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0

I may be late to this, but my first thought is a hybrid of the two. Cubing it could make things easier to scan - the eyes don't have to move as much.


0

I think given the description, you are probably better off adding some filtering/sort function to the header row of the table and using them to return a result set. This probably gives you the most flexibility and you can customize the behaviour to more specific use cases. So for example, if you were trying to search for a name (it can be first or last name ...


0

First of all need more information about where this list be implemented. If it be any PC browser then good to use autocomplete functionality like in prev answer by sahith. But on Tablet and Mobile I don't recommend you use this feature because keyboard can use half of screen and connection can be slow and result list be not visible or show with delay. ...


0

An alternative could be to use the search with filter functionality. That way you wouldn't have to display error messages and the user would be able to clearly distinguish scenarios where there is a match and scenarios without a match. The user also avoids scrolling to find the matched result using this method. When results matching search are filtered and ...


1

You may try this You can change the sequence/order of your section contextually. i.e If your purpose is to send invites, Bring invite section to top.


1

Here is a live demo to demonstrate how easy this is to use. Keeping it simple and user-friendly is probably a good idea, so I would use something like this: It has concise yet easy-to-understand instructions at the top, and it's fairly obvious what you have to do. Here is what it looks like when interacting with it: You can also deselect items by ...


0

I would keep it simple: Two drop down lists. Having 20 items in a list is a good reason for using a drop down anyway. The lists could disable already selected items if it doesn't make sense to compare items with themselves.


4

I would do something like the following. Simply allow the user to pick an Item from the list and then click the arrow to which box you want it to go in (if something is already there, it will be replaced). Also, putting the list in the middle and the details on either side give it a much cleaner and simpler layout in my opinion. I've done this in many ...


8

Diff tools are usually aligned vertically: item 1 on the left, item 2 on the right. What is a "compare"? As for me, it is something like "select first item" then comare it with others. Once new item is better, I switch to it and another iteration begins. I will probably be iterested to mark some items i like and compare only these items. When screen is ...


22

two rows of radio buttons as e.g. on the wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Wikipedia&action=history


18

You give the entire list on the left side. Once the first item is selected show the selected item in right top window. Once the second item is selected show you can show the comparison between the two. Edited Components List (Collection of Nodes) Box A (For Node A) Box B (For Node B) On Mouse Over on any node show the option to select A or B (No ...


2

How about something like this? I think it can work pretty well for both desktop and mobile and it also uses less screen space. This also scales nicely to more than two options. No items selected. Next to your list of options there is a list of "tokens" that serve as a visual indicator of how many options you have to select. Only one item selected. When ...


3

I would combine the two existing answers here. They are both very good; but the drag and drop list: The concept of two distinct items is lost as the items are just added to an amorphous group of 2. Changing the selection requires explicitly removing an existing item. It would be a challenge to eliminate this step (e.g. you could drop onto an existing ...


21

You could use a source area (list of items) and a target area (drop zone), to which the user can drag items from the list. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups The drop zone should clearly state how many items are need to be placed there. I suggest to use a text message that emphasizes the remaining count of items, ...


7

If you want a two item selection for diffing, I think you can look to WinMerge as a good inspiration: If you are inside the app and click the "Open" icon it will launch a dialog with two textboxes for entering left and right files: WinMerge also integrates itself with Windows Explorer and puts a "WinMerge" entry in the Right mouse button context popup ...


3

You can see the solution on Gmail when you turn on vertical split view. When you click to some label and all you see all mails with this mail. Then you click on the top of mail body on cross near label name. Message on the left dissapeared but preview is still show, because any other mail was selected. Let's back to your application. I can see some clues ...


2

Option 2 will be best option Move the filters on top of the list. Show results below it. Keep the preview below the list. Hide the preview when, currently selected item is no longer in the list due to applied filter. Case Study : Lets consider root folder as books, and book1, book2, etc. are results, and the filter is price. User select book1, to get the ...


1

We implemented a dropdown / input field combobox for a similar thing. That way, you offer your users both kinds of interaction: Click the element to see the list of all options, scroll down and select one, drop-down style. This is useful when you'd like the see the complete list of options to help you decide. Start typing to manually input an item, with ...


0

I can add when I was studying The Not So Short Introduction to LATEX 2ε there was a quotation: A typographical rule of thumb for the line length is: On average, no line should be longer than 66 characters. This is why LATEX pages have such large borders by default and also why multicol- umn print is used in newspapers. It ...


1

If the number of items will be small enough to be seen at a glance, a horizontal comma-separated list may be best. Otherwise, if the number of items will be small enough to fit in a column and every item is short enough to fit in a line, a single-column list is also good. If there may be too many items to fit in one column, and the lengths will be similar ...


-2

The brain processes horizontal displays of information faster than vertical displays. Vertical scanning is associated in the brain with positional computing, i.e. where you are in relation to your surrounding. However, the brain stores information as lists, so it highly prefers information presented as lists, majority of which are vertical. Basically: for ...


1

I don't think it matters as much as having a predictable order so you can scan the list rapidly. I'd expect the column to make a difference for younger readers - and speed readers to have trained their brain to tackle both efficiently. Column looks easier for short lists. Ideally, for very long lists I'd love a table display where you keep the small tooltip ...


12

From the article Ultimate list of online content readability tests this example is blockquoted. Readability depends on lots of things… how you write how your reader reads (slowly or quickly) where your reader reads (a quiet library or a noisy cafeteria) what your reader is reading (a paperback book or an e-Reader) what experience your ...


9

Yes. Users don't read, they scan. If you are looking for a particular name, a list organised alphabetically is much easier to scan than putting them all inline in alphabetical order. User can scan the list based on the first letter, without reading the entire name.


1

I suggest, that Product Owner has "good" intentions of making the selection obvious and easy-to-perceived by users. Indeed, the pattern of dividing all the set of elements into un-selected and selected is convenient if there are a lot of elements. You can see an example: Moving the selected checkboxes is an attempt to implement this pattern, though it's ...


1

Alternatively, you can animate the item to move to the top - animation always conveys more information. But it's true, as it's been stated above, that it would be confusing if there are so many items that it would "disappear".


1

This is a classic case of a user trying to design a solution themselves, rather than just stating what problem they are trying to solve. Ask the user what they want to achieve with this interaction. Once you have this information you are in a better place to discuss alternate solutions. (Asking questions is a good strategy to get someone to be open ...


0

Option boxes are the wrong answer in this case as they aren't suited for this use case. Use option boxes to select one exclusive option. You might want to rearrange the items. This could be either done by drag and drop or some sorting functions. Drag and drop makes it hard for the user to spot if the functionality's there and also on mobile devices. You ...


3

The drag and drop and "older version" of it - using arrows: Drag and drop needs to have well solved interactions (how it behaves and looks like when dragging, how it looks like when you can and can't drop it). This is good thing to do, but only in case if you have a solid library to implement it (true on web, rarely true for desktop app frameworks). ...


2

There are a variety of issues I see with that suggestion, most notably: Breaks Conventions: Checkboxes are a very familiar element on web-pages and that suggestions is considerably different than the very familiar and widespread convention of the list staying static and only the checkbox changing (e.g. toggled as checked/unchecked), and as Jakob Nielsen's ...


2

The order is more important that leading with the default. You should present the choices in the order the user expects. If a list is in the right order, the user will be able to mentally chunk it and rely on their past experiences to basically not read the entire list. If the highlighted button is near the middle or the top or the bottom they can make an ...


1

Perhaps your Quickstart flow becomes something of a wizard, a series of simple, predefined steps that the user complete before they gain full access (or perhaps there are better, more positive ways to incentivize them, I'd need to know more about your context of use). Make it simple, quick, and as casual or "fun" as is appropriate to you audience... don't ...



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