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21

The green button isn't for maximizing. If you want to maximize, use the "fullscreen" button in the upper right of the window: The zoom button is intended to make the window the best possible size that shows the most of the window's content. This is the most useful when working with multiple windows, because you see as much as your screen will hold, but it ...


18

The window expands to fit the content, and don't add additional whitespace like windows OS does. Now let’s look at Apple’s website in Safari. Notice the first image below is a very small window with both vertical and horizontal scrollbars. The second image shows what the window looks like after clicking the Zoom button. Again, it takes up all of the ...


14

Two thoughts that come immediately to mind is to include a slider that is always at 100%, and allow the user to adjust the size of different segments. Allow the user to add, or remove, segments as needed. Another option might be to do the same with your graph. A slider plus a pie chart is visually busy, so why not combine the two? Be careful of ...


5

Maintaining 100% will be impossible without adjusting other sectors any time the user changes something. That is likely to be confusing. Perhaps you could use visual feedback to show the unallocated amount or overflow. Instead of a pie chart, show a progress bar with a segment for each amount. If the total is less than 100% show the unallocated amount at ...


4

Apple has created the OS X Human Interface Guidelines, which describes the user interface, and other aspects, ought to behave on OS X. Moreso than Microsoft or other companies, Apple strongly encourages developers to follow these guidelines and I believe that OS X users have an underlying assumption, whether they realize it or not, that an app they use will ...


4

First, I think a better name for what you are asking about is mouse pointer, not mouse cursor. For me cursor evokes the mouse-unrelated text input positioner (as in the Terminal or text editor cursor that you move around with the cursor keys). Why isn't the pointer choice on clickable areas a Pointing Hand Finger which suggests an area to click on? ...


4

Some small issues about the current UI: The destination is before the source. The first dropdown has "---" pre-filled, but not the other one. The "Setup Enterprise Automatically" checkbox is not clear. You explain it right below but as a user, I would expect the whole setup to be done automatically. I would use such a phrase on a button, not a checkbox. ...


3

Its because Apple explicitly mentions in its Human Interface Guidelines that all software providers should provide all functions available with a single click and they dont see any use case for providing a right click. That said it does support an option to have a secondary click as shown below which brings up the contextual menu Now coming to the reason ...


3

The device reports its Capacity in base-2, whereas 32 GB is the capacity in base-10. You can see 32 GB as an easy to remember number which represents your particular iOS device model. Apple recently changed OS X to report disk sizes and file sizes in base-10. I don't know why Apple didn't change reporting of iOS devices capacity to base-10 as well. I ...


3

In addition to the cut and paste option mentioned above, you can also right-click to cut and paste. As you can see from the screencap there are both cut and past options. Cut will dim the text of an icon until it is pasted elsewhere, at which time it moves the item to the new location. Dim text indicates the item has been cut.


3

Microsoft and Apple have slightly different UI guidelines, which I think you should adhere to. It may be important to note that the latest OS X Human Interface Guide hints a near-future shift towards touch supportive desktop interfaces. Which, if complied with, could mean a radical application redesign. The same is also already true for windows 8 ...


3

Just so it's explicit, the full list of default point sizes for type in OS X is as follows: 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 18, 24, 36, 48, 64, 72, 96, 144, 288 There are two competing historical reasons why this set was probably chosen. Before System 7 (released in 1997), all fonts on the Mac were bitmap fonts, rather than TrueType outline fonts (chiefly because ...


2

Dropdowns are good if there are a lot of items (it seems like it's not your case). Radio buttons are good choice if there are just a few of options (or any visual similar kind of controls). There is no need to show a control at all if only one singe item is available (like only one USB drive is plugged in: a majority of cases I believe) Try to avoid ...


2

The documentation on bevel buttons states that they are being deprecated: Note: Bevel buttons are not recommended for use in apps that run in OS X v10.7 and later. You should consider alternatives, such as gradient buttons and segmented controls (described in “Gradient Button” and “Segmented Control,” respectively). That aside, I see no issue ...


2

Apple design guidelines state: Discoverability. Encourage your users to discover functionality by providing cues about how to use user interface elements. If an element is clickable, for example, it must appear that way, or a user may never try clicking it. The idea is that clickable elements should be recognised as such without hover. This is even ...


2

Hopefully the mock is comprehensible enough: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups (the values below graph are obviously made up) The white dots (could be replaced with some more intuitive symbols) would be draggable and as in the result, the range's values would change. Optionally, clicking on a value would make it ...


1

The mice that come with Macs today have effectively more than one button, a press on one side is considered the primary button and the other side the secondary button. The primary button is associated with selecting and dragging and activating (with double click), the secondary button usually pops up a context dependent menu. Earlier Macs had only one ...


1

What you need is the ability to have over and under allocation so they don't have to micro manage every element, yet also prevent them from leaving before their total is 100%. Combining the pie graph with your list view and adding an indicator of "available percentage" at the bottom of your list will allow them to manage things either way. What I think is ...


1

Your application should meet the expectations of your users. If your users are Mac users, then you should follow their expectations for how Mac applications should behave. The interaction design of your existing Windows application isn't as important as the interaction design that users expect. One of the major strengths of the Mac platform is the ...


1

You should create the application that your target users need. This means that you should understand why Mac users would want to use your application, what competing products exist on the platform, and how your product would fit into their current usage. Additionally, you should understand whether your target Mac users would also have experience with your ...


1

Mac users can deal with complex UI, like Adobe and Maya. Windows users appreciate streamlined interfaces as much as Mac users. When porting to Mac, it is essential that you have genuine Mac UI person on your team, who understands specifics. Some typical issues are: Macs have different common menu layout and keyboard scheme. Make sure your Preferences and ...


1

Having a simple UI does not need to mean a loss of functionality, it means a prioritization of functionality. I would suggest "focusing a fresh approach", as you said, and when you do so, start with the following: List all your desired functionality and features. Distinguish between the two. Functions are transparent to a user, while the features fit into ...


1

Your question really hinges on two things: 1. What level of exposure have your users had to the conventional schema (i.e., left-to-right) 2. Are you breaking your users' expectations by deviating from the norm. The first point is probably most readily highlighted by the QWERTY vs. DVORAK keyboard problem. If you were to introduce a new user to a DVORAK ...


1

I don't know and cannot find evidence of entire companies making such a switch. I tend to see a couple of scenarios: Totally invested in a Windows or Linux based platform with a bunch of proprietary software and unable to make the switch even if they wanted to. Having to support numerous novices with everything and therefore stuck on Windows for support ...



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