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62

You're looking at the problem from the wrong angle. A user could also open a different browser, or use a second device, which means you can't rely on the idea of opening tabs(and preventing it), nor on IP address. Your solution needs to be server-side. Signing them out would just annoy them. Either make it so your website show them the same game no matter ...


43

On any site is is not ideal to break a user's expectations. As a user expects to be able to navigate the internet with tabs in their browser, you shouldn't break it.


26

From the A/B Testing (based on the article posted by keiwes) we can infer the following: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups There seems to be a correlation between correctly identifying the hamburguer icon functionality and the age of the users. Hence from the usability perspective, you need to question yourself ...


19

If you're on mobile and you feel you need traditional style breadcrumbs to navigate then something probably went wrong with designing your site for mobile use - ie it's too complex (too deeply nested) for the type of usage and environment that mobile provides. Jared Spool wrote on ixda in response to a similar question Can't speak specifically to ...


19

Personally I'm a supporter of sites with a mix of the two. Fonts should keep the same size both in landscape and portrait. It should merely be distributed differently depending on the current screen width. As you've also showed in the mockup for A. I feel that also scaling the text is like surrendering to a notion that "-ok, we know the text is very ...


19

My company caters towards an older population, so we included text along with the hamburger icon. Here is an article that had similar results with the older population: http://mobile.smashingmagazine.com/2013/09/11/responsive-navigation-on-complex-websites/ Google defines a convention as "a way in which something is usually done, esp. within a particular ...


19

If you have a separate site for mobile and non-mobile then yes, most definitely yes, let them go to the full site to complete what they wish if it isn't offered on your mobile one. Mobile doesn't just mean 'people sat in a coffee shop for 2 minutes looking at their iPhone'. These days Mobile means 'anything that isn't a laptop/desktop' (and even that line ...


16

Mobile websites should not be mobile versions of desktop websites - they should be a service or product for mobile usage. That means that yes, if certain content isn't relevant 'on the road', or if its inclusion makes it harder to provide an interface that works better in a mobile context, you should consider chopping it. And remember, if needs be, you can ...


16

This is delicate, and should be a sound judgment by the designer. There is no right or wrong, neither is there a convention (yet) to rely on. But there are a few things to consider, like zooming in just widening the page, which I feel is useless. If I want to zoom I can snap-in on the text getting it in a more readable form (both in Landscape and Portrait ...


13

There are different approaches to device oriented design, and you can implement one of several design patterns to choose from. The first one that comes to mind is the fluid design, which (simply put) just reorganize the elements to a better view. Some, less important elements, are hidden as the screen width gets narrower and vice versa. Next is the ...


13

Though the left and right icons would give information that you can continue scrolling, another option is use a layout where only part of the images are visible and the user will have to scroll to the right to see them as given below: Another approach which I am not a fan of would be to use a horizontal scrollbar at the bottom which informs the user that ...


13

Mobile first means that you start your design process off by designing for mobile. Once you have that done, you can easily modify the design for pc. The main reasoning behind this is that if you voluntarily constrain yourself to mobile, you will be forced to make decisions about what is really important, and what you need to focus on. By doing that, you ...


12

No, targeting WebKit is not enough. The first thing to do is to consider there are two segments of the mobile market: touch-based and not touch-based. This affects how you design your mobile user experience. Thankfully, the touch-based ones are going to trend significantly toward WebKit (Android, iPhone and WebOS). The others are primarily going to be IE ...


12

Let me add a late answer: after the content has loaded, do not let rotations trigger breakpoints. If the user rotates the device accidentally, their most immediate task is to reorient themselves and re-find the content they were viewing or reading at the time of rotation. But a breakpoint trigger, the user is suddenly presented with an interface they don't ...


12

You are trying to imitate adding and removing weights to a bar. On a touch device, you can do precisely that. Just drag them on and off the bar: You can enhance this in many ways, but I think that as the main concept, it doesn't get simpler than this. UPDATE following OP update 1 - Not much that can be done about that... If it's a web app, it needs a ...


12

There is no most important factor in mobile applications, as each application has to make different tradeoffs in order do develop the best UX. It is however one of the more critical factors as it directly impacts almost every application. Other factors that may be more important are: aesthetics; correctness; simplicity; and similarity to known patterns.


12

James Foster of Exis Web did an interesting A/B test on the hamburger icon: Tests on mobile showed a difference, though not all that significant, when the icon was used with a border (so it looks like a button): Perhaps more interestingly, the A/B test seemed to more clearly indicate that desktop users don't understand the icon: I tested 4 ...


12

Google hangout has the same requirement as your application. You cannot do two hangouts at the same time. Yet Google does not shock the user by disconnecting the first call when a second call is attempted. Instead, you see an error message in the second call's window. Why don't you try the same approach?


10

Off hand, Option 1 sounds better for the reason you give –it’s easier and less error-prone to tap to advance to the next question than to swipe/scroll. The general rule is to use scrolling to avoid arbitrarily breaking up content. In your case, if you can only fit one whole question on the screen at a time, then you’re not being arbitrary. You may find some ...


10

Three big issues when you're considering how to deal with content on mobile devices, especially if you're trying to figure out how to re-prioritize content for different screen sizes or device capabilities. I've been calling this adaptive content, as a partner to adaptive design or responsive design. How is the content written? Truncation might work... if ...


10

Gracefully degrade your subnavigation or drop it by reiterating its contents on the index pages. It's true. Just look at the evidence below. Two great examples of responsive web design are Smashing Magazine and The Boston Globe. Ethan Marcotte himself was involved in the Boston Globe redesign. Smashing Magazine: Drop the Subnav Note in these screenshots ...


10

I've done some quick analysis of existing applications to see what they do in such a situation. Facebook - Red message saying 'no internet connection' Vine - Greyscale sad smiley saying 'couldn't load posts' Safari - Greyscale icon saying 'cannot open the page because your iPhone is not connected to the Internet Flipboard - Empty (Grey) containers with 'No ...


9

I think the decision between a single responsive site vs. multiple sites targeting different devices comes down to whether or not you are following LukeW's Mantra of 'design for mobile first'. If you're designing for mobile first, then it's almost trivial to reconfigure the layout/flow to also accommodate desktop use. There are many other advantage as ...


9

I would say that it depends on the site. You could categorise mobile websites into two categories: A bespoke mobile website / app that is a stripped-down version of the full site only offering the most appropriate content for mobile users A responsive website, or a desktop site rendered in a separate mobile 'template'. With the first type of site then ...


9

I've come across the same question a while ago and my company relayed on my opinion to solve the same problem, but I wasn't able to find hard data to use as a starting point. However, I found a paper by Raluca Budiu and Jakob Nielsen from the University of Cincinnati (http://uc.edu) about Usability of Mobile Websites. The page 79 mentions very briefly a ...


9

Something you could apply is a slide control, similar to that of answering a call or locking up the screen. If you use the entire width of the screen for the control the amount of unintentional votes could be kept to a minimum, and the action is performed in one operation/gesture. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


9

Jakob Nielson and a large group of other studies suggest scrolling is not a con. Users are acclimated. Put it into context. If you're sitting at a desk, the monitor is roughly 28 inches away vs. a mobile device that is 12 inches. Should it be larger if it's closer? Four years ago, Smashing Mag found the most popular body font size on the web was 13px. ...


9

We need to quit thinking "mobile friendly" and start thinking "device independent". Even mobile devices have resolutions and physical sizes once only found on desktop computers and some cannot be detected as mobile or not. You cannot point to any one width based on resolution where you can be sure it will fit most devices and, even then, that may all change ...


7

It would take more than hover states for UX designers to be able to treat mobile devices like desktop ones (and failing to celebrate their differences could be considered a mistake). To understand why, we have to define the terms and then consider the differences. Defining the terms What do we mean by 'Web' interaction and what might we mean by 'mobile' ...


7

No site is "100% perfect". Be realistic: sites iterate over time where you release, receive feedback, develop, release, etc. There is always room for improvement. That aside, you ask how to know when to release - when is good enough really good enough? User testing will be critical here (this is vastly different from getting your UX colleagues to offer ...



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