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Smashing Magazine published an article on mobile wayfinding that I think is pretty helpful: http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2014/10/13/wayfinding-for-the-mobile-web/ None of those solutions are wrong, but given the choice, I'd probably use the "nested doll" approach as my starting point. It's a familiar pattern on both iOS and Android and would eliminate ...


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Due to limited screen space, you should have it close after the user has made their selection. Because the user will have the ability to dig into the menu (and submenus), they will be able to see all their available options before selecting one. Once the user selects one, the odds of them wanting to immediately select another menu option are slim to none. ...


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I would keep it closed due to limited space. If you want to go back to the page you can open it again. But users are not that likely to mess that up and being forwarded to a new page would be pretty annoying if the first thing you need to do is close the hamburger menu to get it out of your way to start browsing. Here are some popular examples that close ...


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Your question does not stipulate how the user will deliver the desired information. I see 2 methods, physically delivering the card/ID to the recipient, and digitally providing the data. The latter doesn't fit your use cases, so I'll answer for the former. The answer is challenging because there are multiple ways to accept information inputs, but the ...


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Trying to stick to your original question: "Would I need a mobile website for iPhone as well as iPad?" That totally depends on your layout and/or your (your client's) preferences. You can either have a (desktop optimized) website and gracefully degrade it to fit your needs – or go the mobile first approach – or have seperate versions. And even if you decide ...


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Any web page has access to the same dialing capabilities as any mobile web site. Those same capabilities can be ignored/turned off when dialing isn't available. Same with touch events. But this is all part of the design of a responsive/adaptive web site. You detect the availability using javascript. I disagree with the opinion of the non-technical staff in ...


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nah, nothing says that you have to design with minimum specific resolution. nowadays, we should design for multi-resolution mobile device, especially android devices. The best way to design is you should prepare your website or apps to be viewed in different screen ratio (like 16:9, 4:3, 3:2, etc) make sure that your app/web layout looks good in any kind ...


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I second @dnbrv in the comments. Just do a one page checkout experience, and minimize the fields. Always keep in mind that any checkout experience is a stressful experience (need to put in sensitive information, need to get the address correctly, etc), and you need to do what ever it takes to make it an easy checkout experience. Amazon implemented an ...


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I agree with Roel in part that Cart Summary > Delivery > Payment is fine. I just wonder if you can make all 3 accessible at all time so it is sequential but you can jump back if you want? Something like this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups So if a user has finished the Cart section and hit 'next' or something ...


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One possible strategy is to try and apply more progressive disclosure patterns that allow you to show and hide information based on user actions. Some examples include: tooltips: but instead of showing it on a popup you would simply implement a collapse/expand accordion style of display area underneath or near the trigger. This is usually for small and ...



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