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77

People who turn on the TV on election night expect to see the map of their country and see which states voted which way. Those who actually follow the elections and have at least some very basic knowledge of what's going on, also know which are the important states to watch, and they can find them easily on the geographic map. Even those who aren't that ...


31

Interesting graphic - the US looks quite funny. But I think a geographic representation is still best way because of: The viewer is interested in what state has elected and which party. This is best shown in a geographical correct map as you are used to know where a state is situated. It is obvious, that the USA is shown. No need for explaining a strange ...


22

The point is that the map is intended as an at-a-glance throwaway space filler that does it's job simply and efficiently and for all viewers. Of course, that's not to say there's no place for maps with more information, but there's no point in doing that unless you can provide a way for the user to interact with the map in a meaningful manner that allows ...


10

The fact is, it doesn't matter what you think. You shouldn't disable scroll wheel zoom just because it's better for you because you are not your typical user. For those using Google Maps embedded into your page, users are going to have have some pre-conceived expectations of how it should behave - i.e. they expect it to behave like Google Maps in its normal ...


7

You are probably asking this because your into implementing it as a developer. The API of the most used map, Google Maps, call these needles for "markers". I'd guess this is the most technically correct word to use. Reference: Google Maps API Markers However I guess your target audience isn't developers and in there daily life call the needles "Pins". And ...


5

The best map I have seen is by Chris Howard. It combines population density and partisan lean using color:


4

You have to chose between two User Experience options: speed vs. feature. As it happens I'm in the current situation as well at work. We have a landing page with a lot of features, making it extremely heavy to load, and in production the infrastructure could be better. So what do we do? Use cache as far as we can take it, reducing loading time - because the ...


4

I recently worked on an app that had a feature that allowed the user to search or browse for clinics nearby. One thing I got from the tests is that the map view works great mainly for visually displaying (quickly) what is nearby the user. They can process that much faster via the map/pin UI. However, if the user is looking for more information or browsing, ...


4

There's quite a bit of research on cartography on the web, but most of it is not recent. The Commission on Maps and The Internet has published two books on the topic. While I haven't used the material personally, it might be of some use to you.


4

Default Location: The app can ask the user to narrow down a default location, or this could perhaps be queried from the device being used. For example, in the absence of GPS or GEO IP I may have previously specified that I am in "Seattle, WA", or just "Washington", but maybe just "United States". This would allow you to zoom in onto a specific location. ...


3

Instead of a circle, how about highlighting the neighbourhood or the post office for a given zip code area. Another alternative (depending on the context), the (main) train station for the area. Clustered items can be presented by a “mulitple items version” of the default marker icon and all sub-elements listed in a bubble or somewhere outside the map.


3

There is a half way house between the plain geographic map that lead's republicans to think they won (or should have won) because more of the map is red and the continuous cartogram featured in the question. This is the discontinuous cartogram where the sizes of the states is modified to represent the population (or number of electoral college votes, etc). ...


3

For a number of reasons outlined by Brad Frost here I would vote for 'static, and clickable' to launch the default map app on the mobile device. Edit to provide more detail: Brad Frost proposes conditional loading to serve up the best map in the right context. Embed the map if the screensize is appropriate, otherwise serve up a static image which links to ...


3

Drag-n-drop is traditionally done with left-click. However, for you, mousedown, move, mouseup is for dragging (these are the elementary events) Usually, click is to select a place. On Google Maps, if you click on a label, an icon or a result balloon, it select its corresponding place. On Nokia Maps, if you click on an icon or a result balloon, it selects ...


3

Make each vertex selectable and have a Delete menu item, perhaps along with the delete key as an accelerator. If you need to distinguish selecting a vertex from selecting the whole polygon, then either have a separate visible "handle" for selecting the whole polygon or have a separate tool for polygon and vertex actions. The selection-menu syntax allows ...


3

I'd seriously question whether you need a precise location or not. Knowing that someone was born in say "Paris, France" would most likely be enough for almost any use. In addition most people don't know exactly where they were born, but do know the town / city level. If town / city is enough detail for you, then simply ask for the country they were born ...


3

I'd question the use of using the right-click for actually adding content. If you look at most vector based drawing tools, the left click is always the primary action, right click being the secondary and/or contextual menu. In this case, I'd say left click should add a new vertices, unless you are already clicking on an existing node, in which case it will ...


3

I find most map implementations where this is included inherently bad, and (having worked with Google Maps for five years or so) generally I regret that Google Maps introduced it. The problem is not so much that the mousewheel controls zoom, but that it can get in the way. If you scroll down a page in such a way that a map turns up under the cursor, not ...


3

In general my opinion is to not break the current pattern unless necessary. Consistency is always key. Therefore I think that if you're overriding the default scroll behavior of just panning up and down that there should be some serious thought behind it and usability testing to back it up. My thoughts would be if you're panning content in some direction ...


3

I think the main problem with the current design is the visual separation between the textual search option and the geolocation option. You are giving the user a choice between these two search methods but not presenting them together in the same place. The text search option is displayed prominently at the top and is easy to recognise but the geolocation ...


3

The obvious answer is to render the elephants standing on the turtle's back, but there are other options. Having the map snap back to fit to the edge on zoom out could be confusing, as the user will expect the zoom at the edge to behave in the same way as zoom in the middle. You could however make the map slowly drift back to fill the empty space. A ...


2

Asking for patterns and precedents to emulate is going to be quite hit and miss, because there is no universal pattern for zooming. There are many different ways of implementing this sort of behaviour, each with advantages and disadvantages for different use-cases. Without knowing what sorts of information you present, how your users expect to navigate it ...


2

If the user can drag vertices around the map, then one way to get rid of a vertex is to drag it on top of an adjacent one. While that's being done, the connecting line reduces to zero length and landing one vertex on top of another to merge them is the logical conclusion.


2

This is a tough one. Requiring the exact position where a user was born is both difficult and spooky —you might as well ask for their blood type! But for the question's sake we will asume users will be ok with getting their birth certificates and checking the hospital where they were born. I would build a form that would go from simple to complex depending ...


2

Don't forget to take the location and audience into consideration. Is the location reached from two or more popular starting points? Does your audience regularly use native map applications on their mobile device? Precede the map with some simplified, locally relevant directions. From the I-10 Freeway South Take Shea Blvd. Exit Right on ...


2

Established convention for scroll wheel map zooming is a strong argument. But... I have bad personal experience with scroll wheel map zooming, too. The problem is map zooming occurs instead of needed content scrolling. The app displays bus route on the map and trip details on the right panel. The map doesn't provide rich interaction, I'd say it is rather ...


2

There is no such pattern. Special difficulty is in touchscreen, because in other case you can show hide icon on hover. I suppose clicking on pin shows some popover with information about pin — so to solve the problem add there "Hide pin" button/link. Also don't forget to add on map control panel button with text similar to "Restore hidden pins (XX)" (XX is ...


2

Pros: Your design would be intuitive if it had manual search built in. Here is one very typical use case: I am searching for things around a location that I will be at later. I'm not familiar with what the location looks like on a map. I don't know what part of town it is in, but I know the cross streets. Cons: more coding hours. Verdict: Build the ...


2

As Franchesca suggested, you could fill the empty space with an empty pattern or you could tile the map... thus creating an infinite continuous 2D space where when you reach one end, you end up at the other, which is similar to what happens on a surface of a sphere. I do not suggest snapping the point of view back into the area of the mapped world, as ...


2

Firstly with Google Maps there are two routes to a location search box browse map If an location information is always displayed same place regardless of the route used to find it this is a UX win in terms of Consistency heuristic. Secondly note that in Google maps the linear menu changes. This means that a radial menu would alter. And thus any ...



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