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There's a very good article on UXMatters about filtering information in tables. Although old, it still makes a lot of sense. A few options have been considered, like data filters above a table: filters to the left of the data or tabular format in case the number of filters is low There's also a good discussion about consistent availability and ...


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I find the search box more intuitive for search. However, the text boxes provide a way of advanced filtering. So, the question is - do you want your users to search or filter? If you want both, you may consider the following intermediate solution, Amazon is using the same. Your search box searching all columns by default but the user has the option to ...


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Actually your 1st option is a Filter, while 2nd one is rather a Search. They are just different tools. And both tools are useful. But dealing with large and complex datasets, I'm for 1st option. Per field filters provide more clear mental model. Table explicitly presents the data in highly structured view, which affects user's mental model. They think on ...


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Grids are useful. Here are some tips which I hope are helpful. Grids don't have to look like grids. For example, the border width may be 0, or the border colour may be the same as the background or the fill colour. One drawback of this is that if the content is highly inconsistent in length, users may not perceive a pattern, and may instead see a ...


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For me the only reason to avoid the single search (2nd option) would be to have several columns with similar content, thus leading to an inefficient search. If that's not the case I would totally go with the single search: There's only 1 entry point for search, thus less cognitive load. The users only have to think what to search, not where to search ...



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