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11

For branding purposes! It’s much easier to get the layout you want creating an image in your favorite design tool, than to tweak the supposed to be character with letter-spacing, margin, border, padding and font-size, which may look awful, if users zoom in to the site. You have much more control of an image than a font character. Image by Nick Meloy ...


43

Using text rather than an image is good design when displaying text. This allows the user to interact with the text as text, doing things like copy and paste, or using alternative methods of reading the site content. However, this menu button is not actually text. It has nothing to do with the meaning of that text character (a mathematical symbol meaning ...


0

I agree this is somewhat problematic. A user may expect a menu, but be taken to a page without warning. Or the reverse might happen: they won't realize that there are subcategories to some of the menu items, so they won't discover all of the content of your site. You should be able to solve this with visual cues to differentiate the two types of icons. ...


2

As a rule - stick to convention! This means that your first image is the correct one. Users don't have to understand your way of navigation, they know from other implementations how a treeview-left side navigation works! This is true even if you hav a lot of sub categories and items in sub categories. Never ever break existing convention, unless you have a ...


0

It sounds like the users know what they are looking for so the idea of having to add filters that in-turn also have filters seems unnecessary. For example, if a user knows they want to see Chihuahuas, a parakeet, and tabby cat only. They shouldn't have to first add the dogs group, then filter to the type of dog, add the bird group, then filter to that type ...


0

You could go with your design but I have following suggestion for add on:- You could show a search bar with options like CAT A, CAT B, CAT C which are your categories. Now As user will select one of the above categories then you could show a one more search bar just below your previous bar which would be showing all option's related to the category ...


1

I think if the context is easily understood, disabling without hints of why, is fine. Remember Balloon help in MacOS? Apple encouraged us to write balloon help for disabled items way back from 1991 and forward. Microsoft did not. But as said above, tool tips only work if you have the hover event, not for touch. For more complex scenarios, explanation why ...


0

I have a similar issue I'm working on at the moment. Is there anything you can do to predict preset/popular views? i.e. View 1 shows columns X, Y, Z View 2 shows columns A, B, C etc or Show All Dogs Show All Cats There comes a time when it's best to let the user download it and do their work on Excel rather make the interface too complicated to work on. ...


0

I'm not sure that a look ahead is the most usable and fast solution. I think if you only have 10 items in each cat you can easily have this as a drop down list. So my solution is have three drop down menus.


0

The bottom screen approach works very well for mobile applications due to the hands ergonomics. Often used functions would fit best in the bottom corner, to be reachable with the thumb at once. There are some very good videos from Luke Wroblewski on youtube, especially this one which touches your challenge (see min 1:10): Luke Wroblewski on navigation on ...


1

Here are a couple of alternatives I could think of : An alternate option you can look at is the overflow menu option as shown below This would allow you to stack the additional content in an overlay which can be pulled up as needed and would not be the primary navigation but more like the secondary navigation. Dropbox provides a whole list of options ...


3

The English example above isn't a "menu" - it's a numbered list of arbitrary foods arranged alphabetically. It wouldn't make sense as a "menu" in a restaurant even in English. A customer who wants a sandwich would likely be confused/frustrated trying to find all the various sandwich options scattered alphabetically across the page. Since people don't tend ...


1

Since it is a menu, you can group the dishes by the way they are cooked. If you have different menu for breakfast/lunch/dinner, you can order the the menu by the types first and then the way they are cooked. It may be better to keep the popular ones at the top, and mark them as popular, so more customers will order them. In my opinion, you don't necessary ...


1

I think it depends on the type of restaurant, the type of customers and the variety of dishes that you have. Some of the reasons why these are important considerations are: You can order by the cost if people are price conscious/sensitive You can group and order by the type of dishes (e.g. breakfast, lunch, dinner, all-day, entree, dessert items) if the ...


0

As I saw your english menu I don't see a point of sorting in Chinese word. So you could simply put the words in ordering of their meaning in english. One more thing if their was a category too then you could have arranged your food item category wise similarly Chinese words would be categorised in that way. Rest your phonetic order sounds good.


0

After giving this question some thought , I would arrange the chinese words according to its Hanyu Piyin which is the official phonetic system for transcribing the Mandarin pronunciations of Chinese characters into the Latin alphabet Example of Hanyu Piyin


0

Rather than doing a vertical expansion of items, perhaps try a more layer-based approach could help simplify. Rather than showing a long list of items, you could showcase a "stack" of sorts which allow the user to track where they were while seeing the options relating to their selection. View an example: ...



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