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What a thoroughly confusing widget - a search field which contains a drop-down tree control which is being used to filter by facet . This will be difficult to make keyboard enabled because you need to: expand the drop-down Navigate the folders Select a folder Get out the widget It will be easier for everyone (mouse and keyboard) if you created two ...


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Exis ran an A/B test on this topic. In his case the result was that the text menu with a border (making it very obvious that it's a button which you press to view the menu) worked best. Who would've figured ;) Full article: http://exisweb.net/mobile-menu-abtest


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I suggest the alternate way of providing the hamburger menu is the usage of floating menu button or tabs which will help the user to see the options upfront and not using the whole real estate.This will increase the efficiency as well.


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Is generating the report a major action from this tool, or a minor sub-feature? If it's a major action that's a primary purpose, then I'd strongly suggest putting the tools to do so in a very obvious place. If they're not needed once entered, then they can go away at that point, or have their visual impact reduced in some way... but if a user HAS to enter ...


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I would suggest not to hide important things like your required options. But to answer your question I have some ideas for you: Modal Infobox Show a little yellow infobox on top of the page containing some sentence like "Don't forget the options" followed by your icon. This box can fadeout after 2 seconds. Blinking Icon Make your icon blink for 2 or 3 ...


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Nice. Looks real clean. You have probably thought about this - I would also suggest being able to see where the user is arriving from. If I am arriving from the parent layer, and arrive to the child layer, I would perhaps add a hint at the top, of the parent layer that has been selected to orientate the user.


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I think users tend to relate better with what they can see at a glance..They get frustrated when they have to find features etc..Maybe it's not a bad thing to show the options on the page but hide some of the fields in an accordion when they click it expands.


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Two usable options come to mind. 1. Accordion menus 2. Sliding panels


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I create a little prototype to deal with this situation on devices with little space. You can find it here http://5rsg1w.axshare.com/ First you show your users a Menu-Button Then the first level navigation apear After clicking on one of the link the user will see the second navigation Then the user can click on the link 1 or on one link of the second level ...


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Can you elaborate more ? Are you seeking an answer from user-experience/programming perspective ? If programming, then you should search for three column layout design such as This or This Additionally, if you really want to see more creative and clean design of the sidebar while learning how to structure your web application and other great ...


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I think it would not hurt to add some sort of a search box - experienced users could just type what they need and only matching nav items would pop up.


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I would investigate a combination of a "mega menu" and in each section have the navigation listed in the footer. This way, as the user navigates the various pages in a given section, having read top to bottom, they can navigate to the next page using the bottom footer. Footer would have each of the sections listed horizontally and level 2 subpages listed ...


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Lea, instead of low contrast for the first and last tab, you can hide arrows. just my 2 cent, https://au.pinterest.com/pin/180284791312274083/ instead of showing complete tab, I hide half the first and last 'navigation tab' so that user can understand/curious there are more links. It is not a big issue, but just sharing an option. (*sorry for the link, i've ...


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Something that is commonly done is that if you want to use tabs, have it scale responsively down to a certain break point and then make the tabs become an accordion menu. For example for mobile and tablet it would be an accordion menu and then above 768px it would break out and become an enlarged tab menu.


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Thanks to a colleague at work I've finally found a solution : The source link : https://material.angularjs.org/latest/demo/tabs


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Congratulations - you have discovered one of the major challenges with Tabs :-) One part of the challenge is based on how you construct the Tab (I am assuming this is HTML), e.g. if you use CSS to set the width of the tab you will have problems (it is better not to set a width and let the container adopt its width based on its text content). If you are ...


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Yea! This approach will work because its obvious what you are trying to do :) You are even using the particular color of the navigation as the background color. Nice move. Maybe consider dimming or decreasing the saturation of the other menu options when the user is navigating through a particular parent/menu option? If you want to read about mobile ...


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Show only options that are applicable for all selected objects, otherwise users will be very confused and make mistakes. This is the standard behavior in almost all applications, and it is an expected behavior. To make your list more usable, you may provide them with a type sorting, so that users will easily select all items of one type and apply an option ...


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Most of the websites probably choose a horizontal header because it is commonly considered that this visual organization of website elements is more consistent with human perception. However, an outside the norm approach, when used correctly, can become a memorable experience, thanks to its rare occurence. It is not important if the navigation menu is a ...


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Consider these 2 thoughts: A) Many users will have a wide screen monitor. So for them the horizontal space is not really an issue. Instead the vertical space is where the premium is at. B) Secondly, your side menu can easily collapse or slide in/out, thus effectively saving you the horizontal space you are concerned about.


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From a design standpoint, however, drop-down menus are an excellent feature because they help clean up a busy layout. If structured correctly, drop-down menus can be a great navigation tool, while still being a usable and attractive design feature. drop-down navigation menus can be user-friendly. Recently Jacob Nielsen the results of his recent drop-down ...


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In 99% of the cases you don't need to keep multiple parent items expanded at once. Moreover, it is advisable not to do so, as you don't want the user to get confused about her current location on your website and eventually get lost. And yes, there are scenarios in which you would want to have all the items expanding without collapsing their siblings. Such ...


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"It doesn’t matter how good your website is if users can’t find their way around it." - By jerrycao Continuing with my answer posted just a day before. I stated that collapse menu's are better, and also gave some valid reasons. Note: Please read my previous answer(linked above), come back and continue here. Now talking about your case, I would ...


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Provide them shortcuts for expand/collapse all, then let them organize it from there (unless there's some explicit reason for them not to be able to expand multiple siblings concurrently).


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I've found that letting users choose when tabs open and closed is best, so I would leave it up to the user to collapse one menu, even when following a link in another menu. A scenario describing why would include users who might be navigating through different parts of the site multiple times. If I want to go to the pratius page, then artius, them to ...


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The problem with patterns is that it’s hard to stand out when you’re doing the same thing everyone else is doing. But you don’t want to deviate too far from functionality with something as important as navigation. You need to find that sweet spot right between familiarity and creativity. While thinking outside the box is usually a good idea, but there are ...



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