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82

Spell it out to the user. You don't want to leave them guessing so I would recommend you add a simple addition to your UI. Note the change of language in the search box. By saying choose location you are more or less saying "do it here", whereby now it is clear it is just one of two options.


49

Just to think outside the box I've decided to paste a radical suggestion to this, as I have called it "map-tap" problem :) Imagine if a low opacity touch gesture image appeared over the map either for a few seconds and then disappear or it would stay there, lingering like a ghost, hinting to the user what to do. When a user taps the map it would disappear. ...


20

You could de-emphasize the search field, e.g. by not showing it by default. Just say "Choose a location" in the head of the screen, and have a magnifying glass button that pops up the search field for people who want to enter an address. Something like this: Even if you don't go with this approach, you might want to adjust your text sizes and wording. ...


16

Have you considered moving the map, rather than moving the "pin"? Scrolling a map is a common action in most map applications, if you keep the reticule static and move the map underneath it, the user can target their desired position. The text in the box should update as the user scrolls. This might allow you to get away with no additional help messaging. ...


11

Since users are likely to see the entry form first, how about using the placeholder text for this? "Enter location or just pick from map ..."


9

You are probably asking this because your into implementing it as a developer. The API of the most used map, Google Maps, call these needles for "markers". I'd guess this is the most technically correct word to use. Reference: Google Maps API Markers However I guess your target audience isn't developers and in there daily life call the needles "Pins". And ...


5

If these things are strongly correlated in users' minds to geographic locations, then I would certainly try to work "location" or "point" into the name. If these are reports of incidents or conditions, and only weakly correlated to geography, you might call them "issues", "reports", "incidents", etc. All the examples you gave seem to fall more into the ...


4

You can restrict the map in a tricky way. When user goes out of the target area, the map shows in some way it's no more useful for them. This could be fading out effect, blurring and desatiration, etc., see the picture below: Another option is to create tension while dragging out of the target area. Compare this to the last slide signifier in the sliding ...


3

Before we can come up with sensible UI. We need to examine the 3 use cases. Are they truly 3 completely independent use cases, or 3 "subtype" of the same use case: "Show me the shortest route to X"? The first 2 cases are easier to understand. From my current location (I'm assuming the system already knows where I am) goto the closest X. Where X can be a ...


3

Googles implementation is nice - the icons are actually a see through window of what will happen when pressed. The satellite image in the Earth box shows the actual satellite image of that square. When clicking Earth, the icon turns into a Map icon, showing the map in that square. http://www.fastcodesign.com/3027177/behind-google-maps-new-design Further ...


3

The obvious answer is to render the elephants standing on the turtle's back, but there are other options. Having the map snap back to fit to the edge on zoom out could be confusing, as the user will expect the zoom at the edge to behave in the same way as zoom in the middle. You could however make the map slowly drift back to fill the empty space. A ...


3

Coming from a cartography background, I agree with you in a sense. Some of those maps are useless, however some are quite useful. Let's take a look at a couple examples. The first is something like you describe like on the Yelp website when you search. The link provided takes you to a search I did searching for Taco places in NYC and as you can see, this ...


3

The problem with DT definitions is that if you ask two practitioners to define DT you'll get four different answers — see this discussion on the DT LinkedIn group for example ;-) That said, since the IDEO and d.school approaches to DT have lot of the same folk involved, I'd say that these two are mostly describing the same process with different words. ...


2

Pros: Your design would be intuitive if it had manual search built in. Here is one very typical use case: I am searching for things around a location that I will be at later. I'm not familiar with what the location looks like on a map. I don't know what part of town it is in, but I know the cross streets. Cons: more coding hours. Verdict: Build the ...


2

Firstly with Google Maps there are two routes to a location search box browse map If an location information is always displayed same place regardless of the route used to find it this is a UX win in terms of Consistency heuristic. Secondly note that in Google maps the linear menu changes. This means that a radial menu would alter. And thus any ...


2

As Franchesca suggested, you could fill the empty space with an empty pattern or you could tile the map... thus creating an infinite continuous 2D space where when you reach one end, you end up at the other, which is similar to what happens on a surface of a sphere. I do not suggest snapping the point of view back into the area of the mapped world, as ...


2

There is no such pattern. Special difficulty is in touchscreen, because in other case you can show hide icon on hover. I suppose clicking on pin shows some popover with information about pin — so to solve the problem add there "Hide pin" button/link. Also don't forget to add on map control panel button with text similar to "Restore hidden pins (XX)" (XX is ...


2

I recommend muting the map by greying it out and reducing the amount of information it displays beyond France. If the navigation is suddenly disabled for a user exploring the map beyond France, there is a chance the user will interpret it as a bug and close the application. Furthermore, what happens for the user who loads the map in another country? Is ...


2

"Markers" is probably the best technical term. "Pins" is probably the most common word in a non-technical, colloquial sense. I tend to agree with @Benny in the sense that you should use what is most familiar to your users - however I don't think that that vast of a majority of users call it a "pin" as opposed to "marker". But I'm just speculating, so go ...


2

Text Obviously you can represent the values of multiple variables with text beside the marker. For example, on general aviation sectional maps, airport markers include text for the name, location identifier, control tower frequency, ATIS frequency, Unicom frequency, elevation, and runway length, among other information. For an electronic map, some or all ...


2

Show my location. See the top answer to this question: "Your" vs "My" in user interfaces When users tell the program what to do, use 'my' (e.g. show my location). When the program asks the user, use 'your' (e.g. do you want to share your location?).


2

Here is my solution - crosshair. Map can be moved but selected location is obvious. Screenshot is a few years old, hence Android 2.x maps and widgets.


2

The aesthetic and planning advantages of using a 3d map are outweighed by the added time costs required to create the 3d map. It's not like the cameras magically fly out of the boxes they came in and move to where-ever you touch on the map. They are carefully placed and wired into locations that serve the camera-owner's need. Long after the cameras are in ...


2

Typically maps shown on a website are small as they aren't the focus of the page, and so trying to navigate or interact with a small map is a nightmare. So usability wise, the interactivity is poor. To me the best option is to use a good looking stylistic map, but make it clickable and link it to an interactive online map where a user can use the full ...


2

I just randomly found this but thought that I could help out in some way. You ought to check out a company like Mapbox! A great, styler for Google Maps design. This customizer is great for these GM integrations. Also, in my personal experience, I have used maps in websites before. In commerce design, it's essential for displaying the numerous retailers ...


1

What I would suggest is show a skewed, isometric view of the entire building to the user and let the user drag/slide a slider to the desired floor (ref. Image 1). A tooltip may slide along with the slider to indicate which floor is currently selected. Once the user stops sliding, this tooltip can transform into a confirm button to confirm selected floor. ...


1

Great question. This won't be a definitive answer by any means, but here are a few key things I would keep in mind. Note that some of what I'm about to say has already been covered very well in the following two articles: How Should Your Mobile and Desktop Sites Differ? Your Content, Now Mobile Which information should be left on the map? Short answer: ...


1

As a phone is an "smart" device I would expect that there would be a better UX than mapping a static paper/digital map into phone format. I would approach design from a goal driven point of view e.g. A fire escape plan has key information if there is fire, but this information is just ancillary. The goal is to get out of building safely and as quickly as ...


1

Label the areas between the bands rather than the bands themselves. If you know your minimum and maximum values, you could also add those at the very end of the legend. This way, it's clear what range of values each band represents rather than just pretending that everything in the range equals the value it has been quantized to. EDIT: If it's ...


1

I would not overdo it. Just add to the map (or in the menu) a "Home" button that centers your map in the desired area. PROs: Easy to implement and understand. The user still has the full functionality of the map if he wants, for example, see how far point B in France is from his house in Munich. Flexible and expandible (want to use the app for several ...



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