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73

You're introducing two big problems right off the bat; breaking conventions and clashing styles. Don't forget that Apple and Microsoft have released different interface guidelines for their respective platforms : Windows UX Guidelines and the OS X UX Guidelines. Using conventions is important and helps users work in your app without thinking (Don't Make Me ...


37

The users experience in your application should fit with the experience they have come to understand and work within in their chosen (or forced upon) OS. They have built laws and rules of interaction on that experience, for good or bad. A major drawback with designing an app to look more like OS X UI than Windows 7 or Vista UI is that the overall look and ...


27

Update: In Mac OS X 10.10 Yosemite and later, it seems the zoom button has been replaced by the fullscreen button. The green widget no longer contains a plus sign, but two outward-pointing arrows, and places the window in fullscreen mode. To zoom a window, you now option-click this button. The green button isn't for maximizing. If you want to maximize, ...


22

The window expands to fit the content, and don't add additional whitespace like windows OS does. Now let’s look at Apple’s website in Safari. Notice the first image below is a very small window with both vertical and horizontal scrollbars. The second image shows what the window looks like after clicking the Zoom button. Again, it takes up all of the ...


14

Two thoughts that come immediately to mind is to include a slider that is always at 100%, and allow the user to adjust the size of different segments. Allow the user to add, or remove, segments as needed. Another option might be to do the same with your graph. A slider plus a pie chart is visually busy, so why not combine the two? Be careful of ...


10

The main issue is that you break learned patterns and conventions. You are a mac user, so – naturally – you find your way around iTunes' interface, on whatever platform it may be running. The users of the app, however, will most likely be windows users. They have learned the design principles and gui conventions windows offers, and will have an easy time ...


10

What mouse acceleration essentially does is applies a sort of logarithmic scale to the distance moved per milisecond based on the speed you are moving at. The general concept is that when you are moving the mouse faster, you are trying to move it to a point further away, so acceleration scaled the distance the pointer will move to be even more than you ...


9

Windows already lets you know what is the key equivalent by underlining a letter, e.g. in the dialog below, pressing Alt-F would be the same as clicking on the Find button: In Windows 3.1, the corresponding letter was always underlined. Starting with Windows XP, I think, the underlines no longer appear until you press the Alt key. On the Mac, you could ...


8

There is Tab Candy http://www.azarask.in/blog/post/tabcandy/


8

What Apple decided to do with the "Cut and Paste" procedure in Windows is simply to combine them into one action, Move. Or: drag = move option+drag=copy With OSX the user applies direct manipulation by dragging a file or a group of files between folders, rather than selecting and cutting them out into some virtual un-graspable medium. Whether it ...


8

Its because Apple explicitly mentions in its Human Interface Guidelines that all software providers should provide all functions available with a single click and they dont see any use case for providing a right click. That said it does support an option to have a secondary click as shown below which brings up the contextual menu Now coming to the reason ...


7

This has been in OSX for ages, as luxun said, it used to be visible when you enabled keyboard navigation for all controls. Basically, the Return key performs the least destructive/safest action, spacebar the most destructive. Eg: In case of a file save dialog, perhaps triggered by closing an application with unsaved changes, return will save, space will ...


7

This is not unique to Mac OS. Windows 7 'pinned' applications, and Ubuntu app bar both have this same problem. While technically it would be nice to have a 'Cancel Launch' choice if you right clicked, the practical issue is that terminating a program mid launch is dangerous; the programmer who wrote the application is very unlikely to expect you to change ...


7

Even if a user is an expert, Fitts' law applies. Fitts' law doesn't refer to finding/identifying the target so much as how long it takes to hit it. Even after a user has developed muscle and spatial memory for where to move the cursor, a larger target that's closer to the cursor is still going to be quicker to hit than a smaller one further away (if only ...


7

I think the answer to whether the destructive "delete" should be the default action or not highly depends on the context in which the dialog occurs. If the dialog was the result of an action that expresses a clear destructive intent, like for example clicking "empty trash", the user probably knows what the consequences are, so it makes most sense to have the ...


6

From that one example, and from these: It would appear that the octagonal icon is used when it is reporting an event that has occurred, and it is too late to do anything about it. This would be different from a triangular alert icon, which appears when you are being asked to do something with some caution.


6

The drawback is that it looks and behave like an OSX app on a windows machine. It would be equally bad to make an Android app that looks and behaves like an IOS app. Or a windows game that behaves like an console game. Each system has their conventions that you need to design around. It doesn't mean you need to stick to their established aesthetic, but it ...


6

What you have seems pleasant enough. Assuming that you've disabled the options that can't work or (at the very least) display the same error when they try to use the options then this should be OK. You could try replacing the "More Info..." with "How to fix..." (or words to that effect). At the moment it's not clear (to me) what I'd need to do to sort out ...


6

With this issue I would suggest to always stick with the way that Safari natively renders the drop down menu. This is what Safari users are already use to, and therefore the behaviour they expect. If a user has a screen with high enough resolution to show the whole list in that manner then you are effectively saving them time from having to scroll through a ...


6

First, I think a better name for what you are asking about is mouse pointer, not mouse cursor. For me cursor evokes the mouse-unrelated text input positioner (as in the Terminal or text editor cursor that you move around with the cursor keys). Why isn't the pointer choice on clickable areas a Pointing Hand Finger which suggests an area to click on? ...


6

it's a status bar. it's not specific to osx, all browsers have one. it used to show the url of hovered links, status of requests, etc and then some add-ons/plugins started using it to show information. Recently it's been reduced to a something like a tooltip in most browsers (it only appears on mouse over links or when something is loading, etc).


5

I for one, don't know why so much emphasis is put on logo and name. In the absolute majority of cases where I've opened the About-box, I wanted to know what version number I had. I suggest emphasizing this.


5

You have a couple of other options to: when the site loads make the scroll bar visible for 3-5 seconds, then make it go away, it will probably make the user focus on that area you could always put an arrow down to symbolize the more option for that panel and try to integrate the arrow within the pane with the items so that when the user goes over it it ...


5

Mac does support Copy as well as Cut as explained above. The only difference is how they are perceived. On Windows and other environments, users need to decide before taking an action whether they want to copy content or move content. Paste is a simple activity that depends on the previous action taken. It has a usability flaw which is evident in an example ...


5

Chrome does this pretty well; it quietly shows a little up arrow icon over the "menu" icon (oddly I couldn't find an image of this). When you click the "update" icon it lets you know you should restart Chrome to let it update. If you naturally close Chrome at any point it will (very quietly and quickly) update. Since updates generally aren't so important ...


5

Maintaining 100% will be impossible without adjusting other sectors any time the user changes something. That is likely to be confusing. Perhaps you could use visual feedback to show the unallocated amount or overflow. Instead of a pie chart, show a progress bar with a segment for each amount. If the total is less than 100% show the unallocated amount at ...


4

See Apple's Human Interface Guidelines. It suggests keeping the About box sparse. It should definitely include: application branding, such as a logo the full application name and version number (the version number should be the same as the version number displayed by the Finder) It also suggests a brief description of what the application ...


4

Apple is probably a good example to emulate in this case. The default about box (with the app icon, version number, and copyright) doesn't offer many extra 'goodies', but things like release history and upcoming features are probably not necessary. The "About Finder" window and the "About This Mac" window are probably a good middle ground. It's worth ...


4

Don't confuse your users, use Mac-style UI on a Mac and Windows-style UI on Windows. The problem with having dialog sheets on Windows is that some people don't have any experience on Macs and don't care about UI widgets on other platform, so the dialog sheet in your application will be completely new to them - and they are likely to be a little bit confused ...


4

Enter triggers the blue button, spacebar the one with the blue outline. I don't think this is bad usability because it doesn't change the standard behavior and allows advanced users to be faster. This used to be a setting under "Keyboard", in Lion there doesn't seem to be a way to turn it off though.



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