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1

Drill down means you show only one menu at a time. It brings you further down the menu structure. An example is the iPod menu: Or see this working example in jQuery. A hierarchical multi-level menu is more like a dropdown or accordion menu where the whole submenu structure is visible: Accordion example: Or as dropdown menu: An example in bootstrap


1

The answer is right next to where you pointed in the screenshot. The yellow button. You want to emphasize a menu item because it is something different or new, you can let it stand out by adding a color or border around it, giving it some sort of a ghost-button feel while it's still "just" part of your topmenu. It won't be annoying either, because it won't ...


5

There's is a lot of research around that explains the way a reader's eyes naturally flow when reading, so you may find some of that useful. For example, you may get some insight from: http://vanseodesign.com/web-design/3-design-layouts/ How much of that applies to a User Interface is always open to debate. Your question doesn't specify whether you're ...


1

Considering the purpose of this screen is to require "users to identify whether they are a teacher or parent," one approach would be to spell it out in plain english, simply say: To continue, please select what best describes you: [ I am a Parent ] [ I am a Teacher ] This approach is a bit wordy, but makes it very clear what is expected of the ...


1

IMHO you do not need the label 'please pick from the list below' . You already have a title "User Selection" and the two options right down below, so the action to be taken by the user is clear enough, and you eliminate the clutter . And also I suggest you change the title a little bit : the user here is in fact selecting the " user mode" , and "user ...


3

Without seeing the context within which your user selection choice appears, any answer you get will require a bit of guesswork on our behalf. However, at first glance, I have the following to offer: It seems relatively clear what you want the user to do, assuming this is located somewhere the user is drawn to. If it's lost on a busy page, then the user ...


6

Forget mobile breakpoints, there's no phone and tablet sizes outside marketing. Breakpoints should follow the content, not the screen size. As a simple example, let's consider the menu: Home | Products | Contacts Do you think you should ever provide a mobile menu? Do you really want to stick three elements in a hamburger menu? They can probably fit ...


2

I think that the best is to call the context menu by its name. Not only this is the correct term, but it's also self-explanatory. Your documentation should make sure at the very beginning that the user knows how to make the context menu pop out (right click, double tap, etc.). If it's an in-app documentation, explain the way to do that in the current OS. If ...


2

In an online or in-app documentation, it is possible to detect the OS and to tailor the message for the right OS. Though it might be wise to display a manual switch of the target OS if a user might check the documentation on their mobile devices while actually working on a PC/Mac. For a default if OS-detection fails, my experience is that the ...


0

In short, you're right Most users just want to navigate one obvious step at a time. If you give them a menu that feels like it needs to be "closed," then they don't want to have any unnecessary actions bundled into their obvious prompt: "close". I think most would agree that your intuition is correct - allowing navigation simultaneous to closing a pop-up ...


2

I would just have the div closed. I think most people would not even think about where they are clicking, as long as it is outside of the popup. It can confuse them a lot to suddenly end up on a different page, in my opinion. So I think your take on this is correct.


3

Can you? Sure. Should you? That comes down branding. There are multiple opinion pieces out there related to the use of "and" vs. ampersand. The question has been asked over on English.SE before and has a fair number of very good answers: When to use & instead of “and” Grammatically it is generally seen as less formal. Unless space is a consideration, ...


2

I would not recommend to use any "AND" or "&", instead trying to find one level up terminology (Ex: reports) will be better. I would like to ask; Why do you need to combine logs and statistics into one section? Why do users visit this section, what is the main intent? These questions can help you to find generic menu item terminology.


5

The good and bad of bottom nav Bottom nav was a great idea when Apple first came out with it. Steve was laser-focused on one-handed usability. The bottom nav was designed to accommodate fast and convenient view switching where the mobile use case seemed to demand it. Unfortunately, bottom nav is a hierarchy nightmare when used for an app's main info ...


0

It depends on how frequently your users will use the navigation links. If its rarely then hamburger menu is ok. Otherwise top navigation will still do the work but the left most buttons will be a bit harder to tap (see image below). All 3 variants have their advantages and disadvantages, but the important thing is to choose the one that will fit best ...


2

One line answer to this is the Usability of choosing that position. When you hold your mobile in hand, your thumb immediately gets into action and the bottom position is easily accessible to it than the top. In the era of large screen devices it's difficult to hold the phone in hand and access the navigation placed on top. Which is why Apple has changed ...


3

I think you should reconsider the bottom navigation: Bottom navigation is very well established in mobile apps, far more so than top navigation, and there is good reason for this. In most cases i disagree with your point about incorrect information hierarchy - the content takes prime visual position in the interface, and the navigation is simply a tool for ...


8

In my experience, I tend to use ampersands in any title, and the word "and" in sentences and other body content. So in your case, I would likely use "Logs & Statistics" in the menu. In my opinion, visually it makes the titles look more concise. This has the additional benefit of saving precious real estate in something like a navigation menu as ...


0

I have been trying going through some discussions regarding when and how to implement navigation within a 'dashboard' like page, so here are some of the considerations we have taken into account, which will hopefully help you come up with the right answer: Length of page: this is where the top nav is good for long pages, as the side nav takes up room down ...


0

Rename the "Cut" operation of the device to "Slice" or something similarly effective but not confusingly part of cut/copy/paste lexicon.


0

I prefer to reserve the top-menu for the highest-level interactions. Things like: getting to the 'home' of the website, switching to a totally different workflow, accessing the user profile, etc. These activities are less-common, and users will intuitively scan the very top of the page for these higher-level activities. The side-menu can be more useful for ...


0

As your question highlights, we can't always live in a perfect world. Sometimes there are just a lot of points in the navigation. I've had to deal with this in both consumer and enterprise contexts, and I'm happy to say I've found a simple solution that works. For the main nav, stick with the well-proven horizontal top bar or tabs. For the subsections, use ...



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