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I assume you should be able to select single students as well. I would seperate the group selection from the student selection something like this: So the top box is like a filter for the students list and in the list students can be selected individually. Hope this helps. :)


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One solution would be to separate the groups selection task from the list of students. 1) Show a "Select group(s)" button at the top/bottom of your list. 2) When clicked, open a modal with a scrollable list of groups. 3) Once confirmed, the list of students show which one got selected and it's still editable by hand. Leave the "All students" at the top of ...


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Since you want to do it in the mobile app, it is better not to use the shopping cart style. I attached a pic in the following. This is very easy to use and clear in the design, especially for mobile app. Pulling down to create an item and when you click on the item, it allows you to edit. Hope it helps.


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One way i would represent this is to use a waterfall pattern. In a waterfall methodology, current step flows into the next step and so on. So, if you could display the stacks indented (like reply to comments in a blogpost) it would instruct the user that the preceding rule is executed first and its output is fed to the next rule. Hope this helps. Another ...


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Do people (in different countries) use different list-style-type for numbering list element? (e.g. shopping list, to-do list, list of students in school, ...) Yes in some countries using different alphabets to Latin If so, does Greek use greek, Japanese use katakana, Armenians armenian, ... all the time (in every situation) or maybe in a few cases ? ...


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This is to ensure localization is supported and when a website translation is done, the list styles also reflect localization. For example,here is a screenshot of the number options in different languages which are supported by CSS and required by the W3 for localization For example if you were localizing for Ethiopia, You would be required to use ...


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The better way to show related items is grouping them. Not sure if possible, but the easiest way for the user to associate a relationship between elements is grouping them by categories or similar subjects. Think on a typical footer, or a good organized submenu. If not possible I would try to use bold fonts or an icon in related items in order to show a ...


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Have you considered using Sprint management tools for user stories as best in practice examples? http://www.jetbrains.com/youtrack/ and https://sprint.ly/ work these kind of tasks quite well


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If you can fit the information, I think a table would be much better because 1. it makes visually scanning the list easier. When the user has to jump over elments, borders, white space etc. to see the short description, it takes more effort and time. 2. You can fit more records in one page so the user needs to scroll less. 3. You can use inline filters - ...


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Although it assumes some understanding form the user (and maybe that's through training/documentation), you could use a key graphic, shaded and unshaded:


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Two checkboxes in a single row is confusing. Selecting a set of fields and then setting the property of each field is a 2 step process. This is not very clear in the UI. May be you can try to set the unique identifier in the next step after the associated fields have been selected. However to remove the confusion of 2 check box controls the only ...


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Kudos on getting a sound user research done and framing the question well. The problem here is that Apple assumes that the users know of the affordances. Ideally though, there should be signifiers denoting the said affordance. You've given some thought to this already and have come up with reasonable solutions, so I'm merely expanding on your solutions ...


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Rather than mixing many icons into the table it may be easier to use them as the header label (with a tool-tip on hover), and a simple check mark to indicate that a user has this role. I think that this approach allows for uniform column width and will make the table far more scannable.


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If your users will visit the list frequently and the roles will be maximum 10, then I recommend that you use icons and mouse over tooltips for their descriptions. Icons are much more superior than words for a quick visual scan. After a few interactions your users will learn the icons and their meaning. Otherwise if the users will not visit the list ...


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If the list is so big, i think that multiple columns with icons is not functional. I prefer to add their roles with checkbox choice.


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Simplifying your data when in a table is crucial to readability. When I make a front-end table, I use the same principles as if I would be doing a SQL table to some extent. If it were a database, you'd have a new item per role. instead of one enumerator that returned, or a csv. So in your table I would do that. What I think has happened to you here is you ...


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In principal the use of icons (on their own) to convey complex concepts is a very difficult enterprise because they are prone to multiple interpretations, so would strongly suggest identfying larger groups of roles rather than specific roles. However, if you intend to use icons, you need to include labels to make sure that the right meaning is conveyed. ...


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You say "could have up to 10"... But how many do most folks have? If most have 1 or 2 roles, you could show up to 2 icons plus a " more" link for those who need it. Another thought is maybe users could identify their primary role, then just display that icon with a link to "more" when needed. This way too, you are showing only the highest value info ...


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You are right to be worried about the number of icons becoming too large. Unless you can find icons that are really obvious, this will become overwhelming for the user. You could try splitting the roles up into a small number of categories, and assigning an icon to each category. For example, you could have a "management" category represented by an icon in ...


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The best option here depends on what your user needs to do. 1. If it's important to be able to quickly skim the list to find a Founder, it makes sense to put Founder in its own column like your second example. You can glance down any of the member type columns and quickly find the ones you're looking for. 2. If it's important to quickly learn about an ...


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The problem with using icons is that you are requiring the user to have an additional cognitive load of trying to remember which icons relates to which user group and as the user scans down the table, he will no longer have the header as the textual indicator of what each icon stands for. Instead of going with icons, I would recommend going with a ...


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I have had the same challenge in quite a few designs in recent years. If the interface involves drag-and-drop (for reordering), I personally have found that the most usable way of adding an item was also by using drag-and-drop. This was largely after testing a multitude of solutions, including a (design-award-winner-type) mobile application called Sooner. ...


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I'd suggest a context menu would give the best experience. In all likelihood other functions will emerge over time that pertain to an item in the list. (To complement your "Insert below", "Insert above" springs to mind straight away—not to mention "Delete".) Enabling the user to invoke such functions by right-clicking an item would allow you to avoid ...



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