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There is not very much you could do without changing the architecture of the menu. You could change the way you have designed the menu, if you have all of your content in one box then you can segment them as below, so levels with less content will not have lots of empty space. So instead of having your sections rest as vertical sections per level you could ...


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The concepts You are here ( 'this is selected' ) This has deeper navigation ( 'this will take you somewhere else' ) Are quite closely associated concepts in the users "website navigation domain". So having 'arrow based' symbols for both is not conflicting, and may even be beneficial (lower the cognitive load) - providing the styling and contextual ...


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I wouldn't display "No Tip" as an option in a list of tip amounts, that is a form of social pressure. To avoid social pressure, do not require the user to say yes or no, in this way by not taking any action, the decision is to not leave a tip. One idea might be to provide a button at the bottom when reviewing the total payment. "would you like to leave a ...


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Tipping varies wildly between countries, and even between industries. I would suggest two alternatives: If possible, have the operator cofigure the menu according to his particular indusry's customs. Perhaps he could choose between placing the "No tip" item at the top or at the bottom (I think it's usually very inappropriate not to tip, or very uncommon ...


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An ellipsis gives me the idea that the label text didn't fit the space. If I saw it I would hover it to see a tooltip for the complete text. How about using a down arrow: After your comment it's clear that it isn't about a dropdown menu. But I still think the ellipsis isn't the best indicator for an item with it's own menu. Desktop conventions don't ...


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It looks like you can't do much to make this easier. If these are the only options you have than I would go for option 1 and leave it up to the seller to explain the tipping function. Your option #2 is misleading and #3 is confusing. Explaining the tipping function can be done in a very approachable way: Press the arrows to choose a tip if you will and ...


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This totally depends on your culture. In some regions/countries, tipping is seen as normal whereas in other areas, tipping is totally up to the customers and not taken as an offend it a customer doesn't tip (some places in europe e.g.) So depending on your culture I'd go with option 1 or 2.


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I personally like the table checkout at Chili's Restaurants. They use Ziosk. Once you've swiped your card, you're taken to a tip selection screen. If I recall correctly, 20% is selected by default. To not leave a tip, you have to move the slider to zero. You then click "Tip This Amount" to get to the signature step. I feel that making the tip selection an ...


1

The wireframe you have provided (with an arrow on the right of the text) to show that that particular level has sub sections in the same level could be changed. Move the arrow on the right to the left of the button before the text with a few pixels of padding. This is a very standard tree organization approach.


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The most obvious compromise is a left aligned list without icons. I'm not sure what the point of the icons is, other than to make the menu busy and confusing. Is there ever a state (tablets?) where the icons will be the only thing displayed? For all the reasons listed already, left aligned will be easier to read/scan.


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I think Rafa has some very good points. For iOS, Apple in fact does not recommend the hamburger button/side menu. This is why they have not provided a default implementation of it nor used it in any of their apps, although many iOS apps use it. What Apple recommends is tabbars. The main benefit is that you see what's available right away, so no features are ...



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