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127

They have (slightly) different meanings and usage Although both icons are similar and both are popularly recognized, they do have slightly different connotations. ❤ The heart icon Is more emotive by its very nature. As such, it's more likely to be associated with positive feelings such as love, like, happy, etc. Is used by popular applications such ...


20

I think the difference between the two isn't huge, both are frequently used for the feature you are describing. Perhaps thinking of the emotion you are trying to evoke is more important. For example, a favourite on this site is represented by a star. This makes sense, it's a 'professional' site. Whereas if I'm on a site like say AirBNB, a heart makes ...


9

Since the objective is to favorite a location in a mobile the recommendation would be a GEO-HEART. This is the ideal graphical representation to portray the favorite location.


8

tl;dr: It's a sheet. The pattern is related to the persistent bottom sheet element on mobile. The MD guidelines actually reference the map example specifically when explaining this approach: On desktop, content ordinarily presented in a persistent bottom sheet might move onto a new sheet of material. On larger screens it may be more appropriate to ...


6

So there are two approaches coming from a cartographic standpoint that could work in your situation, but it depends on what you want the user to do with these markers. The first involves the user using these as just a visual aid meaning they would have no interactivity and be just static images to inform the user. In this case, I would a pie chart marker ...


6

Getting in the trap of scrolling map area instead of page scrolling is definitely bad experience. Still current solution looks overcomplicated and provides a barrier to interaction. The design looks a bit contradictory: large map area assumes reach user interaction with map content (primary task), but scrolling beyond map control looks like users don't need ...


6

Examples 1-3 could be individually plotted using a heat map. Yes, it may be reasonable if you have high resolution data. In this representation heat map is an invaluable tool (besides opinable choice of color pair): However if you do not have high resolution data then an heat map is not the only available solution. Take for example this low-res map: ...


5

TL;DR It all depends on what you want to show your users and the message you are trying to send with the data. Long version: So what you describe are two methods of visualizing a map called "Equal Interval" (absolute) and "Quantile" (relative). The Equal Interval Method makes sure that the same number of values are in each classification set. So in ...


4

Could this confuse the user ? Will he start looking for other places on this map ? Expect him to look for other places, but he will also likely be expecting not to find them. Usually this means he'll zoom out/drag a bit and then having done so, either get out of the map or stop looking altogether. Try provide an easy way to 'get back to where the ...


4

It's best to follow current standards for mapping. That means, in this case, setting a start and end point by either dragging flags into place or tapping on the location while dragging to move the map. Most (if not all) map apps, ie Google maps, Apple maps, Waze, Bing, and more follow this behavior. At the risk of sounding like you should take the safe ...


4

The problem with DT definitions is that if you ask two practitioners to define DT you'll get four different answers — see this discussion on the DT LinkedIn group for example ;-) That said, since the IDEO and d.school approaches to DT have lot of the same folk involved, I'd say that these two are mostly describing the same process with different words. ...


4

The user journey map shows the screens the user interacts with, in chronological order. It may also include the user's thoughts, emotions, or choice points. Even if your personas go through similar sequences of steps in the app, there should be some important differences between their experiences. Therefore, you'd want a separate map for each one (though you ...


3

"How do I do clustering on a map correctly" is a common question in mapping applications. Short answer: Clustering doesn't work. There is no such thing as good clustering UX, as clustering is not good UX. The reason is simple: The user is either interested in an area, or a point. He might be interested in the density of an area (population, number of ice ...


3

Yes, limiting the number of results on the map will simplify the map, however... ...it creates a bias that could influence your user in either a positive or negative way. There are a lot of factors that go into this though and there are two tracks of people I can see when using this map (Explorers and Beeliners). Explorers are going to go around the map, ...


2

A map pin denotes a location, it doesn't give you info about what that location is in order for the user to make the decision that "Yes, I'm interested in this location". So something like this may make sense download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups When user clicks/taps on the pin, display a popover with details about ...


2

If you use a rating for your locations as well, I would go for a heart as favourite icon. Stars are usually used for a rating like 3 out of 5. I've never seen this with hearts. Otherwise star and heart just have a different tone as Vincent already said.


2

So I actually did my Masters thesis research on the default zoom level and level of detail that users prefer when working with way finding and identification tasks. Overall, users tend to prefer a large scale map (more zoomed in) and a generalized view (as opposed to satellite imagery). However, there are exceptions to this. When setting the initial zoom, ...


2

Let me answer some of your questions and then I'll talk about some pitfalls with an example. Could this confuse the user? Will he start looking for other places on this map? A map widget will not confuse a user. It will offer more clarity to the user on how to find your shop, look for things to do near your shop and other local facilities and ...


2

Are there any recommendations on best usability practices for an animated map with isometric projections of buildings? From a cartographic perspective, you should follow the same guidelines as working on a regular web map. From what I can tell, you have most of them. I would consider a few things though: Zoom and Pan This is something that while it ...


2

I visited the site. http://thebambergergroup.com/ A few suggestions: Make the map 'draggable' via click+hold+drag. Also, make it "zoomable" via scroll-wheel mouse. Create map load sequence - On a clean canvas, load the buildings FIRST. Then load the map underneath. This way, people know immediately that houses are not baked onto the map and potentially ...


2

Not bored, but overwhelmed. The more colors that are on your map the harder it will be for your user to differentiate what the colors define. If you take your current map, your user has 3(ish) colors to decipher. Red for a large cluster of items, an orange-yellowish for a medium size of clusters, and a green for a small number of clusters. This is a good ...


2

You would want to use multi-variate map to display the same and you don't necessarily need to use colors to define all attributes as you can use symbols also or a combination of both. Here is an example of a bivariate map... This is also useful: http://indiemapper.com/app/learnmore.php?l=multivariate


1

You might find that getting the zoom level for the map is awkward depending on how dense the streets of the town or city are, so would be good to let the user change this (pinch to zoom etc). However it could be solved just by showing a interactive map with just that pin on it if the user taps the map. Another small thing is handling how the user might get ...


1

You should look at (Google's) inbox for touch screen implementation of hover. There are a lot of hover control in inbox. You hover over the icon, they turn into checkboxes, you hover over title, more option button shows, etc etc... In short, they replace hover with one touch (tap), and replace click with two touch (two taps). I'm replicating this ...


1

TL;DR It depends on what you want your user to do with the map. I made suggestions in the "Summary" portion below. Long Answer What is considered a good size and position? (minimum) Honestly, this depends on what you want your user to do with the map. One thing you always need to keep asking yourself is What is the purpose of this page?. Is it to ...


1

You could try using a slide up drawer? Kind of like this one from Google Maps? http://cdn.pttrns.com/377/3927_f.jpg If you could solve the issue with displaying the number of events in the icon, maybe that might make the issue of navigation drawers irrelevant?


1

You might want to take a look at how the Google Maps app tackles this on a phone. If you want to see it in action, I've recorded a small video from my phone: Google Maps search results UI on Android [youtube.com] In my opinion, it's the best way to execute that kind of feature. Small note: On the first time, Maps shows a small "tooltip" to indicate that ...


1

Would something like this work: The idea is the main circle has up to 3 time minutes displayed to show a quick look of what the different times are for travelling. On click, or perhaps on hover, 3 circles expand out showing the different travelling times for the different modes of transport. This is just an example and would need refining.


1

I faced a similar problem and solved it by extending the Google Maps Marker Cluster Library and using pie charts as suggested by BDD instead of the default cluster marker that comes with the library. You can download the solution from my GitHub repository: https://github.com/hassanlatif/chart-marker-clusterer


1

The better solution is to display markers which are aligned to the map scale. Map creates the context for the markers, so when map is zoomed-out, it has no sense for user to see separate markers, as at the given scale exact locations are lost within the large geographical area. Remember, the marker itself is the mean to point to exact location. So be ...



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