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10

The fact is, it doesn't matter what you think. You shouldn't disable scroll wheel zoom just because it's better for you because you are not your typical user. For those using Google Maps embedded into your page, users are going to have have some pre-conceived expectations of how it should behave - i.e. they expect it to behave like Google Maps in its normal ...


4

Default Location: The app can ask the user to narrow down a default location, or this could perhaps be queried from the device being used. For example, in the absence of GPS or GEO IP I may have previously specified that I am in "Seattle, WA", or just "Washington", but maybe just "United States". This would allow you to zoom in onto a specific location. ...


4

There's quite a bit of research on cartography on the web, but most of it is not recent. The Commission on Maps and The Internet has published two books on the topic. While I haven't used the material personally, it might be of some use to you.


4

I recently worked on an app that had a feature that allowed the user to search or browse for clinics nearby. One thing I got from the tests is that the map view works great mainly for visually displaying (quickly) what is nearby the user. They can process that much faster via the map/pin UI. However, if the user is looking for more information or browsing, ...


3

I think the main problem with the current design is the visual separation between the textual search option and the geolocation option. You are giving the user a choice between these two search methods but not presenting them together in the same place. The text search option is displayed prominently at the top and is easy to recognise but the geolocation ...


2

Established convention for scroll wheel map zooming is a strong argument. But... I have bad personal experience with scroll wheel map zooming, too. The problem is map zooming occurs instead of needed content scrolling. The app displays bus route on the map and trip details on the right panel. The map doesn't provide rich interaction, I'd say it is rather ...


2

There is no such pattern. Special difficulty is in touchscreen, because in other case you can show hide icon on hover. I suppose clicking on pin shows some popover with information about pin — so to solve the problem add there "Hide pin" button/link. Also don't forget to add on map control panel button with text similar to "Restore hidden pins (XX)" (XX is ...


1

Will the geo data for all users be pulled in a batch every 5 minutes? If so you could probably do away with the (potentially confusing) changing avatars, and simply put something on the top or bottom of the screen advising the user of the time since the last refresh - You might even give the user the ability to 'force' a refresh of the data. If you were ...


1

... without any click-action. If the pin does not currently have any click-action then you could include a close icon on the pin itself and give it a click-action (click to close): However, this does go against convention a bit, as users often expect to click the pin to get more information. Although with a big red cross maybe this message is made ...


1

I believe you are approaching this with a premise that all users are aware of all the functionality which is associated with Google maps and would know how to use it and an updated design would perhaps confuse them. While that might be true for specific users, it might not be the case with all users. My recommendation would be to do some usability testing ...


1

Update: I rewrote my answer after thinking more. I'm not exactly sure that combining the two is a great choice. You can differentiate tags and and a search string with a common differentiator -- a hash before a tag tells your system to treat that term as a tag instead of a search string -- but mashing the two may needlessly make your system more ...


1

It is a question of the usability. If you use zoom in / out buttons, you must think about the location of the buttons. If you're using small buttons, it will be hard to tap a button or maybe you tap on the map itself and do something you won't to do. It would be helpful to see your existing UI where you implement the map. If you already have a lot ...


1

A circle with the user's current location at the center. It places no constraint on the user's choice of direction. Most likely your application is screen based and thus for restrained by some type of square display. The best aspect ratio obviously depends on the device and screen real estate and how it is used and navigated.


1

The list in addition to the markers is really important, in part because markers can often be too close together to pick between the results. Perhaps, on the mobile version, you can have easy access to the list, in addition to the maps. Google maps on mobile does a great job at this: Note the icon in the search bar to view a list. Upon clicking the list ...


1

I think it depends on the purpose of the map on your page: If the map is the primary content (e.g. search results, directions) then the user is likely to want to see details in the map and allowing zooming via the scroll wheel is preferable to forcing them to click the +/- buttons or zoom by double-clicking. If the map content is equal or secondary to ...


1

If the map on your website takes almost entire width of the page you have used then it would definitely affects the end user experience. We may have to disable scroll to behave as zoom. Otherwise if the map used in the page leaves almost 50% of width for easy scrolling, as used by many websites which I have visited and then a link to take user to Google ...



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