New answers tagged

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From a design standpoint, however, drop-down menus are an excellent feature because they help clean up a busy layout. If structured correctly, drop-down menus can be a great navigation tool, while still being a usable and attractive design feature. drop-down navigation menus can be user-friendly. Recently Jacob Nielsen the results of his recent drop-down ...


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In 99% of the cases you don't need to keep multiple parent items expanded at once. Moreover, it is advisable not to do so, as you don't want the user to get confused about her current location on your website and eventually get lost. And yes, there are scenarios in which you would want to have all the items expanding without collapsing their siblings. Such ...


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"It doesn’t matter how good your website is if users can’t find their way around it." - By jerrycao Continuing with my answer posted just a day before. I stated that collapse menu's are better, and also gave some valid reasons. Note: Please read my previous answer(linked above), come back and continue here. Now talking about your case, I would ...


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Provide them shortcuts for expand/collapse all, then let them organize it from there (unless there's some explicit reason for them not to be able to expand multiple siblings concurrently).


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I've found that letting users choose when tabs open and closed is best, so I would leave it up to the user to collapse one menu, even when following a link in another menu. A scenario describing why would include users who might be navigating through different parts of the site multiple times. If I want to go to the pratius page, then artius, them to ...


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The problem with patterns is that it’s hard to stand out when you’re doing the same thing everyone else is doing. But you don’t want to deviate too far from functionality with something as important as navigation. You need to find that sweet spot right between familiarity and creativity. While thinking outside the box is usually a good idea, but there are ...


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There are no hard and fast rules. You may pick and choose however you feel best fits your application style and needs. However, there are general guidelines that each mobile platform proposes to enhance the consistency and usability of apps on their platform. You may choose to follow these guidelines if you wish to make your app "fit in" better within a ...


0

This relates as much to UX patterns as it does to operating system patterns. When you learn a bit of Swift, you realize it's not about "hiding the bottom navigation", but actually about using a different form of presentation for the content you're about to show. If you're designing for iOS, Apple describes it best in the iOS Human Interface Guidelines: ...


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Both are traditionally known for displaying More Options You can think of them as Ellipsis that refer to un-finished menu and hence clicking on it shows you the entire menu, finishing it. On Android, it is referred to as Overflow Menu On Apple and iOS devices it is referred to as More Options Menu Technically these are used to display Secondary options ...


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I agree that those buttons look like they're not able to accept any user interaction when their alpha values are lowered. I'd suggest not changing the alpha values at all. Instead, scale up the button that is selected, and scale down the other buttons. For example: Or, as suggested by @BrettEast, implement some kind of checking system. For example:


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I think that your concern is completely valid, especially if this is a user's introduction to the app. As Steve Krug points out, not making the user think is a fundamental part of User Experience design. Letting the user learn through trial and error can be okay, but not when it goes against what they traditionally already know. You're using an existing ...


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Top or left menu, there is no absolute answer. When it comes to designing for users, context is king. A navigation that works well in one context may not fit well for another context. To conclude which navigation is best for you application, it's important to understand the different context. Where the top and left navigation works. scanning A left ...


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What you could do is group your categories by major themes and use a similar style as bestbuy.com where categories appears in a dropdown and when you go above one category, the window expands and shows other relevant categories based on that theme.


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While I agree with @dan1111, one alternative, I can think of is a Chris Coyer's implementation for big drop down. You can see the example below: https://css-tricks.com/examples/LongDropdowns/ But honestly that would be an unfamiliar behavior for the user and that cannot happen inside a side menu. The other thing is sidr.js which you could see been used ...


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It allows better accessibility, likewise those +/- buttons are highly inaccesible, except for users with high mouse dexterity (*). It serves also as notifier of what "default" action is when hitting enter (for directory, "expand" is default, for file "open"). Also power users are not likely to touch those +/- icons at all, but simply rely into TAB, ENTER, UP,...


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Alan Cooper, in his classic interface design book, About Face, speaks directly to this question. He points out, as you have, that there are multiple distinct techniques for issuing instructions to a program. He terms these, collectively, "command vectors." Menus are one type of command vector, as are toolbar "buttcons" (his term for toolbar buttons labeled ...


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It’s a Historical Leftover Speaking specifically about the Windows File Manager, the answer is in the history of its UI. Look at screenshots of the older Windows file manager, and you’ll see there are no +/- icons. Instead, there was a pulldown menu command (in the Tree menu, I think) to expand/collapse. Double-clicking and later the context menu were ...



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