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15

In my previous job, a big part in recruiting new employees was to test their business sense. We got a lot of UI and UX designers that wanted to focus on the new and nifty, rather than the true and tested aspects of the web. When faced with questions where they would need to make a choice, the ones that stood out most were those who were able to get over ...


11

The main reason for the guidelines on all the OSes for application developers is so that they can maintain a look and feel of the app which is quite similar to OS itself. This is one of the reasons why you should use the system controls and widgets as far as possible, rather than reinventing your own style. With that in mind, it is always in your interest ...


10

I am going to break this response down into two parts : Following design principles : The fact that you are redesigning your own personal website allows you creative freedom with regards to how you want to convey information or content. However you must note that your website is often used as determine your design skills or even your UX skills with ...


4

The article confuses real 3D with superficial 3D effects. Windows 7 is not really "3D" in any meaningful sense. Rather, it is a 2D interface with some superficial styling cues that appear 3D. Windows 8 removes these 3D-looking elements. This is what is meant when they talk about "getting flatter"--switching from one style to another. It is purely a ...


3

Jared Spool has a great article on this topic which makes the point that users don't so much dislike change itself as being made to feel suddenly stupid. That means it's more about the specific changes you make than about how you unveil them. It's probably worth noting that Spool is, in the article, rejecting an article by Aaron Sedley at Google about their ...


3

If there's a direct correlation between the software and the OS it runs on, then yes, it makes perfect sense that--at least by default--some level of parity should be created in the UIs. If there's not a direct correlation, then it's a bit trickier. If your app runs on iOS5 and iOS7, they really are entirely different visual styles, but it's one app, so ...


3

Sidebars are superior due to a lot of reasons. They are not new, they have been here for a while, especially used in content&structure rich interfaces (Gmail, MS Outlook or almost any mail or multi-PIM application, folder list in file managers like Total Commander, Forklift or even built-in Windows Explorer or Finder, iTunes...). More and more ...


2

Most designers would rather give up designing than blindly copy someone else. Copycat design There are few things to consider when you copy: You are always 2nd. You are aware of the latest trends but you do not make trends. Majority doesn't mean that the solution to the problem is right. If you copy why should the user choose you and not other ...


2

I think being radical is what good design is about, but not in terms of just visual cues. Take a look at this tweet from Jason Fried: Its about what a particular thing is, and not what it does. Using industry standard design elements helps the user recognise objects, but how you're using those elements is what sets you apart.


2

Answer to this question is spread over two domains. User Experience Brand Strategy If App's look and feel is not iOS7 like and it is run on iOS7, by and large this wouldn't affect usability but can affect user-experience as user can find variation between UI controls. However this style noise is inevitable and would remain there for several years to ...


2

In my opinion, your administrative user are going to be handful, compared to the end users who are actually going to take the survey, so I would say, concentrate more on the UX of the end users. Again building a custom UX for a handful of admins means doing a lot of extra work. Moreover the admins who as you said are the customers are looking at how the ...


2

It's good for the front end and back end interfaces to have some degree of parity from a branding point of view (particularly since in your particular example, the same users will potentially see both interfaces) but that's not to say they should have exactly the same look and feel. They are after all serving different purposes and aimed at (initially) ...


1

A proposal has been made to revamp the entire UI from scratch. The end result will be something totally different from the existing one Based on your question as per my personal experience it will be better to make it step by step rather then the whole transformation at once. Because you never know if the some of the features of your app would work ...


1

depending on time scales and budget you could try a combination of both. start by inviting trusted, regular users to try out your new design and give feedback then act of this feedback to improve your new designs next start migrating a subset of your users onto the new design, giving them plenty of notice and the option to switch back again analyse usage ...


1

For starters, the article seems to be mashing up 3 concepts: 3D effects vs. no effects (iOS's 'bubbles and drop shadows' vs. Win8's 'flat everywhere' aesthetics) 2D vs. 3D interfaces (Your standard computer OS UI vs. your favorite 3D FPS) 2D vs. 3D screens (iPhone vs. Nintendo 3DS) All interesting topics, but they are all really separate topics and not ...


1

The point of your Web site is to encourage someone to do business with you. You want to portray authority and an established membership in your market. The sites allows you to support an argument that those are two of your qualities. Common design elements No, using design elements isn't unethical. We use common elements to portray our affinity for or ...


1

What about: Know your users first. Which features are the most popular and what users are expecting from your app? Break down your UI into blocks (forms, fonts, modals, etc) regardless of the old/new features difference. Prioritize "new" UI framework implementation workload by balancing 1. and 2.


1

Transition from old to new can and mostly is always hard because you need to justify the cost vs. benefit. And I totally agree with the consistency, not only in the look and feel but also in the way that elements behave in a website, ege. all datagrids should behave similarly. You have to find a balance in between. You must have style-sheets and as a first ...


1

I tend to keep the look and feel consistent in the sense that (spurious example) the left of two buttons will always be the affirmative button, or the right, but never a mix. Beyond that, the UI should focus on allowing the user to complete their workflow as painlessly as possible, where painlessly means accurately and quickly. That could differ in your ...



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