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4

Add text for clarity and images for quick recognition UX is more about solving problems and making things easier for people and not about pretty icons. Images should enhance an already functional UI. Although this may be way off base from what your application is trying to do this would be more intuitive to first time users...


1

If you're talking about the hamburger icon and the "me", the way to break the table appearance of your screen is to swap everything around: Put the magenta camera icon on the left and the "Me" to the left of the hamburger (menu) icon which would be on the far right. Edit after feedback about my misunderstanding of the question You are asking what will make ...


3

You could Consider a more graphical approach as this will help you move away from tabular data and allow you to add more details if you wish to do so. This has also the advantage of providing an immediately understandable and comparable view of time units used. opting for a progress bar as in the mockup below, users will be able to get the information they ...


0

Suggestion: Name Time (hh:mm:ss) Test 1 0:45 Test 2 1:23:45 Avoid repeating the unit for each value - especially if this is a long list. The cost for casual observers (scroll up and match the unit pattern with the text) is IMO marginal compared to the reduced visual ...


2

I detest the iTunes UX, so I'm a fan of any competition :-) The 'conventional' way to sort is by clicking on the column headers. So I think any solution should attempt to be compatible with this behavior. For multi-column sort, things become more difficult. Columns can quickly get cluttered with tiny arrows or badges. The tiny directional arrows can be ...


0

Number all the items I have used numbers to customize the order of an otherwise alphabetized list which works well because it is still clear later on or even to newcomers. This also uses a minimal number of characters and can be used in combination with letters to create groups like so 1A dog, 1B cat, ... 5A jello, 5B cake, etc. The down side being that ...


0

Ω (Alt 234) will push an item to the bottom in windows file folders; I like it because it's intuitive.


0

"As always it is always best to let the user decide" I'm not totaly agree with that. It's the best way to make the user feeling indecisive. Sometime the best way to help a customer to use something is to offer him only one option (memory retention). Bloc by bloc (meaning moving the all number of items diplayed on the visible list at a time) is easier to ...


0

As always it is always best to let the user decide, and offer them the option, as when scrolling on a PC, to choose a line scroll (analogous to using the cursor keys) or a page scroll (analogous to PgUp and PgDn). Each method has its merits: Line-by-Line gives the user a less sudden flash to a new environment, and it easier on the eyes. Page-by-Page ...


1

The most user friendly list at the bottom of a blog post, at least for me, is to have no list at all, but a single link titled 'Read this next'. This might need human curation rather than just tag matching, but it means a lot to me. I can only click one article's title at a time, and someone has already done the hard work and chosen that for me? I am sold.


0

I like DaveAlger's suggestion. Here are two other layout options that might work for you. I think it depends on what kind of content you have.


2

Use each link as an item separator Separate the links from the descriptions and place them in a vertical list. With proper spacing it should be clear where each item begins and ends without the need for bullet point dots.


0

Displaying just 1 will make the other lose a good part of its meaning. For example, unless the review is very detailed, **what would be your impression of a product with 1 start (or 5) if t has just 1 review vs one that has 500 reviews?* It's a very different situation! If you don't display the numbers of reviews too, you could be creating a possible false ...


1

Some ideas: If you sort by date, can't you make "Location Group" visible as an attribute in the same way Item Name, Item Details, and Date are listed? That way the distinction is still present. Its hard to say one way or the other without more context. I'm also not sure what flexibility you have yet at the wire frame stage, but you could also color code ...


5

It's not a lot of information. Amazon already do something similar. It's quite informative.


1

Assumption: The system has a large number of files and large number of different file types. 1. Grouping things into categories and subcategories simplifies things Imagine trying to understand all living organisms without any form of classification. No kingdoms, phylums, classes, orders, families, etc. This one simple example clearly illustrates the ...


1

The visual 'files and folders thing' goes back to the original Apple Mac 'Classic' interface in 1984 ( which in itself was influenced by the Xerox Star interface). Users didn't really have to think about hierarchies so much as putting files inside files inside files. Before that if you used a computer what you got was the command line interface of DOS. ...


1

Issues for both novice and expert users: I would say that nested hierarchies of folders have fundamental issues for both expert and novice users, but we have kind of squared with it and learned to manage it as good as we can. There are at least two problem areas that I can think of: 1- Finding existing documents: To find a file or a document you ...


0

I'm wondering whether there's any evidence that nested hierarchies of folders make sense to novice users. What is your definition of a novice user AND why aren't you testing to see what confuses them? My 10 yr old is a novice user but she understands nested folders (as well as the + and - labels). Anyone with an iPod or iTunes understands nested ...



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