Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

It would be worth testing whether users actually scroll, to identify whether this is a real issue. Consider using various visual cues as discussed above: content continuing below the fold is usually enough to prompt users to scroll. Avoid full width horizontal lines, as these can sometimes cause users to think they are at the bottom of the page. Remember ...


1

make your page scrollable. i think that users will scroll if they are interested in the content with scrolling action. half-visible content like photos, images will help user to understand there is more content. Edited: If you have a horizontal sliding action, LinkedIn slider can be good option.


5

A few options: You could leave a little bit of content above the fold where possible which will help to indicate there is more below. You could build anchored links into the copy that will take people down the page e.g. 'We're amazing designers' with the word designers taking users down the page to the portfolio section. An arrow can feel tired I agree. ...


2

The recommendation is typically to go responsive. Barring that, there is no one recommended size. That's something you need to decide based on your users' needs, the context of your site, your business needs, etc.


3

Setting default viewport size is typically used for responsive or mobile-optimized sites to prevent unnecessary resizing of the viewport because the webpage has been optimized for that particular viewing format. If you have a fixed width site that is NOT optimized for small screens. Then you really should not be setting a viewport size and allow the native ...


0

I think that your checkout process is clear enough without the order summary as an additional "check" for the customer. The most common process would be the following: Cart Summary Delivery Payment Confirmation/Thank you Lots of people use their online shopping cart as an informal shortlist. They are basically curating the contents of their order after ...


-2

NO need to show all details. Just Product thumbnail, name and quantity. Customer has already made up his mind to buy something and that is why he has put it in his cart. Also showing too much information may distract the customer. This is my opinion. You can consider A/B test. I was doing this study and research for more than 3 months for my company and ...


3

The Material Design documents are very well written, but one of the surprising omissions is the lack of examples for forms. That said, your issue is easily answered: Submit buttons are the same as other buttons in material design The choice between flat, raised, and floating styles for a submit button depends on the context of the form. For example, if ...



Top 50 recent answers are included