, it looks like ...


4

I might lean more towards my left mockup, just for the sake of being explicit. The left one is a bit more explicit with the exact times for the courses, but the right is a bit cleaner (if you think users will notice the message--this could be tested though). I lean towards spelling out the dates when possible to accommodate users who come from different ...


4

Assuming that you are targeting Android and iOS devices, you should try to use icons that are already known to users and popular among the Android/iOS ecosystem. For web, you could use Material Design Lite or Polymer to do the same. You can see a list of icons following Material Design for Android here. Now, if you have any icon that is not accurately ...


4

Yes, If desktop users are shown a different version of the site. This is a usability issue. I have seen so many sites that do not display properly on small screens or that do not serve the same content. (usually 'quickmenus'/reduced to content allegedly 90% of users want, not me!)


4

Why did this trend come about? For developing websites there are three major approaches toward how they are developed*: Responsive Web Design Adaptive Web Design Separate "Desktop" and "Mobile" sites Responsive Web Design (RWD) is where a site is designed in a way that it changes to fit whatever screen size it is rendered on. From a technological ...


3

It was mostly used for "m.websites" (ex: m.cnn.com) which are already off trends and slowly fading away. m.website are basically the same copy of your website with a different URL. You will be feeding content to 2 websites at the same time ex: m.cnn.com and cnn.com have duplicates in content with different screen optimisation. The m.website has many ...


3

If you choose list view then the image should be thumbnail size. Show the full image onhover of the thumbnail. If the primary goal is to show bigger image then it's better move towards card view or tile view (Pinterest ) Attached some mockup for reference


2

Choosing a traditional tabular table, where each cell contains one piece of data, has advantages (easy to compare different rows) and disadvantages (lots of columns take up all your horizontal space). Perhaps consider an alternative layout, e.g. UI cards: Using UI cards comes with other advantages, e.g. they can expand and shrink (i.e. Show more... Show ...


2

Have you considered to just show two columns? One with the values (contact, car no., salesperson, price and a host of other details), the second done with the customer name and values, but place a drop down to select each customer. This approach would preserve the vertical list of features so that you only need to select customers. Adding arrows would allow ...


2

I've asked Your questions to our lead ux tester and she answered the next: That is a very good idea - and also proved to be useful - to let the user turn on textual controls or function titles alongside icons on their wish and that is even better when this 'help' switch is available on every page consistently at the same place - but if You put it ...


2

There's a very good read from Aurora Bedford on icon usability: https://www.nngroup.com/articles/icon-usability/ and there's a section arguing that "icons need a text label": To help overcome the ambiguity that almost all icons face, a text label must be present alongside an icon to clarify its meaning in that particular context. (And even if you’re ...


2

Users in shopping mode tend to be rather passive, so I wouldn't require more than 1 click. A simple, small textlink saying something like "This listing is missing information" in a corner of the product view would probably not alienate your third parties, but it would get you the data you need to point you to the content you may want to review. Clicking ...


2

This is a good article/research by NN Group. It also helped me in one of the projects of mine in the e-commerce space. I personally feel the images should be large and the following article/research suggests the same. Also, design is really context specific so it really depends on your specific scenario. Hope this helps. Ecommerce UX: 3 Design Trends to ...


2

It's both annoying and confusing: Annoying because it's covering the images. Confusing because it is out of context. You're on a page where you are looking for offers nearby, there's no reason to include a Sell It button. I recommend you look at this app called Saily for benchmarking. The option for "Buy it" or "Sell it" shouldn't be available on the ...


2

Follow the Facebook method. Assume if you have 20 photos to show and you have space of accommodating 5 photos then add '+15' on the the black overlay of the 5th photo thumbnail image. Refer the attached screenshot for more info


2

Don't use pages. Instead, load more is more effective on small touchscreens, because it's easier to tap accurately and avoids page reloads. As for how many you should load, that same study proposes 15 to 30 items. Any more, and users start needing to scroll too far. Fewer, and users get annoyed that they have to keep tapping all the time. The study's images ...


2

I personally prefer the Second method since it ensures two things. Quality onboarding and diving right into what your app provides. If getting a user to register is your mission, the quality of onboarding needs to be on point. This leads to more creative solutions on how one can give the user an immersive and awesome experience and then at the Success/ ...


2

The way that most desktop sites appear on mobile means that making the text size larger isn't going to be quite as helpful as you might like and may break the layout - potentially making the experience even worse. From an ecommerce point of view, my suggestion would be to have another look at your Google Analytics and see where in the funnel most of your ...


2

I would do both 1 and 2, but also present the user with a message. Having a message will guide the user's expectation and avoid unnecessary concern by the user. The message doesn't have to say much, even just that the form is submitting and will take up to 30s.


2

Just a quick suggestion, you could possibly disable the submit button, but have the text on it change to 'Submitting...' and also disable all of the form fields, so that the user can't then submit the form using the keyboard. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups I don't know about the feasibility of adding a loading ...


2

There are no hard and fast rules. You may pick and choose however you feel best fits your application style and needs. However, there are general guidelines that each mobile platform proposes to enhance the consistency and usability of apps on their platform. You may choose to follow these guidelines if you wish to make your app "fit in" better within a ...


1

Possibly not even if there's a difference between your sites. At least if your user-agent handling works properly. Example: SE on Android mobile has a "full site" link at the bottom. I only realised that when I went looking for it to post this answer. The browser's own menu option for "request dekstop site" is easier to find for two reasons: the menu is ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible