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12

Apple removed scrollbars from appearing, unless in use, from viewports in 2011 with the release of Lion, immediately sparking multiple articles about how to get them back. The usability rationale and merit of this can still be debated today. Not showing it until it is needed is a clean design and does not clutter the display, but the user must figure out ...


4

In the original MacOS versions (pre-10), there was a close button in the top left and maximize (if available) in the top right, as shown here: Putting them together seems like a reasonable choice to tidy up the interface. So, perhaps the real question is why was the close button in the top left corner originally? My best guess: Mac users use Command-Q ...


3

Unless your app has a clear character or you have a brand font (Spotify for example), using the system font will make you fit in the system better. It's best to make layouts independent of font size, because those layouts will break for every change in text too.


3

Should a Mac app ask the user permission for gathering data about their hardware? Could be reworded as: Should an app ask the user permission before gathering data? To instill trust with the user, yes, absolutely.


3

Steve Jobs was fairly inspired by Xerox's Xerox Star, which was the first to introduce a User Interface in their system. Demo video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QYvxgNhUwBk Xerox's Xerox Star was poorly marketed, and hence wasn't well known. With the inspiration of the Xerox Star, Apple launched Mac OS 1.0 and placed the Window Commands/Actions to the ...


2

I would say that it is becoming very common if this is not already the case. Microsoft has been marketing the Surface Pro on all fronts, to the extent that it can be seen to have the processing capabilities of a desktop machine. You will find that the single OS/multiple device strategy for Windows that plagued the desktop users a little bit with Windows 10 ...


2

Yes, it’s a mess and there’s no easy way out. The international standard ISO/IEC 9995-7 specifies several symbols for keyboard labels. Most of them have been added to Unicode and exist in at least one supplied font on most modern operating systems, by the way. They are known to a varying, mostly limited degree. Power users, who are the primary target group ...


2

What you're collecting is the same as "System Requirements". You could actually make that part of the initial installation process, rather than a "hidden call home". Example: Installation is complete. In an effort to improve our software, we'd like to save the following information to our database OS: Yosemite 10.1.1 RAM: 16G Foo: Bar ------------------- ...


2

I don't know if there is a standard for this, so I am strictly speaking from personal opinion but I would say since the app is meant for system monitoring it is fairly obvious that you will be collecting information about the system. The worry of the user won't be the collecting but rather the distributing of such information. Therefore, to address those ...


2

This is determined by whether the action is bulk (will be performed on more than 1 item) or individual (will be performed on each item at a time). As you can see, compress will act on all selected items, whilst duplicate will act on each item separately. So the copy of bulk actions changes based on the selection, where that of individual items doesn't. ...


2

They are very small, which is very frustrating, and so the likelihood of accidentally clicking on one of them is also relatively low. This is both a negative, and a positive. Hence the question you ask (what benefits outweigh the negatives). Minimizing and maximizing are not the most common functions. Usually you open or close tabs, change between tabs, or ...


1

Your question has an answer in another UX question, Your desktop application, if it is built on system controls (not with it's own graphic style entirely) should use system font to be compliant to OS guidelines (weither it is Windows, Mac OS or Unix derivative OS) It is important to know what it is built for. If it uses a system controls to primarily ...


1

The window management buttons are not the primary way of managing windows. They are a convenience shortcut that you can choose to use or not if you find them convenient or not. They are small to keep them out of the way because they are secondary and because window management is not the primary task the user is performing in any given window. The primary ...


1

From the uses I'm familiar with on OS X, force click isn't really synonymous with secondary click at all (which pretty much always brings up a context menu), but with actions that Apple have previously mapped to (awkward, imho) three-finger gestures. That is, quick look, dictionary lookup, etc. So your question might actually be, "conceptually, what does ...


1

Always push the state to your service when it changes. Your service should simply not accept state changes that transition from an older then stored state to their current state. In this situation a status response should indicate that a newer state is available and the application should sync. Make opening a book a state change and everything should just ...


1

With Kindle, synchronisation just happens, and it is very useful. Occasionally, my Kindle asks me if I want to sync to furthest page read, and my immediate thought is always "of course I do, why are you asking me?" I cannot think of a use case for not synchronising across devices, except perhaps when the user is connected via 3G instead of wifi or 4G. If ...


1

Is there a reason they're on the left? Yes. It's that the ultimate button in this little micro "dialog" box (Window title bar) is the destructive action of closing the window, and Apple determined the ideal order of actions to be from left to right: | Destructive || Neutral || Constructive | Since the button on the far left closes the window, and is ...


1

Users of mac have faith in the ecosystem. They believe in transparency. This faith is the most valuable thing we have in this ecosystem. Therefore we should not let this faith fade away. We should protect this ecosystem. As DA01 mentioned to instill the faith it is absolutely necessary. Also as this feature adds value to the user, he will never get annoyed ...


1

I feel that an error alert is not the best use of the menu-bar popover. Most applications I know of use this mechanism as a menu: The user keeps the icon in the menu bar because it shows some sort of information, and clicks on it to access further information and actions. I think the typical OS X model would work something like this: Menu Bar Icon: has ...


1

Can you elaborate on why you need to show the user an error-message? Under what circumstances is it, that you think this is a right solution? I'm not saying you are wrong, but I'm curious to the peripherals of this "problem"



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