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122

They have (slightly) different meanings and usage Although both icons are similar and both are popularly recognized, they do have slightly different connotations. ❤ The heart icon Is more emotive by its very nature. As such, it's more likely to be associated with positive feelings such as love, like, happy, etc. Is used by popular applications such ...


83

Spell it out to the user. You don't want to leave them guessing so I would recommend you add a simple addition to your UI. Note the change of language in the search box. By saying choose location you are more or less saying "do it here", whereby now it is clear it is just one of two options.


50

Just to think outside the box I've decided to paste a radical suggestion to this, as I have called it "map-tap" problem :) Imagine if a low opacity touch gesture image appeared over the map either for a few seconds and then disappear or it would stay there, lingering like a ghost, hinting to the user what to do. When a user taps the map it would disappear. ...


21

You could de-emphasize the search field, e.g. by not showing it by default. Just say "Choose a location" in the head of the screen, and have a magnifying glass button that pops up the search field for people who want to enter an address. Something like this: Even if you don't go with this approach, you might want to adjust your text sizes and wording. ...


19

I think the difference between the two isn't huge, both are frequently used for the feature you are describing. Perhaps thinking of the emotion you are trying to evoke is more important. For example, a favourite on this site is represented by a star. This makes sense, it's a 'professional' site. Whereas if I'm on a site like say AirBNB, a heart makes ...


17

Have you considered moving the map, rather than moving the "pin"? Scrolling a map is a common action in most map applications, if you keep the reticule static and move the map underneath it, the user can target their desired position. The text in the box should update as the user scrolls. This might allow you to get away with no additional help messaging. ...


12

Since users are likely to see the entry form first, how about using the placeholder text for this? "Enter location or just pick from map ..."


9

Since the objective is to favorite a location in a mobile the recommendation would be a GEO-HEART. This is the ideal graphical representation to portray the favorite location.


5

So there are two approaches coming from a cartographic standpoint that could work in your situation, but it depends on what you want the user to do with these markers. The first involves the user using these as just a visual aid meaning they would have no interactivity and be just static images to inform the user. In this case, I would a pie chart marker ...


5

TL;DR It all depends on what you want to show your users and the message you are trying to send with the data. Long version: So what you describe are two methods of visualizing a map called "Equal Interval" (absolute) and "Quantile" (relative). The Equal Interval Method makes sure that the same number of values are in each classification set. So in ...


5

Getting in the trap of scrolling map area instead of page scrolling is definitely bad experience. Still current solution looks overcomplicated and provides a barrier to interaction. The design looks a bit contradictory: large map area assumes reach user interaction with map content (primary task), but scrolling beyond map control looks like users don't need ...


4

Here is my solution - crosshair. Map can be moved but selected location is obvious. Screenshot is a few years old, hence Android 2.x maps and widgets.


4

The problem with DT definitions is that if you ask two practitioners to define DT you'll get four different answers — see this discussion on the DT LinkedIn group for example ;-) That said, since the IDEO and d.school approaches to DT have lot of the same folk involved, I'd say that these two are mostly describing the same process with different words. ...


4

Coming from a cartography background, I agree with you in a sense. Some of those maps are useless, however some are quite useful. Let's take a look at a couple examples. The first is something like you describe like on the Yelp website when you search. The link provided takes you to a search I did searching for Taco places in NYC and as you can see, this ...


4

It's best to follow current standards for mapping. That means, in this case, setting a start and end point by either dragging flags into place or tapping on the location while dragging to move the map. Most (if not all) map apps, ie Google maps, Apple maps, Waze, Bing, and more follow this behavior. At the risk of sounding like you should take the safe ...


4

Could this confuse the user ? Will he start looking for other places on this map ? Expect him to look for other places, but he will also likely be expecting not to find them. Usually this means he'll zoom out/drag a bit and then having done so, either get out of the map or stop looking altogether. Try provide an easy way to 'get back to where the ...


3

"How do I do clustering on a map correctly" is a common question in mapping applications. Short answer: Clustering doesn't work. There is no such thing as good clustering UX, as clustering is not good UX. The reason is simple: The user is either interested in an area, or a point. He might be interested in the density of an area (population, number of ice ...


3

Before we can come up with sensible UI. We need to examine the 3 use cases. Are they truly 3 completely independent use cases, or 3 "subtype" of the same use case: "Show me the shortest route to X"? The first 2 cases are easier to understand. From my current location (I'm assuming the system already knows where I am) goto the closest X. Where X can be a ...


3

Yes, limiting the number of results on the map will simplify the map, however... ...it creates a bias that could influence your user in either a positive or negative way. There are a lot of factors that go into this though and there are two tracks of people I can see when using this map (Explorers and Beeliners). Explorers are going to go around the map, ...


2

I just randomly found this but thought that I could help out in some way. You ought to check out a company like Mapbox! A great, styler for Google Maps design. This customizer is great for these GM integrations. Also, in my personal experience, I have used maps in websites before. In commerce design, it's essential for displaying the numerous retailers ...


2

Typically maps shown on a website are small as they aren't the focus of the page, and so trying to navigate or interact with a small map is a nightmare. So usability wise, the interactivity is poor. To me the best option is to use a good looking stylistic map, but make it clickable and link it to an interactive online map where a user can use the full ...


2

The aesthetic and planning advantages of using a 3d map are outweighed by the added time costs required to create the 3d map. It's not like the cameras magically fly out of the boxes they came in and move to where-ever you touch on the map. They are carefully placed and wired into locations that serve the camera-owner's need. Long after the cameras are in ...


2

So I actually did my Masters thesis research on the default zoom level and level of detail that users prefer when working with way finding and identification tasks. Overall, users tend to prefer a large scale map (more zoomed in) and a generalized view (as opposed to satellite imagery). However, there are exceptions to this. When setting the initial zoom, ...


2

If you use a rating for your locations as well, I would go for a heart as favourite icon. Stars are usually used for a rating like 3 out of 5. I've never seen this with hearts. Otherwise star and heart just have a different tone as Vincent already said.


2

Let me answer some of your questions and then I'll talk about some pitfalls with an example. Could this confuse the user? Will he start looking for other places on this map? A map widget will not confuse a user. It will offer more clarity to the user on how to find your shop, look for things to do near your shop and other local facilities and ...


1

I faced a similar problem and solved it by extending the Google Maps Marker Cluster Library and using pie charts as suggested by BDD instead of the default cluster marker that comes with the library. You can download the solution from my GitHub repository: https://github.com/hassanlatif/chart-marker-clusterer


1

The better solution is to display markers which are aligned to the map scale. Map creates the context for the markers, so when map is zoomed-out, it has no sense for user to see separate markers, as at the given scale exact locations are lost within the large geographical area. Remember, the marker itself is the mean to point to exact location. So be ...


1

This is a common problem with maps. There is a solution called MarkerClustering. You can read more about it on the web. Here are some starting points: https://developers.google.com/maps/articles/toomanymarkers And here is an example of its implementation: http://leaflet.github.io/Leaflet.markercluster/example/marker-clustering-realworld.388.html


1

You're already communicating two dimensions of information with your icons: Number of likes Type of icon (question, post) You want to add a third dimension (multiple posts per icon). It's going to be difficult to do this because: Having icons communicate more than 2 dimensions of information is not a good idea. You are going to need some way to ...


1

There is two scenarios: Is this the address that they know? The best solution is to give them the text area then they can type the first characters and the rest of story... In order to confirm the accuracy of the entered address, you can also give show them a dropped pin in a map view as well (maybe in a next step) Then they should be able to edit the ...



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