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7

I saw this tweet yesterday. Where did the now ubiquitous hamburger menu icon ≡ come from? Xerox—already in 1981 http://t.co/1fSOIYDvM4 by @geoffa pic.twitter.com/nWDI8E0ClX— Antti Latva-Koivisto (@anttilk) 30 maart 2014 Although Xerox seems to be the first to use it on computer, there is no definite data (yet) on who used it on the ...


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The standard today is to have one website that responds to the device it is being viewed on. The experience should be tailored for that device. For example, a website being viewed on mobile might respond to use a fly-out side menu, instead of a drop down horizontal menu in the header. Also, mobile sites should have everything the desktop version of the site ...


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With that said, are there any outstanding reasons to produce a mobile version of a site that is substantially different than the desktop version? Antiquated corporate product management and development processes and out-of-date developer skills and/or technology infrastructure. In many (most?) cases that's what it boils down to. Why do we have two ...


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Since it is a web based application, i would suggest to display small number of data to the user and provide proper filters or search options to the user to find desired data (in your case village name). you can try couple of options here. Option 1: You can provide a text field for village name with search option. user should be able to type 3-4 letters and ...


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You might be asking too much of your users. Or maybe not. First you have to decide if tabs are the right approach. A. Are users going to be switching between them to reference info? B. Or will they more likely choose a path and move on? If A, you're on the right path. If B, you should navigate them to the right area and leave the other "tabs" behind. ...


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Jakob Nielson describes the 3 time limits which he calls the 'Response-Time Limits': There are 3 main time limits (which are determined by human perceptual abilities) to keep in mind when optimizing web and application performance It is an article written in 1993, but three years ago he published a new research report on website response times ...


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There are several reasons for decisions like this: Mobile apps tend to favor simplicity over efficiency. The quick view is a convenience feature that can potentially make the app more confusing/cluttered without helping deliver on the core functionality. Features like the quick view make it faster to use the app, but end up being more confusing for users. ...


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Allowing members, registered users, access to different functions than people who didn't sign up is common, but those are functions that are appended to the normal set of functions. Eliminating functions after log in is a definite no-go! I would suggest to add member functions like tasks, documents and settings to the regular set of functions like ...


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Will the geo data for all users be pulled in a batch every 5 minutes? If so you could probably do away with the (potentially confusing) changing avatars, and simply put something on the top or bottom of the screen advising the user of the time since the last refresh - You might even give the user the ability to 'force' a refresh of the data. If you were ...


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I recall that 2 sec is when some start dropping out nowadays. Of course it depends on the site and the situation. Also it depends on the timing of separate parts of the site. For example, layout, text, and image placeholders might load earlier while images load later. Other stuff can happen in the background. Perceived performance is more important than ...


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I don't think the user needs an extra link to help close their browser window, as there's already a standard close button that they know how to use. Instead, suggest that they've completed registration, and tell them that they can close the window. And, even better, have a button to go to what they were trying to do before they registered (like commenting ...


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For a very small amount of detail information, the standard way to display details would be to have a + beside "Interior", which when clicked slides down to display the extra details. For larger amounts of information you will probably want to have an arrow (pointing off screen to indicate another screen is available) beside "interior", which takes you to a ...


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I didn't do a formal study on a contrasting color scheme, the following is what I found over the course of a weekend. During an app contest last year, I created a transit application which used black and white in hopes that it would be easier to see outdoors on a sunny day because of the contrast of colours. Here is a screen shot: Since it was a ...


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Tabs are often misused. Being metaphoric to real-world file tabs, tabs are content clustering controls. They shouldn't be used as a selection control (replacing buttons or checkboxes). Just to give one example of how things can go wrong, when users switch tabs they expect the tab content to change. Often tabs used as selection controls keep the same panel ...


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An analogy first: A pig looks different than a horse. They have different uses and characteristics, and seeing them we instantly set our minds to their specific context. A mule and a donkey look similar, but they have very different abilities and uses. If you could make a mule and a donkey from scratch, wouldn't you make them look more different than they ...


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I think the dual dropdown menus may be a little confusing, since they appear to be conditional or part of the same form action (i.e. selection from first dropdown changes what's available in second dropdown, or any number of other assumptions). Would you consider moving the 3 sub-page links into your mobile navigation? It's very common to see sub-navigation ...


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You answered your own question when you said: It's worth to mention that you can't play around with application while we are doing this. Since that's the case, you need a true modal dialog which let's the user know they can't do anything until the syncing is finished. Therefore, you have to go with Option B.


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Try using a stylized right-pointing triangle just before the text. By "stylized", I mean in keeping with your site's colour scheme, and possibly with a little subtle 3D bevelling on it, depending on context. You can probably find a lot of examples of this kind of subtle link indication around the web; it's not that uncommonly used.


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I have mine fixed to the bottom right of the screen and my customers find it there quite easily. I definitely use a bright color that is different than the rest of the user interface. I would not hide it on any user interface, mobile or otherwise. That will only lead to problems.


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The view cart action is probably the second most important action on the product listing part of the site (The first is "add to bag"). Every single person who wants to use the site for its primary purpose (buying things) needs to click that button. Hiding the interaction behind a drop-down menu is doing a disservice both to the users who want to check out ...


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A little late to the party but I'm developing a project with a designer who is absolutely in love with modals. For mobile devices in 2014, modals are still a poor UX choice because of positioning and scrolling issues. They are most often JavaScript driven, which means if accessibility is important to your project then there will be a cross section of site ...



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