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1

I would suggest keeping your current UI with one change: If you keep the pagination, put the comment field only at the end... ...OR kill the pagination, and put the comment field at the end. Either way I would make the ticket's comment conversation a prerequisite to entering into the conversation. It's important the user understands the conversation ...


0

Don't load all the data upfront like this. Send your filter to the server to request results, but don't load them all at once. I would present the top 20 or so (depending on how much screen space you want to devote to this) results from the set in the drug list, essentially around double what will be visible to the user without scrolling. Then write some ...


1

I can't imagine any scenario where a user would benefit from scrolling manually through a list of 8000 items. As such, I don't think a list is the best default UI element to use here. I think you're halfway there with the search field. I'd show that as the default view: [ (type term to search) ] Then, upon a minimum threshold (say 3 ...


0

The users will likely need the information in differing orders depending on their current task. Your best option is to provide them with many different sort options that are clear and easy to select from. Also consider resetting to a common default after their session times out - returning to an awkward customized layout after a prolonged absence is often ...


0

I would try this exercise. Take two of your items, and ask yourself which one is newer or more recent. Better yet, ask users! Which attribute was most important in making that decision: creation time or update time? Your example makes it sound like you are hoping to provide the user with easy access to most recently used files. In that case I would propose ...


2

Taking as given that this is a necessary design element, then.... This classic "font-da mover" widget (as it was first seen by many of us), aka the list-to-list, has not radically changed in a while. Making it more contemporary, arguably "better," can be done by Drag-and-drop from list to list, instead of button actions. This will have to be rock-solid ...


2

If you want sex just say it. Stop leaving dirty magazines on my pillow. No doubt, a title needs explaining: to label each one w/ their respective code Good idea - clear and not ambiguous. place an icon next to each code representing a code type (then the user somehow has to know what the icons mean) Icons are troubles as they are rarely clear ...


1

Targeting specifically to your "page full of text boxes", it is (as you have mentioned) very important that you avoid such a situation. Might I suggest another approach where there is just one text box that will be used to add the nodes, and the subsequent nodes are added as text links below it. You may observe the remove icon next to every node, which will ...


0

I've decided that my approach shall rely on two changes to the above scheme. First, the Add Row button will be moved inline with the text boxes. When there's only one text box, there will be only the Add Row button. When there's more than one, then the Delete buttons will be displayed. Observe: This tells the user that can always add another row, and ...


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If this is a high volume page it's worth investigating with analytic tools to find out for sure. Ideally you could investigate your users using web analytics to determine the best answer for your user base expectations. clicky.com, for example, allows you to time each duration between the click on the form element above the item group and the form element ...


1

Based on the answer from @tim-huynh and the smart comment from @monkeyzeus, here's my two cents. Design 1 is ambiguous: user can think the icon means "add this group to something" before triggering the tooltip. Design 2 is better but still, I agree that a non-educated user won't be able to guess that the "new group" option will be to the right-behind her ...


0

Place icons in your topbar which have the color scheme and icon of the error. Perhaps in the top right, you could have them color coded. Have a floating number over the colored icon to indicate how many are present (do not show ones with 0). Clicking or touching the icon will reveal the errors in a popout or perhaps an accordian or whatnot, that design ...


0

I would like to add that The third option will depend on the size of the list. If the dropdown is very long, you might want to consider a predictive search, and then use that term to "Add New Group" if it's not found. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


10

The first design is the worst in terms of usability because the icon is ambiguous, and there's a real possibility that the user won't even see it. The user is going to be focused on (ie, reading) the dropdown menu and s/he can't process the icon at the same time; it's physically impossible. You're counting on the user to either find the icon by chance or by ...


2

I would go with the 2nd option because it clearly states the action and there is little or no ambiguity. Either you select one of existing groups from the dropdown or create your own. User experience cannot get simpler than that! 1st option could also work, but requires some action on users behalf. I assume the tooltip is shown only with a mouse hover and, ...


3

I would recommend going with the first option as it a clear visual indicator that users can add a new item to the list if not found. Here is an example of how you might do it The challenge with the third option is that you are expecting the user to scroll to the bottom of the list before he finds the option to add a new item. If the items in your list are ...


5

I think the first and third options are both possibilities, depending on how it will be used. If the user will need to add items quite frequently, the + button is definitely preferable out of those two, because it will be annoying to go through the list every time to get to "add new". If it might be a very long list of items, this will also increase the ...


4

If the user can add new groups, they question is if a combo box is the right component to solve this problem. An option would be to use an editable combo box. This means you can enter new groups directly within the text field: But be cautious, there a some drawbacks using this type of component. It is very easy to create new groups (might not be ...



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