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81

The three dot symbol is called an 'ellipsis' and has been used in text since at least 1588 Originally it signified a pause or tailing off in speech but, in modern times, it also signifies and implied continuance of any textual content. An example of the modern usage might be in webpages where you sometimes find "More after the jump..." meaning that an ...


57

The physical mute and volume buttons affect all other apps too. It's better to have a mute button in your app because as a user I may only want to mute the notifications from your app and not others. For example, there's a chance I want to mute Facebook notifications but not those from Twitter. So for that I'd need a mute button in Facebook because the ...


52

MSN Messenger Service How do you feel about the typing indicator—“David is typing”—that appears on your buddy’s screen while you’re composing a message in chat? Does it make you feel self-conscious about how long you’re taking to write a message? Do you hate it when you are multitasking and your erstwhile best friend keeps sending messages like ...


44

While space is an obvious part of the equation, it's not the main one, you could simply have a sliding physical keyboard just as previous generations of smartphones and be a happy camper. However, physical keyboards had several issues: smaller keys than on-screen keys structural weakness short lifetime (the flex connector and pieces of sliding keyboards ...


33

What caused this decline in the use of physical keyboards? The iPhone What is the impact on the UX of mobile devices? This is a pretty deep question and is tough to answer objectively. I would argue that dropping the physical keyboard was a net gain. That the benefits it brought far outweighed the usefulness of the physical keyboard. As others have ...


23

The main reason is versatility. A keyboard in software can be easily adapted to different layouts, different character/symbol sets and different cultures. In addition, custom keyboards such as Swype or Word Flow are then feasible. Physical keyboards add to the physical complexity of the device, have to be revealed (deployed) to be usable and are more ...


11

TL;DR: An app forcing me to use the global mute would be uninstalled in the blink of an eye. So they better have a mute function if they want to use audio at all. EDIT: The previous was a bit too short for an answer, here's an explanation: Audio is in essence quite intrusive, that is, you can hardly block it out. That's different from vision - you can ...


11

The Apple Human Interface Guidelines are 'Guidelines', not 'rules' - you don't have to follow them entirely, design and build what you like.


10

What creates confusion i.m.o. is the back and the close button being on the same level in the visual hierarchy where as they act on different levels. Wouldn't it be more clear when the close button is visually more separated from the back button? I would not recommend moving the previous/back button and replace it with a close button, because now the user ...


9

A keyboard has obvious costs: Increased device size. Reduced space for a screen. Mechanical complexity/manufacturing costs. The need to localize the keyboard to different languages. On the other hand, the main benefit of a keyboard was easier data entry. At one point, a keyboard was worth it despite the costs, for this reason, because touch screens were ...


9

Just a small extra consideration but I'll make it an answer anyway. I tend to listen to the radio via an app whilst playing casual games so need to be able to choose which app's volume to control. If I had to use the volume control for all apps I wouldn't be able to complete half of my objective (as I want to do both). This goes beyond the other answers that ...


8

I would encourage you to consider whether a cancel button is truly necessary in this situation. What is the likelihood that the user will wish to cancel their entire submission? Is it more likely that the user would wish to change pieces of the submission more easily accessible using the back navigation rather than the entire submission? Will other ...


7

Mobile OSes usually have broad scoped sound controls instead of app specific ones. Android (AOSP) sound volume has three separated controls: one for general effects and notifications, another one for multimedia apps and the last one for alarms. But those are system-wide, so adding sound controls into the app you can control the app specific sound volume ...


6

I find the second version confusing. I think that the same button should be placed at the same place in the different screens. But I have to say that I find the first option confusing as well. To me, the button on the left should go back and the button on the right should go forward. Maybe it is a good idea to give us some more information of the rest of ...


5

Short Answer: After the sign up (You always want the user to first get on board with the application, Rest come later!) Long Answer: Simplest thing to do is observe how already established and successful applications do it. For example, Pinterest, Twitter asks user to select "area of interest" after signing up with the application. If user is on-board ...


5

Most probably because of 2 trends in the smartphone industry. Phones get thinner and thinner, and losing a physical keyboard makes a phone a lot less thick. Screens on phones kept getting bigger, and started using touchscreen. The combination of these gave to option to type on your screen by tabbing a "digital" keyboard. The downside to this though, is ...


4

This is actually a really good example of Darwinian evolution in action: The natural analog might be something like a flight-capable wing on an ostrich: The natural habitat for ostriches favours running for a bird of that size. A large wing would only cause drag and use energy and nutrients that would be better spent on powerful legs - many thousands of ...


4

Generally you want to reduce any initial friction, especially in B2C apps. So you ask for as little as possible at the start and make sure the user gets to experience the core value as quickly as possible. Said that, there's one important consideration. Sometimes you need a bit of extra information at the start to deliver great value and experience. For ...


4

Hamburger menus, like it or not, are widely recognized Inertia: everyone else is doing it, so we did it and now it's done (until the next major redesign/funding come along) Burgers take up very little space and lend themselves to being tucked into a corner of the screen In many instances, they are effective I want to address that last item in particular. ...


4

Do follow the conventions. I have heard this from many service providers voice answering machines: To go back to main manu, press 0. # is used after dailing the number. Please enter you pass-code and press # * is used for many messaging service like the one you mentioned in your question *123.


4

Generally, for mobiles, breadcrumbs are not recommended; the back button is what the users are familiar with. Also, it is said that; if your app needs a breadcrumb then your app is not easy to use. Even though, if you really want to introduce one - try what Windows does for the deep hierarchies:


4

The other answers have explained (excellently!) the origin of the ellipsis symbol, and how older chat programs displayed typing indicators. However, this doesn't directly answer the question. To my knowledge, the first mobile app use of the "three dots in a bubble" indicator is iMessage. As Samuel pointed out in his comment, this was taken from iChat on the ...


4

Guidelines are guidelines. If you follow the guidelines, you are leveraging the platform's consistency. This reduces the cognitive load for your users because they already have an innate understanding of how to use your app, and because your app is more likely to feel like it fits along with everything else on their phone. If you choose not to follow ...


4

Summary: Carousel control has some drawbacks on mobile. More straightforward solution could work better. Still, A/B test is the best way to evaluate the idea. Some consideration on using carousel control: Interaction style People interact with a mobile in a specific way. You can find some insights in the How Do Users Really Hold Mobile Devices? ...


4

Yes. It is a pain and iOS is doing it wrong. You should never impose your rules on user. They won't like you and this is the fact that most Android user hate iOS. Sites should definitely allow case sensitive usernames, but you should never assume that all users will have their first character capital. Edit: Here's a good workaround to avoid that - it's ...


3

That sounds like 6 different apps to me. My mental model of an "app" is more focused than the use case you describe. Pretending I'm the target audience you mention in the comment on your post, I would likely think "I need to open my photo app to annotate this image" or "I need to log my hours and check-in to my work site on my timesheet app." Folders on my ...


3

Both (hamburger and nav bar) have advantages and disadvantages that make them suitable in particular contexts. It very much comes down to how much value your users get from functionality that you consider for your main navigation, and more objectively, how often they use that functionality. Spotify is a great example where a nav bar makes a lot of sense: ...


3

It's not capitalizing form fields but automatically running sentence case. If you break text with a '.' or start a piece of text in a new field it will automatically capitalize the next letter as it guesses that you've ended one sentence and started the next. In cases where you don't leave a space after the '.' it assumes you're typing a web address and ...


2

It's best to ask for the info you require from your users to access and start using the app. The user shouldn't be blocked by an unnecessary question at any point during use of the app. Remember mobile, with slow connections and small screens and consider the impact of complex forms in this context. There are a couple of ways you can do this: Ask for ...


2

In the past people used to use cellphones mainly to talk and text only, nowadays people doesn't use smartphones JUST for that, so you don't need to use the keyboard all the time but just on demand which allows to place a bigger screen to offer an overall better experience without losing any functionality. It's a cost benefit adaptation, you can emulate a ...



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