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7

You are probably asking this because your into implementing it as a developer. The API of the most used map, Google Maps, call these needles for "markers". I'd guess this is the most technically correct word to use. Reference: Google Maps API Markers However I guess your target audience isn't developers and in there daily life call the needles "Pins". And ...


5

I recently worked on an app that had a feature that allowed the user to search or browse for clinics nearby. One thing I got from the tests is that the map view works great mainly for visually displaying (quickly) what is nearby the user. They can process that much faster via the map/pin UI. However, if the user is looking for more information or browsing, ...


4

Default Location: The app can ask the user to narrow down a default location, or this could perhaps be queried from the device being used. For example, in the absence of GPS or GEO IP I may have previously specified that I am in "Seattle, WA", or just "Washington", but maybe just "United States". This would allow you to zoom in onto a specific location. ...


4

There's quite a bit of research on cartography on the web, but most of it is not recent. The Commission on Maps and The Internet has published two books on the topic. While I haven't used the material personally, it might be of some use to you.


4

You can restrict the map in a tricky way. When user goes out of the target area, the map shows in some way it's no more useful for them. This could be fading out effect, blurring and desatiration, etc., see the picture below: Another option is to create tension while dragging out of the target area. Compare this to the last slide signifier in the sliding ...


3

Googles implementation is nice - the icons are actually a see through window of what will happen when pressed. The satellite image in the Earth box shows the actual satellite image of that square. When clicking Earth, the icon turns into a Map icon, showing the map in that square. http://www.fastcodesign.com/3027177/behind-google-maps-new-design Further ...


3

If these things are strongly correlated in users' minds to geographic locations, then I would certainly try to work "location" or "point" into the name. If these are reports of incidents or conditions, and only weakly correlated to geography, you might call them "issues", "reports", "incidents", etc. All the examples you gave seem to fall more into the ...


3

I think the main problem with the current design is the visual separation between the textual search option and the geolocation option. You are giving the user a choice between these two search methods but not presenting them together in the same place. The text search option is displayed prominently at the top and is easy to recognise but the geolocation ...


3

The obvious answer is to render the elephants standing on the turtle's back, but there are other options. Having the map snap back to fit to the edge on zoom out could be confusing, as the user will expect the zoom at the edge to behave in the same way as zoom in the middle. You could however make the map slowly drift back to fill the empty space. A ...


3

Before we can come up with sensible UI. We need to examine the 3 use cases. Are they truly 3 completely independent use cases, or 3 "subtype" of the same use case: "Show me the shortest route to X"? The first 2 cases are easier to understand. From my current location (I'm assuming the system already knows where I am) goto the closest X. Where X can be a ...


2

Pros: Your design would be intuitive if it had manual search built in. Here is one very typical use case: I am searching for things around a location that I will be at later. I'm not familiar with what the location looks like on a map. I don't know what part of town it is in, but I know the cross streets. Cons: more coding hours. Verdict: Build the ...


2

As Franchesca suggested, you could fill the empty space with an empty pattern or you could tile the map... thus creating an infinite continuous 2D space where when you reach one end, you end up at the other, which is similar to what happens on a surface of a sphere. I do not suggest snapping the point of view back into the area of the mapped world, as ...


2

There is no such pattern. Special difficulty is in touchscreen, because in other case you can show hide icon on hover. I suppose clicking on pin shows some popover with information about pin — so to solve the problem add there "Hide pin" button/link. Also don't forget to add on map control panel button with text similar to "Restore hidden pins (XX)" (XX is ...


2

Firstly with Google Maps there are two routes to a location search box browse map If an location information is always displayed same place regardless of the route used to find it this is a UX win in terms of Consistency heuristic. Secondly note that in Google maps the linear menu changes. This means that a radial menu would alter. And thus any ...


2

I recommend muting the map by greying it out and reducing the amount of information it displays beyond France. If the navigation is suddenly disabled for a user exploring the map beyond France, there is a chance the user will interpret it as a bug and close the application. Furthermore, what happens for the user who loads the map in another country? Is ...


2

"Markers" is probably the best technical term. "Pins" is probably the most common word in a non-technical, colloquial sense. I tend to agree with @Benny in the sense that you should use what is most familiar to your users - however I don't think that that vast of a majority of users call it a "pin" as opposed to "marker". But I'm just speculating, so go ...


2

Show my location. See the top answer to this question: "Your" vs "My" in user interfaces When users tell the program what to do, use 'my' (e.g. show my location). When the program asks the user, use 'your' (e.g. do you want to share your location?).


1

Label the areas between the bands rather than the bands themselves. If you know your minimum and maximum values, you could also add those at the very end of the legend. This way, it's clear what range of values each band represents rather than just pretending that everything in the range equals the value it has been quantized to. EDIT: If it's ...


1

I would not overdo it. Just add to the map (or in the menu) a "Home" button that centers your map in the desired area. PROs: Easy to implement and understand. The user still has the full functionality of the map if he wants, for example, see how far point B in France is from his house in Munich. Flexible and expandible (want to use the app for several ...


1

What about calling them Points of interest? This is descriptive to your user, doesn't have a positive or negative connotation and is clear on what it means. Using markers or pins is a good way to describe the icon, but what you want to describe is the actual location. For this reason I would advise calling them:"points of interest", "locations" (as ...


1

You need to prioritize your requirements and place appropriate buttons on the map. You can place the buttons near any of the four corners(with some margin ofcourse) An example would be: Place the 'my-location' button on the map. this is so that the user can quickly return to his current location. For me, even though it takes some space, it is something ...


1

Click based method As you mentioned in your question, the first way is to drop a pointer on click. The click option is well used by Google maps, a click and drag moves the map around and a double click zooms in. This means that there are issues with overloading the click event with too many functions and that can lead to problems. For example, the user ...


1

I believe that the segment control can go to bottom area of screen just like the following screen


1

IMHO, adding a UIToolbar underneath the navigation bar and have those segmented controls in it would be appropriate. This actually takes up a bit of space on the MapView as you place the UIToolbar on the MapView but that would actually look a lot better on iPhone.


1

The flaw you described is covered by Nielsen Heuristic "Visibility of System status" The system should always keep users informed about what is going on, through appropriate feedback within reasonable time. Your internal system state has the new address, but the user still see's the old address until "much later". It is critical that the internal ...


1

+1 one for a good UX question! Trust that the user is doing what he wants to do and skip all "are you sure" dialoges. Instead - make sure the user notices that he has moved the pin a long way from the original place and make it easy for the user to reset the position if he finds out that it's wrong. This way of designing stuff is, amongst others, ...


1

Do you know why the users are moving the pin? Is it by accident or because their first drop was not correct? If it's accidental then you have a usability problem where the user is doing something they don't intend to do. If that is the case, change your interaction so the UI isn't so touchy. If they are moving the pin because they didn't "mean" to ...


1

I believe you are approaching this with a premise that all users are aware of all the functionality which is associated with Google maps and would know how to use it and an updated design would perhaps confuse them. While that might be true for specific users, it might not be the case with all users. My recommendation would be to do some usability testing ...


1

Update: I rewrote my answer after thinking more. I'm not exactly sure that combining the two is a great choice. You can differentiate tags and and a search string with a common differentiator -- a hash before a tag tells your system to treat that term as a tag instead of a search string -- but mashing the two may needlessly make your system more ...


1

Will the geo data for all users be pulled in a batch every 5 minutes? If so you could probably do away with the (potentially confusing) changing avatars, and simply put something on the top or bottom of the screen advising the user of the time since the last refresh - You might even give the user the ability to 'force' a refresh of the data. If you were ...



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