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1

Alan Cooper, in his classic interface design book, About Face, speaks directly to this question. He points out, as you have, that there are multiple distinct techniques for issuing instructions to a program. He terms these, collectively, "command vectors." Menus are one type of command vector, as are toolbar "buttcons" (his term for toolbar buttons labeled ...


6

It’s a Historical Leftover Speaking specifically about the Windows File Manager, the answer is in the history of its UI. Look at screenshots of the older Windows file manager, and you’ll see there are no +/- icons. Instead, there was a pulldown menu command (in the Tree menu, I think) to expand/collapse. The context menu (and double-clicking) were ...


1

A dashboard is a very different UI than an application, so there is an argument that the navigation can be different. For example, the features are different, the purpose and goals are different, so what works for one might not work for the other. Consistency comes with advantages, so as a general rule of thumb the consistency argument should trump ...


0

Changing the top bar navigation by page is a problem. The user needs to feel safe and always be able to find their way home if is necessary without clicking too much. If you start changing navigation patterns per page at some point the user is going to loose track. Example: all google products, Facebook, Jira, stack exchange. They are all keeping the same ...


3

Whether it's the hamburger menu or the menu bar, navigation should be consistent throughout your system. This features throughout most accessibility guidelines, is good for SEO, and is just generally good practice.


10

According to Jef Raskin at his book The Humane Interface, designers use the following justifications, when they decide to use many ways to perform the same action : One justification for having multiple methods to do a given task is that some users prefer one method and other users prefer a different method. For example, a novice user might find ...


-4

It's this way to prevent you from doing disastrous things. Replace should be disabled and never used. If you worked with XCode and Swift for a while you will realize that the missing refactoring methods for Swift are actually a blessing. They force you to think ahead of naming stuff right, so you won't need refactoring/renaming. For normal (non Swift) IDEs ...


2

Find is sensible with a non-modifiable document. Replace is not. Historically, was "replace" greyed-out or not displayed in read-only mode? Maybe back when there was only space for one copy of the document on the 720k floppy disk? These days, it's normal that the document's text is always modifiable and it's the file that is not, So it is "Save" that is ...


16

Both Find and Find and Replace are related functionally as you mention. But both actions seem to be orthogonal in terms of what user need (mindset) they cater to. You will know in advance either you want to find something or you rather want to substitute occurrences of something. In the latter case it just happens that you need to find occurrences of the ...


0

There's a lot of history to text editors. e.g. vi which is one of the oldest separated these out as there is a defined split between viewing a document (find) and editing a document (replace). In technical terms they're quite different things, like GET vs POST for the web, and text editors are typically quite technical tools. Word Processors less so but I ...


8

If you can expect your users to be power text editor users, for example programmers, then it makes sense to combine these dialogs into one, or, even better, make it a toolbar and show real-time results as you type. This is an expected feature for development tools nowadays, as it speeds up the editing process greatly. IDEs (integrated development ...


4

I see this as new behaviour. Without an old install of MSOffice to test I can't be absolutely sure, but in the past find/replace dialog boxes were often modal, and covered quite a lot of text. For find only tools this isn't necessary - they tend to have 2-4 controls of which only one is a text box (wide). Replace requires at least another text box and ...


59

An interesting question, and one that I think many of us might have pondered before without really diving too deep into the possible issues. From a purely design perspective, I can think of a number of plausible reasons: Convention: the first person did it this way, and then everybody else followed because "that's how it's done". Safety first: separating a ...


0

I'm not going to say whether a context-dependent side menu is the right choice or not. I feel like that's more a design-dependent question. What I will focus on is the UX standards and practices that might help you make up your mind. Do you have a complete buildout for all the screens your app will show? I feel like doing this will lead to a natural sort of ...


3

This delay is often referred to as dwelling time or posting/unposting delay. For linear menus most research works use the value of 333ms (0.3sec). It seems to be a good balance between keeping the menu open for too long / too short. Here're examples of two papers using these values: Supporting menu design with radial layouts Faster Cascading Menu ...


3

Both (hamburger and nav bar) have advantages and disadvantages that make them suitable in particular contexts. It very much comes down to how much value your users get from functionality that you consider for your main navigation, and more objectively, how often they use that functionality. Spotify is a great example where a nav bar makes a lot of sense: ...


4

Hamburger menus, like it or not, are widely recognized Inertia: everyone else is doing it, so we did it and now it's done (until the next major redesign/funding come along) Burgers take up very little space and lend themselves to being tucked into a corner of the screen In many instances, they are effective I want to address that last item in particular. ...


0

I'd recommend using onboarding techniques and some simple animation to show this element and its importance. A good example is the Floating Action Button (FAB) :: Transitions part of Material Design, specially the Morph and Full Screen sub-items. You'll see how the FAB morphs into another element. (visit the page for a more clear video, this is a quick ...


3

You are talking about an on-boarding feature. An on-boarding feature is a thing which introduces new users to your system by putting a spotlight on one or more features. the spotlight can include some additional info via a speech bubble, etc. However, after the user has used that feature you no longer show the spotlight. This technique is also useful for ...


2

Drill down means you show only one menu at a time. It brings you further down the menu structure. An example is the iPod menu: Or see this working example in jQuery. A hierarchical multi-level menu is more like a dropdown or accordion menu where the whole submenu structure is visible: Accordion example: Or as dropdown menu: An example in bootstrap



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