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Though it depends on what type of users you are dealing with, but in most of the cases yes it's required. For example if there is a page of "terms and conditions" , or say "our team". Because of mental model of the user(most of the websites place it on the bottom) normal user tendency will be, to look at the bottom of the page (Footer). But, if you are ...


4

Stop using "user-scalable=no". Period. In the last 6 years, I cannot count the times that I've had to put away the iPhone and go to a desktop computer to examine something on a website because it simply wasn't visible and there was no way to increase its size because of this particular meta-tag. This is far and away the most useless tag. I wish it had ...


1

You could try presenting the primary hotel and alternate as cards, with the primary accommodation presented as the top card. Show some details of the hotels on each card. Label the primary hotel card "Primary hotel" or "planned accommodations" or something like that, and make the primary hotel card background color brighter than the secondary one. Label the ...


0

A simple solution would be to mention the hotel which is most popular in bookings OR the nearest hotel to the user's selected or current location. Below, you can have a drop-down or a button that mentions View 1 More Location. As far as a holiday feel is concerned, I would advise you to switch to a better interface and use images to your advantage. The ...


1

If the sub-categories are not more than 2 in each category then show it upfront, by placing category as title. This way you will not confuse the user and also you are not hiding the information. But if you have more category with sub-categories then you have to find a work around on IA.


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If there's no way to get around submenus, the key is to provide a clear visual difference between levels and making it clear which main menu the submenu corresponds to. There's probably a million different ways you could do that, but the most common tend to involve changes in: Indentation Color Font size, weight, or family Spacing/delimiters Casing In ...


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This article outlines the most common mobile navigation patterns and should help you choose the right navigation approach for your scenario: https://www.nngroup.com/articles/mobile-navigation-patterns/


2

Don't use pages. Instead, load more is more effective on small touchscreens, because it's easier to tap accurately and avoids page reloads. As for how many you should load, that same study proposes 15 to 30 items. Any more, and users start needing to scroll too far. Fewer, and users get annoyed that they have to keep tapping all the time. The study's images ...


1

I'm partial to still opening new tabs. The advantage to opening a new tab is allowing the user to fork their browsing session like the would on desktop. Most mobile browsers (at least Chrome) have the back button set up to close the new tab to maintain the linear flow for the user if that's how they're navigating.


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I def. recommend this option for the desktop version but not for mobile. Look at the attached image, the window gets really tiny whenever you attempt to input text into the field.


1

It's always better if you keep the explanation right under the filed for both desktop and mobile. In case you need long explanation, you can always include a title for the helper line and link it to another page or a popup. You'll get what I really mean by checking out this example from mailchimp. I use it and find it helpful.


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Add a U+FE0E VARIATION SELECTOR-15 after each chess piece to force them to render them as text. For reference, U+FE0F VARIATION SELECTOR-16 will force characters to render as emoji. U+270C ✌ U+270C U+FE0E ✌︎ U+270C U+FE0F ✌️ Further reading: Standard Variants on Unicode.org, The Secret Life of Variation Selectors on BabelStone



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