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I find the search box more intuitive for search. However, the text boxes provide a way of advanced filtering. So, the question is - do you want your users to search or filter? If you want both, you may consider the following intermediate solution, Amazon is using the same. Your search box searching all columns by default but the user has the option to ...


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For me the only reason to avoid the single search (2nd option) would be to have several columns with similar content, thus leading to an inefficient search. If that's not the case I would totally go with the single search: There's only 1 entry point for search, thus less cognitive load. The users only have to think what to search, not where to search ...


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To start the ball rolling, in my opinion if it is a "preview", it goes below whereas if it is the "actual content or work" it goes above To restate, if you're actually "looking at a list", if a "list is the thing", and it's just a preview of whichever item you have highlighted as you scroll up and down that list - it goes at the bottom. Whereas if it is ...


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There's a very good article on UXMatters about filtering information in tables. Although old, it still makes a lot of sense. A few options have been considered, like data filters above a table: filters to the left of the data or tabular format in case the number of filters is low There's also a good discussion about consistent availability and ...


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Grids are useful. Here are some tips which I hope are helpful. Grids don't have to look like grids. For example, the border width may be 0, or the border colour may be the same as the background or the fill colour. One drawback of this is that if the content is highly inconsistent in length, users may not perceive a pattern, and may instead see a ...



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