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134

Option 2 is the best option, because you'll recognize your own language regardless of your knowledge of other languages (be sure to also provide charactersets if you support for example japanese) Problems with options 1 and 3 Option 1. If you don't speak / understand the current language you may not recognize your own language. In the example germans would ...


92

Option 2 is the way to go as you should always show languages listed by the way they are written in that language. It is the way both Wikipedia and most companies that deal in many languages do it. Here is how Apple handle it: Problems with the other options Option 1 is a headache to maintain as you need to have the name of every language in every other ...


39

Perhaps just the opposite of what you wanted but we have in a few cases of municipalities with diverse ethnicities resorted to displaying the top languages by name and adding a globe icon for other translations. You could also try making icons with abbreviations of the language name next the actual name.


25

I see two different questions being asked: how to represent a language, and how to represent a country These are entirely two different things. Representing countries is easier because there is a one-to-one correspondence with flags, you can use an approach similar to this one: For representing languages, I like how the BBC does it, showing the ...


24

There is no good graphical language representation. Flags work in some situations, when there are limited choices (up to 4-5 flags) and no ambiguities. They fail for multilingual countries (e.g. India, China), and can look jarring for multi-country languages (e.g. English, Spanish). ISO 2-letter codes are often confusing and unfamiliar. For instance, BS ...


20

Option 2 is the best, since user can always recognize its own language. There's is a small pitfall though. If you present language selector as dropdown, user won't see any values except current auto-detected language, unless he clicks it. And if user doesn't understand currently selected language - say, already mentioned Chinese, he might won't even notice ...


18

If the browser interface is RTL, everything would be mirrored compared to an LTR interface: As for the second part of your question, I wouldn't phrase it in terms of "good" or "bad" UX. It goes like this: Usability and cognition Part of usability is efficiency, which by many definitions involves (amongst others) the mental effort users have to expend ...


16

As much as it pains me to say it (as a Brit), if you're not going to have any localisation go with American spellings. This will be the preferred spellings for the vast majority of users - either as native speakers (Americans far outnumber the British) or as second language speakers (though there are significant number of those who use British English ...


15

If you're going to bother localizing your interface, you might as well do it fully and respect the language or region's common practices. As you mention localization, I assume this means that you will change the placement of the currency symbol based on the locale setting of the user's interface, rather than the locale of the currency symbol used. Take ...


15

The trivial, most general answer is that sorting by last name makes sense when users are matching based on last names and sorting by first name makes sense when users are matching based on first names. Of course, this gets you absolutely nowhere because the hard part is figuring out which is likely to be the case! It's not possible to do this ...


14

The problems with this approach are: You're choosing languages to demonstrate this that have an arguably stronger association with specific countries, so the solution seems better than it is. You are also assuming that everyone that speaks Spanish knows what the Spanish flag looks like, which is not necessarily true. Someone from Nicaragua doesn't have ...


14

First, I would blog about it :). This is a gem, and I don't mean it in a derogatory way, it really is a beautiful case. And in more practical terms - benchmarking. Look at other chinese websites, see how they solve this issue. I know that chinese elevators say 1-2-3-3A-5, or alternatively 1-2-3-5-6. This is not a solution in this case, since your problem is ...


14

I think a user using an app like that (text rendered with no accents when accents are expected) would find it to be very unprofessional. As the accents play an important role in the language, leaving them out could: Cause users to just passed off as bad grammar. Change the meaning of what you are trying to convey. Look like gibberish. As for languages ...


14

Yes, it matters (especially in parts of the world where week numbers are important). There are three main calendar formats defining the starting day of the week; Monday (used by most of Europe and the rest of the world that adheres to ISO-8601), Saturday (used by much of the Middle East), and Sunday (used in North America and Israel): Image from Wikipedia ...


13

Source - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decimal_mark In Albania, Belgium, Bosnia, Estonia, France, Finland, Hungary, Poland, Czech Republic, Slovakia and much of Latin Europe as well as French Canada: 1 234 567,89 (In Spain, in handwriting it is also common to use an upper comma: 1.234.567'89) In Brazil, Germany, Netherlands, Denmark, Italy, ...


13

Its going to be really hard to respond to this question unless we can see a screenshot of what your interface or site currently looks like. However here are some reasons as to why you are not getting a 100% right to left F shaped pattern for your site: Your interface might not be totally right justified as explained by this article : Our usability ...


11

As a UX analyst for multinational companies in the Arab world (where we have designed the same sites with an English version and an Arabic version) the UI elements are pretty much the same. There is no difference between using a drop-down combo box here or there or whether radio buttons work somewhere but don't work for others. We have noticed however that ...


11

What you're looking for is called a 'Locale' (a more technical term) or 'Region settings' (better to understand for users). As some countries and regions share the same format it might be a better approach to ask the user what looks familiar to them: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups If you need to stick to the UI ...


10

This depends on language, as well as your definition of “accent”. In English, accents are mostly used in words of French origin only, and many people would even find “role” and “fiance” preferable to “rôle” and “fiancé”. On the other hand, in Vietnamese, accents are used heavily, form part of the orthography, and can be essential for uniqueness and ...


10

I am not aware of any heuristics or best practices since there are different use cases depending upon the countries you are designing for. However this excellent article Global by Design : Creating a world-ready web design gives some valuable inputs: Look at the scope of designing a global template (except in unique cases) : A availability of a global ...


9

No. Oranges: 50 is not correct in French. In french, you have to write Oranges : 50, with a non-breaking space before the colon “:”. In traditional print, including in English, we put this non-breaking space. It is nicer.


8

To expand on: You're challenging national identities. If someone is from Austria, they need to choose a German flag. While that may not be a big deal to you, to many Austrians it is. Germany vs. Austria or US vs. GB are relatively harmless examples. I assume in most cases you'd get mild annoyance from the side you didn't choose. But for other countries ...


8

I would make sure the user can see all localizations at once, otherwise you might end up with one variant getting edited without its siblings getting updated to reflect the possible change in translation. So avoid solutions #2 and #3. I'm wondering whether these localized variants are usually required or optional? If they're required, you may want to ...


8

Removing formatting runs the risk of making numbers ambiguous. Currency signs help indicate the size of a figure of money, and have obvious importance for anyone doing business internationally. They also help users pick out money data in long rows of numbers, as it's much easier to look for numbers that begin with symbols than try and follow column headings ...


7

Sorting through a large list of flags has never been helpful to identify your content. Having to identify your specific requirements amidst such a huge plethora of graphics is cute for designers, but unhelpful to users, who, unless they are familiar with the particular icon set and/or every country flag, will have a hard time visually processing and sorting. ...


7

I see that a decision was made on the Design A Language Icon page (as mentioned in the original post). They' gone with this: Apparently, the reasoning behind this is: Why this color? : It is similar to the color of tongue. It is pastel and not disturbing (indeed color options are available but this is our choice). Why this glyph? : Because ...


7

Back to the question where the answer is yes, it improves readability, at least if you listen to Jakob Nielsen who (yet again) wrote an article on 113 Design Guidelines for Homepage Usability where #112 says: 112) Use a thousands separator appropriate to your locale for numbers that have five or more digits. For example, in the United States, fifty-three ...


7

The two fields are part of the same address. (I've never heard your colleague's interpretation before.) Usually the second line is optional. As noted by dnbrv and TJH, in some locations the second line is necessary or helpful. In addition, providing the extra line allows for formatting an address to optimize postal delivery, which is largely driven by ...


7

Whatever you do, telling someone that they can't access certain content is always going to be a poor experience. The only thing that you can really do to deflect the negative feeling is to explain why you can't show it. "... due to US sanctions, we are not legally allowed to show this content in your country" "Copyright agreements with XYZ publisher mean ...


7

You may simply follow the windows operating system way. This last field can be called Date/Number Format and it can be provided as a configurable item at user level.



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