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82

A better modification of such a statment which I see being used is: 'A company_name employee will never ask for your password' This message alerts the user that if the person is asking for a password, there is something fishy and he should alert the concerned authorities immediately. With all the live chat functionalities that most industries are ...


58

"I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that." That scene from 2001: A space odyssey is a good example for why this can be a dangerous practice. Beware of anthropomorphising a computer to the point where the user starts ascribing malice to it. Error messages need to be non-personal to avoid the user feeling like the computer is complaining at them, or ...


54

Personalisation Igor. Content personalisation can be appropriate at times, like in an email or after login. Amongst a few, it makes the system appear more 'human', and can facilitate some personal 'bond' with the user. But one can argue that by attaching a name to a notification you won't achieve that (I see proper personalisation as real user-dependent ...


43

Most security breaches are from social engineering, and so telling someone that they should never under any circumstances give anyone their password is an attempt to increase security. I would suggest a statement more like: If anyone asks you for your password, you should assume they are a criminal and report it immediately! Idea provided by @Kaz As ...


37

There are two big problems, from an internationalization perspective: How sure are you that your Name data contains the name the user is called by? Getting your name data format correct is a classically difficult problem. As soon as you add name wildcards to your error messages, they will become much more difficult to translate to other languages. Without ...


23

It currently accounts for about 20% of the activity on the site. The fact that 20% of the activity on your site is private messaging indicates that your users consider private messaging to be of high value. So, you should be hesitant to remove it. Even if private messaging is not directly of benefit to your community, it still provides increased ...


21

Anything the user will take for granted should fade away. For example: Message has been sent after clicking "send" Item has been deleted after clicking "delete" Contact has been added after clicking "add" Items that should remain visible are mission only critical things like: Incoming call (someone is waiting for you on the other end and needs your ...


17

I vote A. I read the result/s initially as result per second. Result(s) seems more natural, but I would prefer the option were you'd detect if the number is larger than 1 and change result to results. Maybe take a look here: english.stackexchange here the (s) seems to be the standard. Another option is to put it like this: Matching results: 1 With ...


17

If you are writing prose, a . (full stop) is there to show a the end of a sentence so that you know when the next one starts. If you only have one sentence, then it isn't strictly necessary for clarity. Hence, if it's a short notification message of only one sentence, you can leave it out. That said you should keep to the style guides given for your ...


16

I'm going to give you a high level answer since everyone else is already tackling the "show one or two messages" part. Don't be one of those apps Instead, here are some counterquestions to possibly affect your design decisions: What percentage of users is going to encounter problems if they don't reboot? Is it worth nagging 100% of your users if <5% ...


15

The only place where you don't use a full stop is in titles (such as in the title bar of a window). In all other cases, you need proper punctuation. Compare it to a book: the title of the book does not end with a period, all sentences inside do end with punctuation. Except the titles of the chapters, which are titles again. I remember in elementary school ...


13

When the web was in its dawn in the early 1990's there where a lot of different animated gifs letting the user know the page visited was "under construction". There are numerous examples on any image search, such as this one: Since then, the web have evolved and changed a lot. The under construction sign isn't used and hasn't been used since the late ...


13

Scenario: Your friend's messenger has 'virus' and is sending messages to his contacts. You mark his virus's message as spam. Do you want this to also block your friend? Or, do you just want to mark his message as spam? You see, there are times when you just want to mark a message as spam since it is coming from a known contact. Ignoring an user should ...


12

Jakob Nielsen’s F-Shaped Pattern For Reading Web Content references an important tendency of users when reading websites: Users first read in a horizontal movement, usually across the upper part of the content area. This initial element forms the F's top bar. You want your user to see the notification, so the top area of the page within that top bar ...


12

Punctuation is used to reveal the structure of written text. A period separates sentences in a paragraph. All style guides call for no punctuation in captions, titles, and headings, with the exception of question and exclamation marks. From The Oxford Guide to Style. 2002. Oxford: Oxford University Press: Do not use full point in headlines, column ...


11

The most relevant research I could find on this topic is a little dated. Fundamentally, adding user names to error messages deals with humanizing an interface. In a study of using human faces as part of computer interface [1] (admittedly, a step well beyond just including user names), the researchers found that increasing the humanization of an interface ...


10

I was surprised to learn that teenagers share passwords much more than I expected. So maybe for some demographics, it is necessary to reinforce more secure behavior.


9

Perhaps you could use a balanced tree-like structure that grows outwards at the sides (alternately) as more people join the conversation. Colour code it in vertical strips which each start as a new voice enters - like a piece of colourised vertically annotated choral music (a fugue?). You could maybe tail off a strip once that voice has had its last say so ...


8

Error messages shouldn't go away on their own unless Errors were resolved by User's Input User wanted those error messages to be hidden by clicking a X which an error message may have. If error message is displayed and user makes the same mistake which produces the same error message for the second time, the error message can blink or have a brief color ...


7

If you are using English, then the most common way is option A. 100 matching result(s). However I would strongly discourage using this, as it makes it very difficult to internationalise your application. I would suggest finding a way of wording it that does not require a reference to a singular or plural noun. I would rather use: Matching results: ...


7

Other than the obvious answer: "re-write your app so it supports common user actions better" You could try manipulating the browser history using new development techniques (usually outside the scope of a UX answer). Otherwise, a JavaScript alert will only fire after the users have tried to leave the page for any reason, which might be confusing to them. ...


6

Science: I've read a study last year, saying that the younger generation is unable to differentiate between communication channels: they do remember what did they send to who, but they just can't remember how did they send it. A quick informal survey on 25-35 year old power users (geeks, hipsters, you know, what friends shall a developer have?) confirmed ...


6

I wouldn't store in the localstorage. Localstorage is mainly for cache only. Store on the server, bind the data to the username. You can loose localstorage data when reinstalling computer, upgrading browser or working from home. Use it only for browser-specific settings, if any. Most people expect user-name authenticated webapps to magically work from ...


6

(I edited the answer for the sake of clarity) Re-reading your question, it seems you are more after a way to classify messages in categories like Status, Warning and Error. To me those cannot be classified automatically, because knowledge of the business case is necessary to do so. You can maintain a matrix of classification that you will enrich over time. ...


6

Marking a message as spam and blocking a have different use cases. Spam is generic content that is sent to many people (usually advertising). The goal of marking something as spam is to let your system intelligently remove other identical (or similar) posts so that other members don't have to be presented with this. Gmail does an excellent job of this. ...


6

The evils of the modern information age. Chat programs, e-mail programs, and most non-SSL web pages transfer information back and forth in a clear text format. This means that it's non-encrypted and readable by anyone with access to the text. Even though the network your computer is connected to seems like a physical straight connection to the router or ...


6

Although 2001 SO is one of my favourite movie, here are a few things to keep in mind: Users don't like to read, the shorter the better. Kudos if it smarts and eventually witty. As a user, I would find quite redundant (and annoying) to have to read my name every 2 minutes. I'm already engaged in this 1 to 1 interaction with the interface. In a conversation, ...


6

Just put a global marker stating the fact Local Storage is being used: Actual placement depends on the application. It is also possible to show an explanation in order to let the user know what is actually going on.


5

There's a simple test: Is the action irreversible? Is the action executed the moment the checkbox is enabled? If the answer to both of them is "No" then a simple additional warning text in the label will suffice. In all other cases, change the program's logic so that it would be "No".


5

This example is perhaps less about being short and more about being informal and what many call 'design for delight' ( http://52weeksofux.com/post/531355592/design-for-delight ) which is an interesting topic in and of itself. That said, your question is about the right length of phrasing to use. The answer is typically 'use enough to communicate what you ...



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