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1

Last I checked, Samsung was the leader in terms of both innovation and devices sold, which would mean Samsung is not violating the trend, it is the trend.


0

If the menu is the master section of a master-detail pattern, it should probably be on the left in English and adjusted to the right in RTL languages. This is because if follows the direction of reading and the hierarchy people are used to in that locale. Besides, putting RTL text in a menu that slides from the left is a bit weird... would you align it ...


1

We take the phone with our preferred hand :) IMO, as they are more right-handed persons than left-handed in the world AND because a back button is one of the most used button, some manufacturers might consider that it's more appropriate to place it on the right. Indeed, it would involve less effort for a right-handed person to push it with such a position ...


2

The primary differences are : The "Hamburger" icon gets displaced in the pushing-menu-to-the right instance. Incase of an overlay, the icon still remains at the same place. For some users, especially users who have not yet caught up to the functionality of a hamburger(even though it is existent since the 80's and was developed by Xerox), the experience of ...


1

They are both indicating how you can get back to the other content (before you opened the menu). This is generally known as affordance. Since both methods leverage the user's ideas about how object should behave in the real world, they can be considered intuitive. I wouldn't say one is inherently better than the other, but if I was designing an application I ...


0

I would like to share with you this ab test results http://exisweb.net/menu-eats-hamburger


1

The independent web-publishing firm Exis has been engaging in a number of A/B tests measuring the success of the "list" (or sometimes called the hamburger) icon. Their last test was statistically significant to start drawing some conclusions. Some of their key findings: The word "Menu" performed about 20% than the "list icon." Android were 3x less likely ...


0

If there's a lot of complex interactions where the admin needs to handle but the user doesn't, then what bzav suggested of having two separate views: admin and user is preferable. If there isn't or the devs can't support two separate sections, you can try putting in permission based controls directly on the page. I've worked on a previous project that ...


3

http://thenextweb.com/dd/2014/04/08/ux-designers-side-drawer-navigation-costing-half-user-engagement/?utm_content=buffer044a9&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer http://www.exquisitetweets.com/collection/lukew/2919 http://exisweb.net/mobile-menu-abtest The hamburger icon and it's affordance has been hot topic for ...


4

Actually, my company recently did a bunch of field research, and the results were completely mixed, even across age and experience -- most knew of the symbol, but most misinterpreted its meaning. We hypothesized this happens because of how the symbol is used across larger platforms such as Google Chrome and Facebook, i.e., it's not always used to mean the ...


1

If you are referring to the Hamburger button, then I would say yes, it's fairly known now as a metaphor for a menu on mobile devices, and thus making it's way to the desktop (responsive) web as well. As for the medium, they can afford quite innovative design because their target audience is internet savvy. The pattern is certainly unintuitive.


2

Is it absolutely necessary? No. However, does it make sense? I think so. As you said, you are providing "the ability to open the game's Main Menu." A main menu takes the user out of the current context. If it was a "map menu" or an "actions menu" then I think you could more easily restrain the context to that of only what is capable at that time. However, ...


2

Within the context of the map and the users' behaviors within the map navigation, providing a link to manage combat abilities seems irrelevant from a UX perspective. Almost a distraction. I would suggest keeping the interaction focused on what the user is most likely there to accomplish in that space. Perhaps, allowing a user to launch into combat mode from ...


1

About the menu: I agree with Dave, that you could perhaps explore possibility to have it vertical, albeit you could gain more with simply restructuring and hoping you can fit all menu items in one row and still have only 2 levels. However, another alternative would be to have the top navigation contain only the most primary and sought after links that most ...


1

I would entertain thinking slightly differently and exploring a vertical side navbar. Perhaps, provide some organization to the navigation links. Two or three categories may help the user better digest your offered nav topics. Also, the text does not need a shadow, the white on dark blue pops for pleasant reading. I hope this helps.


0

I've always problem with mega drop down menus, because they force user to choose from a lot of alternatives at the beginning of the whole process of interacting with the website. In my opinion menu at the first nav level should consist of descriptive but the general names, next we should drill down into more detailed information. Mega drop down menu is ...


1

I found a few good articles on this topic, one is a study (it's a little bit older) suggesting that perhaps more menu items isn't a bad thing. Although it mentions the importance of items being clearly labelled, and I guess this is the challenge if you are reducing size. If there's too many items to fit and it's essential that they are present, how about a ...


2

Yes it is bad practice. You will limit the user in quickly scanning the menu items, as they have to read the entire label. Try grouping them in one label name, include an extra name you want people to see that before clicking on it (e.g. search) You might consider the following list: - Visitors - Sales - Navigation & search - Settings In case you ...


3

Out of a related discussion which started on Quora, Geoff Alday dug a little deeper into the origins of the icon itself and discovered that Norm Cox is the man credited with designing the icon for the Xerox Star personal workstation, which was introduced in 1981. In an e-mail conversation between Cox and Alday, Cox reveals how the icon came about and the ...


0

From what I understand, you want to put a legal notice that only relates to the "add account" action. A simple fix would be to add more visual separation with a line or different background colors for these two related but different sections.


0

I agree with the above - there is enough room to put both those elements on the left, provided they have adequate clear space around them. I wouldn't add a thin bar to divide them as you suggestion, as this just exacerbates the issue by adding in more elements. I'm not sure why you think having the menu hamburger on the right is awful. I think it would work ...


0

Placing hamburger icon and back button on the left side of the header in iOS make sense when you want to group all navigation functions in one place. On the right side of the header there are displayed other functions like editing or filtering. Suppose that user on one screen could: go back, see all menu categories (hamburger icon), search and filter ...


1

Well, there are at least two solutions coming to my mind, maybe one of them could be helpful for you: 1 Placing back button and humburger icon on the left side - it's not a bad idea, I use a few apps which provide this solutions and I don't encounter any problems with clickable area. I suppose even clumsy finger user could click right button. Placing ...


2

On the one hand, controls on the bottom right are easier to target with the right thumb. On the other hand, hamburger buttons, also known as off-canvas menus, are conventionally positioned in the upper left. So the question is, "Which is more important, ease of targeting or cultural convention?" Let's see what Don Norman has to say: "A convention is a ...


0

You could use a variation of the Multi-Toggle with Active Parent Links Design pattern. Perhaps sticking your Parent links left, while placing your expandable menu items to the right of the menu structure. http://codepen.io/micahgodbolt/full/mnLiF I do think that sticking parent menu links to the bottom of the screen could be problematic considering how ...



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