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The mental model attempts to define a map of the user cognitive processes. Depending on how it's done it can help define what is the user looking for, what kind of decisions is she taking etc. In my experience mental models serve more as a framework to refer to as one explores different possibilities. The mental model itself does not deliver specific design ...


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In my experience, once you know which tasks your user must complete, you can then define your task flows. With task flows you can figure out which pages you need on your site. You also figure out what goes on each page & how everything is grouped together on the page. Then you can start to define how the various pages are linked together, which ...


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Reordering content on narrower screen sizes is a valid and useful approach when done right. I guess a key factor here is to maintain the hierarchy (flow) used in the wide layout. Simply stacking columns under each other without changing the order could easily bury/push down potentially important content in narrow, single-column layouts. The way you've ...


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Taking "Mobile First" paradigm, you could think in a reverse way. You create stacking layout for mobile according to some principle. Probably, the order of the blocks reflects relevance, or usage frequency, or usefulness of the content. So the arguments for the ordering is the base of your layout decision. Designing the desktop layout, apply the same ...


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I think a lot of it depends on how you developed and verified this mental model. If you derived it and tested it with users, it will give the user a framework with which to understand and predict your system instead of requiring the user to wrap their head around your system, on your system's terms. This can be especially true if your system's information ...



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