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13

Consider using an arrow or caret to denote there's deeper content. It's a common enough icon that's used often at the end of a text blurb for Call To Action buttons. It's not ideal, but should translate okay on a carousel title. e.g.


13

To expand on Tohsters answer, one hamburger menu is already detrimental enough so adding a second one is only going to confuse matters more. If the client cannot be persuaded to follow other avenues then it's probably best to start looking at ways to make the best of a bad situation. (this blog post expands on this ...


9

Two approaches: Denote the caption better as an interactive element. See nightning's excellent answer on this. Make the entire image clickable (not just the caption). Clicking on the body of the image opens the link, and clicking near the arrows operates the carousel navigation. As an aid to web users, you can play with different hover animations ...


8

This is a terrible idea You're right to be suspicious. One hamburger already sucks... Hamburger menus don't test very well to begin with. Here is Apple's UX lead on the subject, and more articles here and here, but to summarize: They hide links and content from the user instead of presenting the user with direct options. The hamburger icon is ...


3

I think this is a good example for asking the question "What does the client need?" vs. "What does the client want?". So if I understand your question correctly, your client wants to present two websites under one address and probably also under one one design. Whether this is a good idea or not is not within the scope of my answer – for now I just try to ...


3

The problem is in having something that looks flat and yet stands out enough to look touchable. To add touchable cues you need to put some kind of border around each independently touchable thing - to separate it from the adjacent touchable thing, and to make the figure stand out from the ground. Google's material design principles provide some ...


3

You're right in not making decisions based upon your own assumption. What you could do is usability testing with actual people. The best test would be conducted with 5-7 (or more) testpersons from the actual targeted audience in an environment they will be using the app or at least in an environment where they are comfortable. If you don't have time to ...


3

I agree with the comments mentioning the need to capture frequently used browser functionality but given the controls shown in your mock-up (7-8 items) I think a possible solution could focus on the following: 1. Grouping controls in one location: By doing so you can remove clutter, preserve some room to scale-up if you need to include additional ...


3

I see no reason why not. Provided the following holds true. No impact on normal user operation This are advance user actions. As such, they may not be easily discoverable to every user. It may not be intended for a normal user to perform those operations. In any case, there should not be any impact on normal operation of the user. The usability and ...


2

Quick critique: Feature-richness vs ergonomic minimalism is a key tradeoff here. You want the remote to be fully featured, but to be simple enough to use that it's not intimidating. That is a balance that most remotes do NOT get right. Circular shapes are problematic here. I understand why you would use circular shapes because they are 'friendly'. But ...


2

Also underline. An arrow is probably better in 88% of cases, but if adding an arrow seems to disagree with an UI then underlining is definitely the way to go. If you're going to introduce shopping, even more so. I'm just say saying. (tags don't include <u> ?)


2

From a visual point of view, 2 sizes is OK, different sizes for input fields is very confusing, and the same applies if you expect to input 2 characters and have room for 40. The user will wonder if they need to add something else in most cases, so visual hinting plays a role. Of course, like Chris commented, you need to keep in mind that under a certain ...


2

If you mean apps to use in your development, yes, there are many commercial and pretty good tools like AppSee, Heatmaps.io and so on. I don't know and I doubt there's anything free other than free trials for those commercial apps. If you mean research, there's a lot scattered around the web. The old and classic mobile UX research by Mozilla is always a good ...


1

Here is some advice for you: First, confirm to your client that you respect his/her opinion. Don't argue! Second, clarify with him/her that you create a product for users, not for yourselves. Third, organize usability testing and invite your client to participate. Then, create two prototypes, one the way your client wanted, and other the way you want. ...


1

Just an idea that might help or give an other perspective. Old conventions are often intuitive until the point where your target audience is to young to remember. Analog clocks work by rotating the wheel, just one wheel. You have to keep turning it until you reached the right time. Intuitive? Most likely, but efficient? Not really. To perhaps make it more ...


1

App design is new as a profession so I have borrowed wisdom from a much older profession for getting design perspective: method acting. User stories, psychographics, and personas are very common approaches to the initial/ideation phase of app design. I've found that they are helpful descriptive approaches, but I've found it more powerful to spend time ...


1

I think the following activities can help to expand the perception of every UX professional: Usability testing (as much as you can) Constant research (new studies, trends, recognized blogs, etc) Participating in communities like this! Knowing your app use cases.


1

I would say definitely sacrifice the images on mobile. Don't think of it as a sacrifice though, just an efficiency :-) You'll never cater for the full breadth of mobile devices with a large menu and images - keep it simple and get the users where they want to go. By the looks of things the links have very concise titles so the images are just for aesthetic ...


1

Syncing files from two potentially offline sources is a hard problem that is basically impossible to solve in a way that makes sense all the time. For evidence of this, look no further than the complexity of the tools programmers use to solve this problem for source files rather than game saves: http://git-scm.com/ https://subversion.apache.org/ ...


1

I'd just like to provide a slight counterpoint - not quite answering your question (tohster and nightning have done that well), but answering a point behind your question: Carousels are bad UX. See http://shouldiuseacarousel.com/ . It makes the point succinctly and effectively. It references pages such as ...


1

Yes you should. Expert accelerators These so called expert accelerators are truly useful in UX since they allow an interface design that is both minimalistic and clean for new users, yet increase efficiency to expert users. Keyboard shortcuts are a great example for this. Expert accelerators are often 'unseen', meaning you need to delved into this manual ...


1

Do it Breakpoints serve at the pleasure of content Far too many "responsive" sites are designed to fixed breakpoints, and fail to size smoothly for screen widths in between the breakpoints. At best this is brittle responsive design and at worst it's barely responsive at all. Notable offenses include column layouts and images which size OK at fixed ...


1

"What are the advantages/disadvantages of using caps for all words in mobile application design?" Do you mean ALL CAPS ALL THE TIME? Or Capital Case Only For The First Letter? Disadvantages ALL CAPS looks like you're SHOUTING! Bad if there's no semantic reason for this. Can feel like it crowds other elements, especially on mobile where space is at a ...



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