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6

I am a strong supporter of concentrating on a single object at a time when rating. This makes it less overwhelming for the user. I think some kind of swipeable card system would make this rating system more intuitive and maximizes the space you have for each object's variable number of rating systems: First mockup: Initial state. First object to be rated....


4

Two usable options come to mind. 1. Accordion menus 2. Sliding panels


4

The initial assumption is wrong: Regardless of their dominant hand, people seem to use their phone in their non-dominant hand as well, and vice-versa. An old question on Quora gives some insights on this: https://www.quora.com/Which-hand-do-you-hold-your-iPhone-in-when-using-it-one-handed There is no clear winner: dominant holds vary In addition, we hold ...


3

Please don't flip anything away from where a user planned to touch a second ago.. If a user sees the settings ≡ icon on the right top while holding the phone in their right hand and cannot reach it with right thumb, they might as well move the phone to the left hand and reach for the icon with their right-hand index finger. So it shouldn't suddenly move to ...


2

Any interaction is only useful if the target users understand it. I'd suggest making a quick and dirty prototype that just has the radial slider and asking users to input various values and see how they get on. You should also test inputting the same values using two sliders, two text fields with number pads, and any other methods you can think of that ...


2

I think you're on the right track. However, I do think you need to consider a few things. Multi-step forms My wife's parents own a farm and you never know what can happen on any given day (tractor breaking down, missing cows, faulty livestock scales, etc) so I would provide: a way for the user to select which part of the multi-step form they want to ...


2

If the function is hidden, the first thing comes up to my mind is to display a self-explanatory icon. Like this: About the rows, you seem to have the same problem: the function is hidden. Try to use the same design rules that are commonly used for Call to Action buttons (for example use visual affordances to look the row as it was something "tapable"). ...


2

I create a little prototype to deal with this situation on devices with little space. You can find it here http://5rsg1w.axshare.com/ First you show your users a Menu-Button Then the first level navigation apear After clicking on one of the link the user will see the second navigation Then the user can click on the link 1 or on one link of the second level ...


1

I think the problem that user would face is inability to 'Quickly Refer' desired content if all the content is displayed at same time to the user. Displaying four long lists won't help. A tab based view would work better in this scenario. User would still have access to top level topics (Carbs, Vegetable, Proteins...) at one place and it would work ...


1

I suggest you forget about minimizing the amount of clicks, specially on mobile. Number of clicks don't really matter if user knows exactly what (s)he wants. You can simply divide the content on pages, tabs or accordion menus. Must read: Stop Counting Clicks Must read: UX Myths


1

Is generating the report a major action from this tool, or a minor sub-feature? If it's a major action that's a primary purpose, then I'd strongly suggest putting the tools to do so in a very obvious place. If they're not needed once entered, then they can go away at that point, or have their visual impact reduced in some way... but if a user HAS to enter ...


1

I would suggest not to hide important things like your required options. But to answer your question I have some ideas for you: Modal Infobox Show a little yellow infobox on top of the page containing some sentence like "Don't forget the options" followed by your icon. This box can fadeout after 2 seconds. Blinking Icon Make your icon blink for 2 or 3 ...


1

I think users tend to relate better with what they can see at a glance..They get frustrated when they have to find features etc..Maybe it's not a bad thing to show the options on the page but hide some of the fields in an accordion when they click it expands.


1

I clicked around with that radial slider in the link you provided and can tell you that I much prefer more standard methods of input (numerical input, horizontal sliders/range selectors, etc.). Why? Because a number range doesn't conceptually end where it begins as the radial slider shows. Furthermore, it tends to be a bit unclear how to update the range ...


1

Michael, I was think the same for right/left hand user, please correct me if i am wrong flipping the entire interface to the other side Should not flip the entire interface because for understanding / reading the information/content we do not required either right/left hand, rather the languages which required to read from right to left, required vision (...


1

You bring up a very valid point and one that reflects some of the annoyance from owners of larger smartphone devices. I know people who have downsized their phone specifically for this reason. My suggestion would be to keep action buttons - ones that require touch feedback from the user - toward the bottom of the screen. This requires far less dexterity ...


1

Not sure the use case for this. what are the tabs? what does the app do? I think perhaps there is a way to prompt your users to move to the next tab without auto-moving to the it. The issue is it's an action that the user can not undo, if i'm scrolled at the bottom of a long list, then auto moved to another list...i just lost my place. Also it's not a ...



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