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7

It's tempting to say that because we're not used to it, it must not be a good experience. I think we mean that change is necessarily a good experience... it's not comfortable, but the end result may actually be better than what we had before. We are used to toolbars, but how often do we get lost in menus or confused by a row of buttons? The single floating ...


5

The good: Fitt's Law: The bad: The biggest flaw in Google's Material design resides in feedback when you press a button. In the physical world a pressed button recedes into the background; in Google's Lollipop the opposite happens, when you press a button, it floats, which is contrary to what the user is accostumed to.


2

I would say there there is just as much change of a user missing a poorly sign-posted rollover on desktop as mobile. I use a + symbol to indicate more in these instances, and sometimes where there is a series of rollovers containing more info, I have the first one open by default to show the user what's there. Generally I really don't think we should be ...


2

Provide a default action and update to the user's preference from there. The least amount of information required is an e-mail, so just let them enter that inline with the rest of the complaint/concern form. The user can now just enter an e-mail, enter their complaint and hit submit. Quick and easy. download bmml source – Wireframes created ...


2

It's hard to say one way or the other. We can list pros and cons and offer opinions but at the end of the day, it's going to be heavily opinion based. All that said, do be careful of judging screen shots. A big hurdle we in UX have to face is feedback coming to us based on static documentation...wireframes, mockups, screen shots, etc. None of these provide ...


1

I would agree with most of the comments already written, but I'd like to add a little more in case it's useful to you. There are some great articles that suggest you 'delay requiring the user to login until absolutely necessary' (see: http://www.sitepoint.com/improving-apps-onboarding-ux/). Similar to the iTunes store, AirBnB, Quora, and others, try to ...


1

In a way, this is very similar to how online purchases are made. The store, or in this case the municipality, would prefer if the user created an account. In this case the municipality asserts that the user would prefer to create an account but that probably won't be the case as complaints are reactionary and usually preferred to be made anonymously. ...


1

There isn't really a need to change the look of the icon, as users experienced with "hamburger" menus know that most of them close the same way that they are opened: by pushing the hamburger button. However, if you really want to change the button icon to help improve the user experience by providing more information to the user, then why not change the ...


1

I will first leave this article, taken from WWDC 2014, which discusses Apple's attitude on using hamburger menus: http://blog.manbolo.com/2014/06/30/apple-on-hamburger-menus Here is another article that actually discusses user engagement in a real application that switched to a drawer (aka: hamburger menu) and then promptly switched back when they realized ...


1

Well, there's a couple of ways you could go. An obvious one, just leaving out some less important columns when scaling down Flip scroll. When scaling down, the headers at the top 'flip' to the left and allow the table to be scolled horizontally. Important note, the header labels stay in place. It looks something like this: I've used this method before ...


1

I'm not sure if you can control that the site is opened in a webview under other apps (I don't think so). There is no way to deal with it, some apps open the sites in-app, some others do it in the browser (safari). You can't do anything about it. Maybe the best way to deal with it is basically avoid fixed headers in mobile webs, so you will have only one ...


1

A couple of solutions may help you here but it depends on the level of control you have over the user flow between the app providing the key and your app receiving it. QR Codes If the user is getting an API key from a service in a desktop browser to passing this to your mobile app you could consider implementing QR codes in the desktop view and a reader ...


1

Object-oriented actions In all examples of Material Design that implement the floating action button, we've seen an object-oriented concept at play within apps: Email (Inbox) Document (Docs/Drive) News (Newsstand) Direction (Maps) Arguably the concept of a singular most important action creates a nicely hierarchy of user actions surrounding the key ...


1

In some cases I could see it blending in with whatever's behind it, which would be a bad thing. People who are left-handed could still potentially have to change how they're holding their device in order to press the button since it may be out-of-reach, depending on how far they can reach with their thumb.


1

At first glance, this appears to be similar to having a carousel within a browser window. This pattern works well for browsing a series of items. There are in-page indicators of scrolling progress and the UI is arranged in a way that delineates between window-level and component-level scrolling. In other words make sure your target areas are designed to ...


1

disclaimer: I am a developer, with personal interest for UI and UX. So my main competencies are on the dev side: feel free to comment and let me know if something I say is questionable. What kind of style you want your UI to have? Using rounded corners VS square corners have IMO more implication than just solving the "blend with background" issue, I'm ...



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