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1

I would honestly build the least amount possible, release it and wait for people to ask for more features. Start with allowing simple text input and auto-linking urls. Autolinking can make it easy to spam your forum though, so watch out.


1

I'd put in a small button that shows (expands) / hides (collapses) the more advanced Stack-Exchange-style features. It's convenient to access, but doesn't clutter anything if the user doesn't want or need it.


1

Showing help text to the right may pose a few issues like For a long message text you may have to wrap the message several times. So it may appear like a block of text instead of a message. If the message text lengths keep varying based on the field in concern then these block sizes will keep changing invariably with the fields You may not be able to use ...


0

Quick note, 'Shopping Cart' it typically two words. So you actually are dealing with 3 words. I think you reducing the size is fine, but... ...keep in mind that word wrapping is not something that should be a focus. The web is flexible. That's one of the great things about it. And part of that flexibility is not having 100% control over typography. ...


0

You could simply replace the word with the shopping icon. It simply becomes a symbol for the words you want in that space and is more of a universal graphic to convey the same information. On smaller screens your options are either making your text smaller (which can hamper legibility depending on the font especially) versus the layout you want.


0

Copy / paste is the clunkiest thing when it comes to mobile. You can at least ease the pain of copying by embedding the functionality into a one-tap button and have that perform the copying part for you. This example is from addthis.com. Clicking on "Grab It" automatically copies the code in the box. This solution is also super convenient for users on ...


0

In matters of UX, a webpage IS allowed to force a certain orientation. The problem is, browsers are not allowed to access a phone's native functions like the camera and the accelerometer. It is expected webapps will have the same access as native apps in the near future, meaning phones will give developers APIs to access the camera and the accelerometer, we ...


2

With that said, are there any outstanding reasons to produce a mobile version of a site that is substantially different than the desktop version? Antiquated corporate product management and development processes and out-of-date developer skills and/or technology infrastructure. In many (most?) cases that's what it boils down to. Why do we have two ...


0

From my perspective there are two things to consider here: What does the user expect of a website viewed on a mobile device in terms of what he wants to achieve there What does the user epect of a website viewed on a mobile device in terms of performance With regard to 1 I would say you are right, generally one can assume that the goals a user wants to ...


3

The standard today is to have one website that responds to the device it is being viewed on. The experience should be tailored for that device. For example, a website being viewed on mobile might respond to use a fly-out side menu, instead of a drop down horizontal menu in the header. Also, mobile sites should have everything the desktop version of the site ...


0

Mobile devices have very different UX requirements to desktop/laptop computers. Here are a couple of examples from the top of my head: Touch interfaces need a few-mm gap between links to avoid the fat-finger problem Touch interfaces have no "hover" state Phone interfaces are designed to be read top to bottom If you have multiple layers of menu on a ...


2

Since it is a web based application, i would suggest to display small number of data to the user and provide proper filters or search options to the user to find desired data (in your case village name). you can try couple of options here. Option 1: You can provide a text field for village name with search option. user should be able to type 3-4 letters and ...


2

Provide functionality to let the user drill down the number of items to choose from. Do this by using properties of the item the user knows about. In your case you could ask in which state the village is in or what the first two postal code digits of the village are.


1

Try using a stylized right-pointing triangle just before the text. By "stylized", I mean in keeping with your site's colour scheme, and possibly with a little subtle 3D bevelling on it, depending on context. You can probably find a lot of examples of this kind of subtle link indication around the web; it's not that uncommonly used.



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