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15

I believe the cause is that handwriting generally has a higher x-height than printed type. That makes all-caps handwriting look more like printed small-caps, which are generally not considered rude, and actually end up looking formal. It's also true that all-caps used on the web now carries the connotation of screaming by convention (as mentioned by Juan ...


10

All capital handwriting is easier to read because it takes more time to write and forces the author to slow down. This increases legibility by requiring the writer to compose each individual letter one at a time. The variations for capital letters are less compared to lower case or cursive characters. Architects and engineers developed their particular ...


9

Caps are more difficult to read. This is because all letters have the same height, requiring some additional scrutiny to recognize each word (we read word by word, not letter by letter). So you can use caps to EMPHASIZE a short heading, but if you use it all along the text your readers might quit reading early because of the additional effort, i.e., slower ...


9

Partly to do with the likely matching lower case of the word when found embedded in the relevant content. Partly to provide a consistent nature to the tags without seeming to give any one tag preferential treatment or any sense of importance that is not due. Partly to remove a layer of complication when creating, defining, exposing, using, sharing, ...


5

I would not remove the capital letters. Proper casing of text should not be considered to be a distraction, and capital letters help with the comprehension of text. I feel the absence of expected capitals would amount to more of a distraction as users pause to wonder where the capital letters went. A comprehension example: Is your name "de slonde", "desl ...


3

This is fuzzy stuff and I'm not aware of definitive data. Nonetheless, I'll speak to what I've found in my work. Mixed case can aid in visual scanning. Where there are known terms in use for actions (Submit, Cancel, Apply, etc) the caps can serve a cognitive purpose: Help the user jump to the first letter of a key action and delineate multiple words in an ...


3

Is "all lower-case" a rule? If you google "tag cloud images", you'll find all kinds of tags. Example from Wikipedia: The advantage I see for a pure lowercase situations, is that the tags could be used in a context where lowercase makes sense. Eg This post is marked with tag, tagging, lowercase and question as opposed to This post is marked ...


3

Generally in plain text, bold text is use to EMPHASISE a word. When everything that you write is being emphasised, the closest equivalent to continual emphasis in speech is shouting. The exception to this is when it is being used for labels and signs.


3

Generally, it is more aesthetic to use "Proper case". But I believe there is way more variation of the form of small letters than caps for handwriting. This is why in case of handwriting, caps are less difficult to decipher, which degrades the meaning of proper case.


2

Well from my work experience I can say that yes the Designer was right. But it cannot be applied in every place. Small case do look good and can be easily read but if we are only dealing with words then it is not advised. So when we write a label we can use lower case as it gives good contours and help in understanding the work without going through each ...


2

There is some research on this question - sort of. See the third paper in this issue of Vision Research. In the first experiment, participants identified words and random strings of letters presented in either all upper case, all lower case, and mixed case letters. Words presented in all upper case were recognized at smaller sizes than words presented in ...


2

This can be a double-edge sword. If something (like the readability of text of different styles) has been tested to be beneficial in some cases, the fact that it is unconventional can incur a penalty. For instance using all lowercase letters might be read faster than other capitalization styles, the fact that it is unconventional for it to appear on a ...


2

It depends on the circumstances, but I look at lower case text as a "style" more than UX solution. Just as Gino has pointed out with your name, I found DesLonde easier to understand than deslonde. The caps provides a helpful indicator with the pronunciation. However, this doesn't mean you can't use lower case text in combination of upper case text to ...


1

Microsoft uses a checkbox for "Match case" throughout the Office Suite, and Visual Studio: A checkbox makes sense; it is an option to either do or not do. An On/Off switch works fine too; it has the same functionality as a checkbox. I would advice you to not use the combobox, as that hides the options, and you would have to click it only to find an extra ...


1

CAUTION: ALL CAPS SHOULD ONLY BE USED IN WARNING TEXT Title Case is For Titles, and Other Important Headings Sentence case is for narrative text, and you should always include a period after it. lower case only appropriate for bullet text dOn'T eVeN cOnSiDeR uSiNg MiXeD cAsE, eVeR These are just general guidelines, though - consult a real internet style ...


1

Caps aren't significantly easier to read than standardized, separated non-caps in handwriting, the 'printed letters' of 'block letters'. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Block_letters


1

Your recent edit (reverting my title change) helps me understand your needs. The question can be paraphrased "which of the following is sentence case", and the answer for the two examples is: Duplicate search Combine users Sentence case is, simply put, capitalising the first letter of a sentence and only proper nouns (like people's names and place ...


1

The correct capitalization scheme depends on the location of the label and the platform. Here are links to two guidelines for capitalization. Windows: Use title-style capitalization for titles, sentence-style capitalization for all other UI elements. Doing so is more appropriate for the Windows tone. Exception: For legacy applications, you may use ...


1

or is it the expected norm that *Nix system will always be case sensitive? For developers, yes. if your audience is such which has even the most basic of familiarity with Linux For (most) users, no. If the majority of your audience is not accustomed to "a" not being the same as "A" in a command or query, then resolving this limitation would make ...


1

ba da cha Nice. Ben, this is a great point. Tags with an upper-case first letter would be more readable, according to usability research. 50 Websites Deconstructed by Jacob Nielsen talks about this. Just because they're input in lower-case doesn't mean we can't display them with the best convention. Input!=Output. I say convert the tags to have upper-case ...



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