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Open vs close questions Children Here an advice you'd find sometimes with child education: It is better to provide a child with a specific set of options, instead of leaving it to them to work out the options themselves. For example, instead of asking your child "What would you like to eat?" ask her "Would you like an omelette or rice?". The ...


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Typically these kind of text-based (command line) workflows will have prompts, a la (y/n)?, that make it pretty clear what the application expects. I would say to stick with this familiar pattern. Under the hood you could account for case differences or complete spelling of Yes or No (just look at the first letter), but I wouldn't take that too far ...


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If possible I suppose it would probably be user friendly to give at least a suggestion of what answers are expected / accepted. This could be as little as [y/n]. Otherwise after my opinion you would probably run the risk that users wouldn't answer at all since we're so used to clicking buttons. But that might of course depend on the context, the type of ...


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I would generally say it depends whether which of the following is more important: Make it easier/faster to proceed Stop the user proceeding accidentally If 1 then go for your second option, if 2 then go for your first option. Regardless of which one you pick, provided you stick to the same throughout your application then I would say it doesn't matter. ...


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I totally agree with @tohster. Additionally, I believe there is no sparkling music software right now. I personally do not prefer to use any kind of music software instead of using Youtube or else. This generally relies on unintuitive interface designs of those applications. To change people's habits is not that easy, whereas to prefer video networks to ...


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Generally, I think the entire iTunes UX team should be fired or replaced. I think your observations are spot on. There is little consistency and a litany of terrible UX choices in the current versions of iTunes. The issues include: Inconsistent placement of controls (grid breaking, unintuitive placement) Inconsistent control sizes and indicators (a drop ...


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Question: How much additional information is required for the custom option? If you can get away without using a dialog, I would recommend doing so because it can potentially interrupt the process of managing the rest of your properties. Assuming settings on a web form, consider this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq ...


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Dots, in this form, are communicative of either loading, or progression. As suggested above, a drop arrow would work well. Perhaps, consider an angled arrow as this also hints at the path new content will appear in.


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Most of the user would not know what ... means. Try this


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Why don't you use a small drop-down arrow here? This icon is ok, but seems that some dialog box/window will be opened by clicking this. Yes you are right, this icon is used to display More options.


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They almost make as much sense as the word "more" ... As with any icon, I personally have taken to do what you're doing everywhere else in that design: use an icon with a word next to it. "More ..." Or "Menu" followed by the hamburger icon. Alternatively, use a down arrow. That one has worked for years, and is still seeing heavy use across (web based) ...


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I am afraid that the UX world depends on which your users are and therefore the true answer is that there are no solutions to your problem. There are only costs and benefits on choosing either one design or the other but this depends on the users. You should get in touch with them by doing ux research in order to get the proper insights that will guide your ...


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Your intuitions have merit -- if it is confusing to you as a developer to have two menu items of the same name, rest assured that it would also be confusing to your users. In this case, the word "View" or "View All" can be used to enumerate this action, for instance: Contacts View All Additional Fields Sub Category I would also hesitate to make your ...


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You basically have a two-level navigation hierarchy. That's not unusual. Let's start with the Mobify approach: The Mobify approach is reasonable if you want to constrain users to a single panel, or if you think users will want to jump around the hierarchy frequently so they won't have the patience for a slide-in animation. It's also useful if you want ...


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You're trying to create what's probably the single most common mobile design pattern, namely drilldown navigation :). You're saying that when you click the arrow, the submenu slides on top of the current one, and from your mockup it appears that the top item leads back to the original menu. In other words, when you click an item, you see the list of the ...


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What do you have in the main screen? Do you already have a Navigation Menu or bottom Tab bar. If not you could use one of these to show those context specific items like dashboard, sales report, team viewer. User can switch his pharmacy or use general items in menu. Thus non frequent items hde in side menu and context specific but always needed items are in ...


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Drop downs hide information that should readily be accessible. So in this case you could have a horizontally ordered list if the options are less in number say 5 or 7 at the maximum. Consider this to be your primary navigation. The one selected should maintain a different state so as to indicate the user where they are. Use a color to indicate this grey ...


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Check out Google Analytics and ExtJS. Both of them solve the multiple filters problem. See especially the size column here: http://dev.sencha.com/extjs/5.0.0/examples/kitchensink/#grid-filtering


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Context is everything. Maybe it matters, maybe it doesn't. The fact that it's a portfolio site has no real bearing in and of itself. Generically speaking, should you retain the hamburger menu on larger screens? Traditionally we haven't. But it's becoming an increasingly popular option. Some sites that retain the hamburger menu even on large screens: ...


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The hamburger menu... I'm torn. The hamburger menu decreases discoverability because it hides what the user is more than likely going to use to... well... discover At a glance, the user can tell what's where and how to find what they are looking for. Being hidden underneath someplace isn't ideal for scanability. Having said that, stay away from keeping it ...


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I agree with the answer and comments above, it's like UX 101 and I won't argue with that but... let me add a different view to consider. You say this is for a portfolio. Portfolios are meant to display your work, but also who you are. It's a way to tell the world "Hey, I'm me. And additionally, I can do all of this!". Personally, I know what are the basics ...


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It likely depends on what navigation controls you have on your page. If pagination is the only way you can navigate, then for sure having pagination on both top and bottom would be helpful. If you have filters or faceted search, then that will just clutter up the screen. Users have better ways of finding what they need. They're more likely to refine their ...


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Show it at the top. In my experience on ecomm product grids, users are more likely to visit subsequent pages if you tell them up front that they exist. It gives them awareness of the number of available options. It also allows them to jump ahead quickly if they already know the first pages doesn't have what they're after. Granular control when necessary ...


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The fact is it really depends on your users. I think it's become more and more common that users know to do that but that is generalizing a bit. Best thing to is user test it. From a purely usability stand point, the ideal case is definitely to include it however there's often design and space considerations. I would look to see if you can trim down on ...


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I'd first question whether you need global navigation on mobile. I'm often asked to implement global navigation on projects because project leads have a belief that users want to 'hand out' in the application and be able to navigate from one point to any other point. But in terms of actual usage, that's not now most people interact with most ...



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