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5

There are very few advantages to using all caps, and that is why we usually don't. When we read text, largely what our brains are doing is recognizing the overall shape of words, rather than the individual letters. Lowercase letters have different sizes and visual densities; some have ascenders sticking up, or descenders sticking down. This means that ...


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A con I see immediately is the use of the mouse wheel, unless you are able to override the default vertical behaviour with an horizontal one. UPDATE: The same is valid for the Page Up and Page Down keys. May be you want them to behave like the List Mode of Windows Explorer.


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According to Apple's official iOS Human Interface Guidelines, page 147, "A toolbar always appears at the bottom edge of a screen or view on an iPhone". Therefore, I would recommend following their recommendations.


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How many inputs should be presented on each page? And does this depend on categorisation of inputs? My thought is the grouping of the inputs is more important than the number. For example, the workflow for setting up an iOS device is divided into screens for language, Wi-Fi, location services, etc. The number of inputs for each grouping is less ...


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If there are a small set of choices, it might make the most sense to have the user drag them into the ranking they want (drag your first pick to the top of the list, second pick under them, etc.) If you want to scale this to a large set of choices (assuming only a small set of ranked positions), you might want some kind of search with autocomplete so that ...


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I wrote a huge answer, deleted it and got to the point: sub-header Mixing navigation styles isn't a good idea, you will likely confuse your users. The key to good navigation is a clear structure and consistent behaviour, so if you can try to make it as simple and easy for your users then you'll find that they will appreciate it more. Same thing with ...


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If you need a collection of innovative keyboard layouts, you can go to this website. Some of them are not listed in the answers above. http://android.appstorm.net/roundups/productivity-roundups/15-awesome-keyboards-for-android/


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Here's a classic usability answer: "That depends." Will your app facilitate Facebook messaging, or be more like a messaging system dependent on phone numbers? Will your users communicate with their "social media" friends, or might your app be used to communicate with business contacts as well? I lean toward ArtOfCode's suggestion in offering choice. That ...


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I found this to be an interesting question. I run into issues with abbreviations quite a bit, some people prefer to use one that's make sense to them while ignoring the official standards and vice versa. Shorthand seems to be an interesting option. After quite a bit of research I only found one study and it's not exactly what I expected. The study focuses ...


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You may want to retain the recognisability of traditional (printed) voting cards as to make the transition from print to digital a lot easier for a user. Something deemed too complicated (e.g. drag and drop) may cause problems if you are trying to optimise for the largest audience possible. Take your second image in your screenshot for example. This could ...


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Voting is a general pattern that is seen not just for elections but on many other websites as well (like this one). The biggest advantage about making the voting form digital is that you can make changes easily, and have more flexibility in being able to change the order and ranking of the votes much easier compared to pencil and paper. The features that I ...


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In the case you have to adapt to small number of choices, you could try something like this: It is a simple form with two selects and a table. It could working on mobile devices and desktop systems. Also could be easy to collect the data and implement the form. It is just an idea. :)


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One of the first things to do when attempting to design a UI is to determine what information you need to display to the user, and I know this sounds like a no-brainer, but it's actually a very important step. Once you have a list of this (for you something like "stocks, return, time period, etc.") you can begin to see how the different data sets or ...


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The technical term for that is "Incremental Filtering". It's always hard (particularly in mobile) to show big sets of data, but IF the user is going to know who to send this to right away, for example, if the user is going to have the addressee already in mind, the expected behavior is for the user to start typing the friend's name, and this is optimum. I ...


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Most mice only support vertical scrolling. In mac os you can hold shift (maybe you can in windows too?) to make the scroll wheel horizontal, but don't expect the average user to know that. Once people use tablets, though, horizontal scrolling should not be a problem. How is your business data organized? If it is an excel-like table view with potentially a ...


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Multiple user actions to get to the same effect is not necessarily bad. The chat button is the obvious way, the swipe is the fast way. An analogy on the desktop would be menu items (obvious) and keyboard shortcuts (fast). (I don't think anyone's ever suggested keyboard shortcut's are any kind of anti-pattern, but not positive.) Of course on a touch UI ...


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I think there a few very solid reasons to allow one area of content to be accessed by multiple gestures. User education and the introduction of new features being two of them. In the Facebook example you mention, I think the chat icon serves as a stepping stone. After touching the icon and witnessing the animation / location of the friends list, Facebook ...


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I don't think you have a UX issue here as you already solved that. It's more of a UI problem with the flatness of your design. There is no affordance here. Am I supposed to tap or click on N/A... You see what I mean? Make them look like you should touch them. If its a survey I would also consider to definitely NOT pre-select anything as you showed in your ...


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Horizontal navigation is really good, but only when the user is actually doing a swipe action across the screen. To put this in another way, its good on handheld touch devices. A Web App might not be good target for horizontal navigation unless its made in a really wise way. Now from the way I understand the working of your app, the illustration on the ...


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I see the main pro as the user's retention of orientation within the app. If the horizontal scrolling keeps a portion of the list visible when the edit fields are toggled as illustrated in your example, it should be clear to the user how to return to the list (whether through a swipe gesture, 'back' button or 'cancel' button referring to the cancellation of ...


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The only scenario in which you could avoid a separate authentication mechanism (for example a password) is when the user has both devices or SIM cards at hand. I assume sim card id is equal to phone number to keep it easy, you should have no problem to extend the examples. User has neither the old sim card nor the old phone. (For example after a year at a ...


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If you think about it, the default iOS guidelines somewhat reflects Jef Raskin's idea about zooming interfaces: As you work your way deeper into the navigation hierarchy transition animations will slide you towards right and if you move back they will slide you to the left. If there is some sort of contextual popover it will always slide in from the ...


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I would suggest something like below Separate the Notification by date Usability wise user will be easily distinguish the notification by date It frees the space for date/time I would suggest to put the time on right, Reason it'll always take limited space on screen since date part it gone :) You can change the color of component according to your ...


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At tradus.com We use the below We show the entire cart in first scroll. In second scroll we show the address / payment options. The header button changes according to the information filled. i.e If the address / payment information is filled , the button says "Payment>" which take user to payment. Else we show "Checkout" which actually scroll down to ...



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