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There's an argument that if they've arrived on the site with the intention to buy something, then they want the journey to purchase something labelled clearly with the word "buy". On UX (rather than marketing) grounds I'd use "discover" on a lead generation site, and "buy" on a purchasing site. If your site is a place where people expect to buy things, ...


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IMHO, the word "buy" isn't attractive. People are more curious, they like discovering at first sight. They don't want to buy anything (unless it's proven that the product would efficiently change or enhance their life for the good, then they could run!) Before buying a product, people are attracted then, if convinced, buy. If the word "buy" is right away ...


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Discover has a sense of finding something new. So if the action is largely linked to finding new and interesting options, then I would go with this. Buy is a transactional word, and indicates that you will go to get a product to purchase. Use this if your user likely already knows what they will be buying and won't primarily be discovering new items. ...


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UX as a term and discipline is somewhat new. Prior to it being called UX it was often call HCI (Human Computer Interaction). Today, now, aside from recent grads, most UX professionals do not have a User Experience Degree. The degrees and experience they do have can very wildly. Graphic Design (maybe lean towards UI Design) Industrial Design (also UI ...


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The short answer to this question is No. Would you let one user stop a different user from receiving email? Of course not because they don't have the authority to opt out (or in) for someone else. If a person opts out of receiving email then nobody else has the authority to opt them back in. Legally anyone is free to send non-threatening emails to any ...


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You could claim that educational e-mails are not marketing, however the customer might not see it the same way. If they have explicitly opted-out I would avoid sending them non-transactional e-mails, as you would be on questionable ground. Unless your terms at purchase cover you, called a "soft opt-in" by the UK ICO. You can of course ask them to opt back ...



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