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4

It's best to follow current standards for mapping. That means, in this case, setting a start and end point by either dragging flags into place or tapping on the location while dragging to move the map. Most (if not all) map apps, ie Google maps, Apple maps, Waze, Bing, and more follow this behavior. At the risk of sounding like you should take the safe ...


4

If I understand you right, this is an app for the teacher, to record attendance of students at each lesson. Put yourself into the teacher's shoes (or better, interview a few teachers) and think about the entire process: What is the teacher's motivation? A requirement by the school? The need to factor attendance into grading? You may identify ...


4

Let's face it, serial numbers weren't meant to be consumed by humans. Can you imagine going to the grocery store and waiting for someone to manually enter each and every bar code number for all your items? In your situation I think option 3 is your best bet but I don't see why you couldn't combine option 3 with option 2. If the bar code scanner is failing ...


3

First of all - not ABCD... but autocomplete in search (consider Cyrillic, Greek or other alphabets). Drag-n-drop is a beautiful feauter, but consider dragging aprox. 50 elements. I will be extremely time consuming. Clicking on item on the left to assign it to group will be much easier. For mobile my proposition is to switch view between Available <-> ...


3

Some desktop applications do take left/right handedness into account, for example games often use the WASD keys for directional movement, but also have IJKL set up by default. Equally some applications don't take it into account. When I broke my right wrist and had to hold the mouse with my left hand, I soon realised how the keyboard shortcuts for a lot of ...


2

I would probably group the event messages based on module type and show a badge when collapsed. You may want to only show modules with events but this depends upon how many modules you have and if your users expect to tap the same module in the same location to expand it.


2

I think your beginning is a good way. I recommend you to read a short introduction into user-centered design. First you need to get your user requirements (who does what and why, what is the environment, life cycle, ...). You started already, but in your post the requirements are too generic, too formal - I guess that humans will using the app? If you have ...


2

I'm a left hander, and in my opinion the direction of swiping is dictated by text flow, rather than which hand I use. What's more important, is that the most buttons placed conveniently for right handers are difficult to reach with the other hand. Also, I often find that my thumb is covering some content, especially on lists.


2

I would consider a a modal window the better practice. It keeps the user on the same page, it just gives them a quick glance. If a new tab sporadically opens up, they might get confused and try to hit back (Which won't work in a new tab) then get frustrated. I also never liked moving my mouse all the way to the top of the page just for this small ...


2

They will likely use server side device detection based around the User Agent to show an alternative version of the website. This method is know as Dynamic Serving. Bootstrap uses the viewport width to change the layout via CSS, known as Responsive Web Design. There are use cases and arguments for both techniques. EDIT: I'll expand on the cases for each a ...


2

The UI is right now consistent and improper. Considering user's mind, he will have to run on the screen to perform various actions. The best option to be applied here is your first point. i.e. Hamburger icon on left side. So that the user can have access to all the options in one go. e.g. You will put everything under hamburger icon but for Home button the ...


2

Check out the Ionic framework. It's a newer framework for hybrid apps that just hit 1.0. It's built on Angular, which means it's battle-tested in production apps, and easy to pick up if you're already familiar with the framework, as well as leveraging Cordova (PhoneGap) for cross-platform binaries. Angular has modules or components for everything you should ...


1

If we're talking about mobile, maybe override the default web scroll element and implement a scroll with a native-like behaviour and then show a tag list above it. To add something to list B from list A, click on a row in list A. To remove from list B, click on the tag on list B or click again on the row in list A. download bmml source – ...


1

If this element is important and represents a need for you, then it should be always present. Now, I have no idea what your app is about, but you could consider these choices on top of the above: Ask for feedback after action is completed Let's say your app performs X action, or you have a video or whatever. Then you could end that action with a CTA ...


1

You might want to take a look at how the Google Maps app tackles this on a phone. If you want to see it in action, I've recorded a small video from my phone: Google Maps search results UI on Android [youtube.com] In my opinion, it's the best way to execute that kind of feature. Small note: On the first time, Maps shows a small "tooltip" to indicate that ...


1

You could have (apologies as this is crude): Switches: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups or Suggest 'Hit Area' around the item: download bmml source


1

Yes, there are at least 2 good reasons If you any interactive elements in the body (even an IOS-style ellipsis °°° navigator) it can be confusing to users to "tap on interactive elements, but tap anywhere else to move to the next slide". Users often tap accidentally on mobile devices, so if you decide to do this, make sure you provide a back button of ...


1

None. Assistive Touch is built so users can drag it to wherever they like on the screen to not interfere with any app. Even if you chose to make your app "support" it, that change would also cause anyone else using the app without assistive touch to suffer. It's not a function that Apple allows you to scan whether it's active or not. Just don't do it.


1

For very long lists, it's better to use a different UX for mobile Multi-select is a complex operation, so it's difficult to use the same interface for both web and mobile. You already recognize this because you've outlined two different layouts. Your mobile design is problematic because: It requires users to tap once to add an item, and then select ...


1

Forget the "platform wars" and make the application user friendly from a touch perspective. The most important aspect you must try to achieve is to deliver a seamless experience across multiple platforms (make your app look and feel the same as much as you can on all platforms). As I see your application is not a very complicated so that shouldn't be so ...


1

2nd the call for a modal window, not only because it'll be less confusing for the user, but because on mobile it will also be faster & use less system memory. Most mobile browsers deliberately animate new windows in such a way to tell the user "you're no longer browsing that site - you're going somewhere else now, whether you like it or not!" They may ...


1

We provide retail and stock control systems so accurate capture of barcodes and serial numbers at high speed is important to us. For what its worth, here's what we do, but our target market might be slightly different to yours. Use a barcode scanner. There are bluetooth ones that interface easily to most mobile devices. Of course this costs the end user ...


1

Something like this: Idea is X deletes, lock keeps the notification within the panel, options include swipe to delete etc... Panel scrolls to show more than 4 notifications.



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