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You could only allow the user to add items through the selection screen, and force them to use another, more complex, avenue to remove them. Some ideas for removing: Only letting them remove things at certain times of the day Make them submit a request to remove something, have a fifteen minute or so wait period, then let them remove it Have a puzzle, ...


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You can also think of time limiting the immutable property. Like once a website and max-allowed-time is set, it is immutable for 3 days. User need to wait for 3 days to make any chages. You can also feature limit (display ads or slowdown the site on client side) after max-allowed-time to discourage site usage beyond set time limits.


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Usually it is advisable to enforce the sort, highlight the row and focus on it as answered in your referenced question, but I think the context of this list of yours, has a role in dictating how it should work. How many items are you usually dealing with? If you can see everything on a single page, then the jumping is less of an issue as you won't need to ...


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Just keep it simple, brutha. If you want the text to have more appeal, try contrasting it. You can use contrasting colors, contrasting sizes, and so on. When something "looks good" it normally has high contrast. Big and small, dark and light. Bold + narrow headings, thin/regular text ;)


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Grid views can indeed allow for bigger thumbnails - although not necessarily, as the height of a row on a list view could be the same height as a cell in a grid view. The main differences, IMHO, are: Grid view offers a greater number of thumbnails to the user, at any one time, than list view given the same screen real estate. This is because a list view ...


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I would try to approach your question from a different angle. You should be considering what best pattern/tactic may be to solve the particular design problem. Otherwise you may be getting into the "square peg into round hole" pitfall. You may want to start by considering the mental modal and goals of the user when they are trying to complete whatever ...


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If you are aiming at desktop and mouse, have you thought of user resizable dropdowns? Image from Google: You could even remember the last size, and let users decide the best number. Otherwise, there's no good answer to your question: it depends on the real estate of your users and how important (or distracting if there's too much) is the item ...


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A List Box is in itself there to save space from a page, and to make it somewhat simple to select an item from a long list. I have found no recommendation on how many items to show at once. The only recommendation found is to not use a List Box when there are only two items (male/female) selection. The popular list box example is the country selector, where ...


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If I understand your problem, you're getting two single-click events followed by a double-click event and your UX is flickering as a result. In the Windows File Explorer, double-click works by amplifying a single click: A single click selects the file Double click then opens the selected file Can you follow a similar approach with your UX? Perhaps you ...


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To answer your question, no, don't re-implement the wheel. Operating systems already distinguish between single and double clicks very, very well. (They've been at it for years.) You might want to look into your programming language and determine if there are different event handlers available for single-click and double-click. For example, in .NET (for ...


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Could you do the following? When user selects the song, checkbox shouldn't be auto ticked Checkbox should only be ticked when user clicks on the checkbox itself Double clicking directly plays the song Note: this way, checkboxes could be reserved for editing/deleting/adding to playlist functions..


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It shouldn't focus on any item. The reason behind it, you wouldn't know which item he/she is going to tick next. Since to-do lists are not always ticked in consecutive order. Let the user choose which item to focus next himself/herself. Because auto focusing on the next or previous task might also lead to accidental ticks..


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There's no research that I can see from my own quick Googling. The above answers are quite subjective also. If we are talking subjectively, I agree with @BDD - jumping to the next item is preferable considering it's user ordered. But let's be objective. I would recommend: Look at your competitors. I've screen shotted "Reminders" from iOS for you. They ...


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With a list from top to bottom, I prefer "next one". Because when you're working with task 2, in most case, you already done with task 1. Should you comeback to task 1 then do one more step to work with task 3? People always look ahead, when need to look behind, we turn our head back.


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I think either would be acceptable, but I would conduct user testing to see what your users think. In general though while I'm developing lists, I like to it jump to the next task, so it would go with this example and have all the tasks shift upward. So it would be something like this example. Task 1 item 2 is deleted Task 1 Task 2 ** ...


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To me it would be better to get rid of the check box and just highlight the selected item. If they need to select multiple items they can use the ctrl+click approach. This should allow you to do what you want.


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It depends on the context. For example, the most common use for dates in an email program is viewing the most recent messages. In this context, sorting undated messages as newer than everything else would clog up the view, so undated messages get sorted as if they were infinitely old. On the other hand, if lack of a date represents an incompletely-entered ...


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Logical ordering by date would put the empty date entries first. Is it possible to make the date a required field? Depending on the nature of the application that may be the best approach.


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We face that ALL the time at work (sales orders, etc...). The newest items default to the top and the dateless items are placed at the bottom (under the oldest date). To find them the user has to select ascending order to place them at the top. Users don't have the slightest problem with them.


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In OS X Finder "No Date" items are shown last (after the oldest), there is no sorting by ascending order there, but I personally would still keep it at the bottom of the list in ascending order, too.



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