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I find the search box more intuitive for search. However, the text boxes provide a way of advanced filtering. So, the question is - do you want your users to search or filter? If you want both, you may consider the following intermediate solution, Amazon is using the same. Your search box searching all columns by default but the user has the option to ...


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Actually your 1st option is a Filter, while 2nd one is rather a Search. They are just different tools. And both tools are useful. But dealing with large and complex datasets, I'm for 1st option. Per field filters provide more clear mental model. Table explicitly presents the data in highly structured view, which affects user's mental model. They think on ...


0

Grids are useful. Here are some tips which I hope are helpful. Grids don't have to look like grids. For example, the border width may be 0, or the border colour may be the same as the background or the fill colour. One drawback of this is that if the content is highly inconsistent in length, users may not perceive a pattern, and may instead see a ...


2

For me the only reason to avoid the single search (2nd option) would be to have several columns with similar content, thus leading to an inefficient search. If that's not the case I would totally go with the single search: There's only 1 entry point for search, thus less cognitive load. The users only have to think what to search, not where to search ...


3

Neither seem consistent The first big difference I see appears when the user have a list of maybe 15 items and they enter the page to add another one, I don't think it's a good idea to make them scroll to reach the New Item button. In the other hand placing the New Item button in the top isn't very familiar, plus the input point would descend 1 place to ...


1

The answer to the question is based on the fact that whats more important to your users, for them their old items in the wishlist might mean more to them and they would want them at the top (and add the new ones to the end of the list). The another approach, which I can say is more preferable in case of wishlist is, the newer the entry the more it is ...


0

If possible I'd avoid surfacing time stamps in the UI. It would be easier to understand if every time-looking text ("00:00") represented a duration. If this isn't possible I'd explicit label all time displays: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups and have them all fixed in place. The time outputs that aren't in use ...


1

Your current design looks solid. I think the placement of the set duration works, but if you're incorporating a time stamp as well, you will need to differentiate them to avoid confusion. Maybe something like so: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Disclaimer: I was limited in icon selection by the mockup software. ...


1

I'm assuming this are items for sale, so, what does it mean a lot? You want to make a sale, and you should not save efforts in doing so. Plus, any info that helps you close the sale is always useful. Plus, based in your description, I think you don't have a lot of info, but you have some "noise". First of all: assuming these are items for sale as mentioned ...


0

I recommend 2 things: Keep the edit and delete buttons aligned - this will minimize mouse travel, saving the user time and effort. Keep them in the same location, don't just add them to the end of the longest string. This will help maintain the users spatial memory so they'll always come to expect them in same location and not have to think about which is ...


-1

Look at the gestalt laws on wikipedia. Inclosure is the thing to go for! (EDIT) Using the "Laws" of gestalt, especially inclosure, which states that things in an enclosure belongs together. This principle applies to the number of boxes shown on the screen in question. The screen affords scrolling, but inclose the boxes you show on screen within a rectangle ...


5

Visual cues can suggest there aren't more elements and that the complete "page" is visible and can't be scrolled. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups The inner rectangle groups the 6 items, suggesting a singular group, a panel that fills the viewport. The space above the top item and below bottom item show that there ...


5

Most of the people scroll-down because of a huge amount of websites and apps that are using it more and more. I would use some typography and i would add on some distance from the bottom. Maybe something like a footer. but i still think the average user is used to scroll "by default"


0

For a simple solution to try: use a half-width, centered HR tag (or mobile equivalent) at the bottom and see whether your users continue to scroll up and down.


0

For what I get from your mockups, I think your problem is the lists are not connected, but the elements inside those lists may (or may NOT) connect to another element, thus lists are hard to connect. If you take a closer look, you're trying to connect elements from left list to resources that may fit into the following statuses: true the activity contains ...


1

Why do you present an extra list with the ressources, where only a few of them will be enabled/ highlighted and most are disabled? This doesnt make sense. I would recommend to skip the ressources extra list and just put the dedicated ressources at the end of every article. Thus the connection is clear, it is in focus and chances are high users will click on ...


7

You are right, it's a natural thing to scroll down when you see a list with an arbitrary number of items. If 6 is not arbitrary, then make sure your users are not expecting more or less. On the other hand, there is no harm in scrolling up or down, the user quickly discovers that the entire list is on the screen and gets used to it. You can help that by ...


0

I would form clickable / tapable groups of the characteristics. On tapping the area expands and shows the details. And a second tap could retract the details again. This way you can compactly and logically display a lot of information. You should not enforce landscape because many people like to hold their phone or tablet in portrait. Leave the choise to ...


1

If the element is clickable, make it noticeable and get rid of any uncertainty about the affordance of the given element. In order to achieve this, you can try different options: use a floating button action as trigger: this is the Google Material approach, so it's meant for Android, and it visually helps the user to clearly understand what is a header ...


0

Always start by asking what users need to do with the data Do they need to go into a specific record to look up info or make edits or bulk edits? Put in easy search & filtering. Determine what are the general context users start with when it comes to finding data. Do they do a specific search (e.g. name, email, phone #) or by ranges? (e.g. by city, ...


0

Basic requirements I'd second everything scunliffe said. Sort and filter are critical. Pagination is once you get past 100 or 1000, depending on the data and speed of your service. You mentioned supporting search and query-building, but it deserves repeating that simple search is a given. On the point of pagination, it might help to think of it in database ...


2

Managing a list of anything... that is over ~50 items is tricky unless you have (or in this case provide) the right tools. Paginate the results - seeing more than ~100 of something on a screen is not very usable (If the user needs to see a larger set/all at once, provide an export option where they can manipulate the data externally) Sorting - provide ...


4

If the user has that large number of entries, I think is a better idea to sit the final user and get the requirements of the task that he is actually trying to do. I don't have all the context but what is he trying to achieve: If the user has to review all entries one by one (for example an accountant needs to review all the balances to see what is not ...


0

On the above screens, the button is not prominent on the touch screen. Consider making the Buy or Add to Cart button and any other calls to action prominent as well as making the shopping cart visible and accessible wherever users are on a mobile try to create new section below the product and put both button. It should be easy for your users to checkout ...


1

Your question is logical. As per my opinion you have already solved this problem (I mean, you already have the better solution). The reason is if any user is a frequent purchaser then from the complete list he will just add it to cart. So placing add to cart on the list of perfumes is perfectly fine. If I am a new user, I would prefer reading some ...



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