Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

Here is some advice for you: First, confirm to your client that you respect his/her opinion. Don't argue! Second, clarify with him/her that you create a product for users, not for yourselves. Third, organize usability testing and invite your client to participate. Then, create two prototypes, one the way your client wanted, and other the way you want. ...


4

I think this is a good example for asking the question "What does the client need?" vs. "What does the client want?". So if I understand your question correctly, your client wants to present two websites under one address and probably also under one one design. Whether this is a good idea or not is not within the scope of my answer – for now I just try to ...


15

To expand on Tohsters answer, one hamburger menu is already detrimental enough so adding a second one is only going to confuse matters more. If the client cannot be persuaded to follow other avenues then it's probably best to start looking at ways to make the best of a bad situation. (this blog post expands on this ...


0

My two cents: Two hamburger or shall i say two same navigation model is definitely confusing. First of all it takes up precious real estate that to when we are dealing with small screen. Second, navigation is an important aspect and when the user is shown two redundant ways to navigate, she will get confused to which one should be followed. No amount of ...


10

This is a terrible idea You're right to be suspicious. One hamburger already sucks... Hamburger menus don't test very well to begin with. Here is Apple's UX lead on the subject, and more articles here and here, but to summarize: They hide links and content from the user instead of presenting the user with direct options. The hamburger icon is ...


5

YES You're point out that there is a surplus of criticism and a scarcity of alternatives to the hamburger menu. Background Hamburger menus have been criticized because: They hide links and content from the user instead of presenting the user with direct options. The hamburger icon is placed at the top of the screen where users tend to ignore it. ...


0

Maybe the style should be in <style /> ? CSS: .prev:before { content: "« "; } .next:after { content: " »"; } HTML: <a class="prev" href="prev.html">previous</a> <a class="next" href="next.html">next</a> Result would be something like: « previous next »


3

They are different terms Callout is an older term that dates to paper-based design before the web. Callouts are used in design to draw attention to or label something. Here are some callouts labeling the orientation of a part: There are many ways to style callouts, but usually there is a line or an arrow to indicate the subject of the callout. Here ...


2

There may be some legitimate uses for a quad menu pattern though here are the reasons why I would almost always opt for the accordion pattern. 1. The buttons are too close to one another Even if the little squares that light up aren't the target of the expand/collapse operation the four tiny root level words seem too close to each other for high accuracy ...


0

This menu looks like a nightmare to me but I could see it living in a 3D modeling app. Is there any benefit to your users seeing all the open menus at once? As in, are they choosing 'attach' or maybe 'select' or 'divide' but need to see those options at the same time? If not, I would suggest a standard context menu with 4 main options, 1 for each sub-menu. ...


3

In Windows menus can have either commands (Print) or options (View => Large Icons). This is what Windows Design Guidelines for menus says about using bullets and checkmarks: Menu items that are options may use bullets and checkmarks. Commands may not. And on using icons: Consider providing menu item icons for: The most commonly used menu ...


3

On standard Windows, icons and checkboxes share in the same column. Thant means you cannot have both a checkmark and an icon at the same time. The following image is from a Delphi 32bit EXE, wrapping the standard Windows API - images seem to take precedence to checkmarks: I have seen (rarely) programs with two such columns, showing checkmarks to the left ...



Top 50 recent answers are included