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5

Great question, and a common design problem. There is no "right" answer here, but here's a contemporary approach: This looks like a commercial website. So, reducing cognitive friction for potential buyers is important. You likely have a large number of users who are new to the site, so providing consistent affordance in your controls (especially in a nav ...


4

Your intuitions have merit -- if it is confusing to you as a developer to have two menu items of the same name, rest assured that it would also be confusing to your users. In this case, the word "View" or "View All" can be used to enumerate this action, for instance: Contacts View All Additional Fields Sub Category I would also hesitate to make your ...


3

On Android this is also very common pattern but with few differences. On Android you position this tabs on top of the screen (mainly because of hardware buttons on the bottom of the phone) You can use scrollable or fixed tabs (for more info: http://developer.android.com/design/building-blocks/tabs.html)


3

Open vs close questions Children Here an advice you'd find sometimes with child education: It is better to provide a child with a specific set of options, instead of leaving it to them to work out the options themselves. For example, instead of asking your child "What would you like to eat?" ask her "Would you like an omelette or rice?". The ...


2

Most of the user would not know what ... means. Try this


2

Generally, I think the entire iTunes UX team should be fired or replaced. I think your observations are spot on. There is little consistency and a litany of terrible UX choices in the current versions of iTunes. The issues include: Inconsistent placement of controls (grid breaking, unintuitive placement) Inconsistent control sizes and indicators (a drop ...


1

This menu system has been around for a while Mobile and tablet game developers like Gameloft have used the interaction for years before the article (or the source demo it references) were written. In tablet games, they are used for cases like casting spells in an action game. It's useful to study why they're effective in those interfaces: The user hits ...


1

The hamburger menu... I'm torn. The hamburger menu decreases discoverability because it hides what the user is more than likely going to use to... well... discover At a glance, the user can tell what's where and how to find what they are looking for. Being hidden underneath someplace isn't ideal for scanability. Having said that, stay away from keeping it ...


1

They almost make as much sense as the word "more" ... As with any icon, I personally have taken to do what you're doing everywhere else in that design: use an icon with a word next to it. "More ..." Or "Menu" followed by the hamburger icon. Alternatively, use a down arrow. That one has worked for years, and is still seeing heavy use across (web based) ...


1

You basically have a two-level navigation hierarchy. That's not unusual. Let's start with the Mobify approach: The Mobify approach is reasonable if you want to constrain users to a single panel, or if you think users will want to jump around the hierarchy frequently so they won't have the patience for a slide-in animation. It's also useful if you want ...


1

You're trying to create what's probably the single most common mobile design pattern, namely drilldown navigation :). You're saying that when you click the arrow, the submenu slides on top of the current one, and from your mockup it appears that the top item leads back to the original menu. In other words, when you click an item, you see the list of the ...


1

I am afraid that the UX world depends on which your users are and therefore the true answer is that there are no solutions to your problem. There are only costs and benefits on choosing either one design or the other but this depends on the users. You should get in touch with them by doing ux research in order to get the proper insights that will guide your ...


1

Show it at the top. In my experience on ecomm product grids, users are more likely to visit subsequent pages if you tell them up front that they exist. It gives them awareness of the number of available options. It also allows them to jump ahead quickly if they already know the first pages doesn't have what they're after. Granular control when necessary ...



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