New answers tagged

0

My guesses are that on the main screen your users will need to have recent chats. Let's say that personal chats are more important than conversations with companies. It means that we need to make a focus on personal chats and put it on the main screen. For contact book, I propose to separate screen with all existing contacts into two sections People and ...


1

Perhaps you should break down your features into separate pages. You should focus on doing one task per page since mobile device has limited screen estate. Doing one task only also has the benefit of simplifying the app and reduce the cognitive load on the user to learn your app. This is a very typical layout for a messaging app. The contact list should ...


0

Each of the bullet points you've listed above describe distinct user tasks and goals. You need to think about which tasks require which interface elements. Start by identifying which tasks will be carried out most; to prioritize a task ask the these questions: how often is the task done? How many users do this task? Based on your answers, you can prioritize ...


0

I think Apple is wrong in not including multiple selection. Switches just feel like they are for settings. I can't help but think of them as "on" and "off". I don't want to say I'm turning off tee work in my baseball practice. I want to say I'm not doing it today and deselect. Here I've drawn my own checkbox for comparison with the native recommendation ...


2

Maybe grouping your stats into logical groups can help break up the long list? Here's my thinking: In this way, the general category of the stat can be searched for, then the smaller detailed stats are not so difficult to find because you are searching from a smaller group.


0

If limited to a few items tiles are OK. However, over 10 tiles I find a list visually faster to scan for the item of interest - especially if some of the tiles look similar. I dislike Windows 10 tiles and wish there was an option for a compact list of all applications.


1

This question has 2 dimensions: one of them totally off topic (the implementation side) and the other being the UX side. Luckily, even the implementation side has been covered by Wojciech's answer. As for the UX part: technically, it can be done. But the question is: why would you want to do this? See, the idea of searching is to display results based on ...


0

I would look into something like: Possibly color-coded and playing with blank spaces.


2

Not actually an UX question... Your devs are half-wrong, since sorting & pagination might be actually performed by DB. When using LINQ, for example the following expression: var persons = (from p in container.Persons where p.Age >= 18 && p.Sex == Sex.Female orderby p.Distance ascending select p) ...


0

I am going to have to say that the list view is better in this circumstance given that the scanabitily is preference with finding these customers. I think a more comprehensive answer can be given with more context as to the purpose of displaying the customers and for what function. You don't like the list view because it wastes space. Does this mean you ...


4

What about this idea which I attached below? In this you can display the image title below the image as shown here and on mouse hover event you can show the description on light background on the image. One more thing just add paging below the list and fix your screen so only listing portion will get update.


2

I would recommend a single selection grid. This link has an example (choose "row selection"). If your list is very long, you may also add a search box.


0

This depends on your intention. If you want your users to be able to easily compare the plans stick to a single unit of measurement. If you want to make them more hard to compare, choose your units to make the biggest numbers for the plans you want to emphasise. This is actually a practice you may see in European supermarkets, they are required to put a ...


0

If you are not targeting touch devices, you could think about showing a grid with just pics and name, at the mouseover the pic enlarges, or pop-up, showing the surname and other informations too. This save a lot of space and become something more interactive (and fun, why not)


1

Personally, I don't think you need to highlight plans by their speed as the table is rather easy to follow. But I do have the following comments: Do you really have plans with speeds ranging from KB/s to GB/s? If not, I would really try to settle on a consistent unit of measurement across all of them. If possible, I would make the table sortable by the ...



Top 50 recent answers are included