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10

Build it. Take the time on your own, build it out and let them try it. But, they gave you the answer you need to overcome. Look at WHO you are dealing with. All the storyboards, mockups etc. won't matter as they can't see it. You shot yourself in the foot by doing all of that work first. UX 101: Did you ask the potential user first. "if I could take this ...


9

I'm not sure that these are two competing models. I remember some online discussion over the merits of FAT vs. NTFS, and then some Apple guy came by and said something like "Apple users don't even know they have a file system". I think this made the Digg front page. The point is that MS and Apple are indeed trying to get away from the file system, ...


7

Don't underestimate the beast. It would be like taking Photoshop away from a designer. Excel is actually a phenomenally useable tool that people are familiar with. I've tried and failed to get analysts off Excel. Perhaps you could try watching some of your users to see what they do with Excel - show them that you really do want to help simplify their ...


7

The mental model attempts to define a map of the user cognitive processes. Depending on how it's done it can help define what is the user looking for, what kind of decisions is she taking etc. In my experience mental models serve more as a framework to refer to as one explores different possibilities. The mental model itself does not deliver specific design ...


6

Yes Regarding sliders/carousels I say most definitely yes. Sliders are Lists of Information A slider (e.g., like slidejs) is really a list, or array, of information elements. In this case the elements usually consist of a full-bleed background image possibly containing a title, some descriptive copy, and possibly a link/call-to-action. The idea is you ...


6

Since there is whitespace between the tool (the vacuum cleaner head) and the floor, your icons represents the target (floor surface) and not the tool. Otherwise the image representation would be without the white space in the icon, such as this: One other notable difference is that the icons on the above image is oriented toward the operater of the vacuum ...


4

How could this have been solved to remove all ambiguity? It can't. A user would need to have some experience with vacuum cleaners or have read the instructions. An icon that indicates the state of the vacuum wouldn't be an improvement because it would still require knowledge of how that state applies to the use of the device. Is the brush-down-state ...


4

If errors are clearly indicated, then users can assume that a task that is not marked as an error did complete successfully. However, if most users may have never seen the record for an errored task, then this confusion could occur. Here are my two suggestions, and in my opinion, you should utilize both, but one should be be sufficient: Change 0 seconds ...


4

The problem with most of these icons is that they only show either tool state or surface type. That introduces ambiguity, especially if the user doesn't know how vacuums operate in general or how this specific vacuum works. The obvious solution is to illustrate usage, and that means we have to, at least, display both the tool state and the surface type. ...


4

Just break down the two terms to see the difference and, consequently, the relationship. Note from @PhilipW's link in the comments: Mental models are representations in the mind of real or imaginary situations. From A Gentle Introduction to Mental Models (Phil Johnson-Laird and Ruth Byrne, May 2000) In the context of your question, a mental model is ...


4

In my experience, once you know which tasks your user must complete, you can then define your task flows. With task flows you can figure out which pages you need on your site. You also figure out what goes on each page & how everything is grouped together on the page. Then you can start to define how the various pages are linked together, which ...


3

People do share 'high level' mental models (or schemas) My mental model of say 'house' and your mental model of 'house' have to be generally similar - otherwise nobody in the world would be able to understand anyone else. Here's a (fairly simplistic) link to a description of schemas:


3

I think we are task-centric, and the first step in most tasks is to find the right tool (aka app) to get the job done.


3

Dragging the floppy disc icon to the trash to eject it is a classic twisted mixed up conceptual model.


2

Note than Microsoft seems to believe that this is not the reason why iOS became popular, and tries to position Windows Phone 7 as a platform where you don't need to use apps, and are only a glance away from the content. I wouldn't call Windows 8 more app-centric than previous versions of the OS either. If anything, the new touch UI provides more content at ...


2

A substractive filter makes sense when you have a limited amount of results to start from (e.g. filter for finding email in Gmail and Microsoft Outlook). An additive filter makes sense if you are searching in a near infinite range and want to bring back a finite amount of results (e.g. default in Google search). The most accurate results are received by ...


2

This may be a stupid answer, but have you considered a "cause and effect diagram"?


2

Would "Items that need attention" be suitable?


2

The best example I have is the built-in file versioning built into OS X Lion. The version tracking happens completely transparently as Nic mentioned in his answer, and they provide an interface based on their previous tool Time Machine for browsing historical versions: Image taken from Apple.com The most important thing about this solution though (that ...


2

The key to introducing version control into an interface is to make it as transparent as possible. I'd hide terms like "branching" and "merging" from the interface, as these terms aren't really important to the user - version control supports their task of making changes, so creating a transparent version control interfaces would be my top concern. Also, ...


2

The primary issue hear is that there are too many factors for a single pair of icons to consistently represent across makes and cultures. Not all vacuum cleaner attachments work the same way, nor does everybody bring a consistent set of assumptions about what the icons are likely to represent. The primary variables are: Floor surface. Brush type. Brush ...


2

There's really no "correct" answer here. Any kind of information stored in the physical world is subject to interpretation. People have different understandings for the meanings of symbols, words, sounds, buildings, poems, etc... There's no way for anything to really be 100% clear, since our understanding of the world is built on our individual past ...


2

The first pattern that comes to mind is something like the forget password flow. User fills out and submits form requesting "certification". (You forget password but know your information, enter email and request new one) Certifier receives request, authorizes. An email is sent to user with an account specific link with access to perscribed content. ...


2

This is commonly referred to as an "Approval" process, you may have better luck researching that term. However, I've done this on multiple systems in multiple industries. My suggestions are to have the following: Home page with quick access to "My pending approvals" and "Create prescription" (substitute with whatever is relevant) Concise notification area ...


2

This is a question about science of sales but not UX. So we need to identify customer's problem and offer appropriate solution. In your question you mentioned 'The problem', let's think for whom are these problems? As we can see from your explanations - this is not a problem for those with whom you discussed it. So there are two possible ways - find the ...


2

What you identify as problems/issues may not be problems/issues for those people. But even then I am sure that they can identify things that they would like to improve with the existing spreadsheets (if not, then I am afraid it is not an easy case). I think the buy-in is to start by solving problems that they have with usability (you have to find a need for ...


2

Reordering content on narrower screen sizes is a valid and useful approach when done right. I guess a key factor here is to maintain the hierarchy (flow) used in the wide layout. Simply stacking columns under each other without changing the order could easily bury/push down potentially important content in narrow, single-column layouts. The way you've ...


2

The question is valid, but it has somewhat of a 'backwards' scent. Normally, you conduct a research (eg, card sorting) with some research goal in mind. The goal will account for the various personas. In other words, you recruit participants based on the fit criteria defined by the research goal which accounts for personas. Consider for example a site (or ...


1

I think your mental model i.e. option 1) is correct - i.e. the brush head should be simple and just tell you whether brush is in or out rather than try to give you a helpful tip on what surface to use (which completely inverts the logic). The Nilfisk hoover we have does away with any icons but you have to push on the longer half of the lever against a ...


1

I'd say the icon currently represents one of 2 states: with and without the brush. The UX problem is that the user needs to know what that means - rug or hard floor (otherwise there is an additional mental step to take, and we want to reduce cognitive load). One way to resolve it would be to write in the local language what each state means; I'm not aware of ...



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