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5

TL;DR It all depends on what you want to show your users and the message you are trying to send with the data. Long version: So what you describe are two methods of visualizing a map called "Equal Interval" (absolute) and "Quantile" (relative). The Equal Interval Method makes sure that the same number of values are in each classification set. So in ...


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Here's an idea you may be interested in: It reduces the required space for your marker, and the numbers provide more vision of the map. Outlining them makes them easier to read. Kind of plain. But it's withstood the test of time.


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Hmmm, grouping together markers may not serve the purpose. From what I know, markers are used to uniquely identify something or somewhere. Grouping together unique identities is tricky and can be misinforming. Instead of being represented as one big marker, why not markers become small dots when zoomed out and then have the location precisely cataloged so ...


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So there are two approaches coming from a cartographic standpoint that could work in your situation, but it depends on what you want the user to do with these markers. The first involves the user using these as just a visual aid meaning they would have no interactivity and be just static images to inform the user. In this case, I would a pie chart marker ...


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You could keep a single pin as the marker but organise a simple visualisation within the pin so the data stays 'contained'. You could increase the size of the pin a little if you have more items to show. For example: Or moving the icon outside the inner circle: You could change the shape of the pin: And you could colour the pin according to the ...


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The better solution is to display markers which are aligned to the map scale. Map creates the context for the markers, so when map is zoomed-out, it has no sense for user to see separate markers, as at the given scale exact locations are lost within the large geographical area. Remember, the marker itself is the mean to point to exact location. So be ...


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Maybe you could combine the pin with a checkbox and give the pin two clearly distinguishable states (checked, unchecked and maybe differentiate with a colour too, see image). This allows the user to make a selection of different locations/items in one view. It should be clear what can be done with the selected items and I suppose there is a button somewhere ...



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