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5

Yes, you get to control the pace. It's a form of storytelling. Sometimes you don't want to roll everything out all at once. All of these pacing decisions need to be weighed against how much value those pauses in the action will deliver. Progressive disclosure: Maybe you can reduce or prevent errors by using progressive disclosure patterns. De-cluttering a ...


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It really depend on context. A general all audience public UI need to have both good learnability and usability. But a specific custom narrow audience business tool can aim for fast flow in operation rather than easy to learn IF and only IF operators get substantial and accurate training on the UI/application. There may be a cost issue in the way, where ...


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Interesting question and I'll be very interested to see what others have to say as well. With regards to video tutorials, an usablity study found that, most new users prefered watching the video tutorials as opposed to scanning the text.To quote the article Only a few of the users read the help. Most just watched the videos. Keep in mind that all of ...


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Having just discussed by our instructor in Systems Analysis and Design Chapter 8 (The link is just the table of contents), the UI should be transparent to the user. And by that, it meant: The UI should be intuitive (easy to learn) The UI should not get in the way of use (easy to use) The UI should be easy to learn and not have a very steep learning ...


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Multimedia learning theory Based on Mayer's multimedia learning theory, optimal understanding is achieved if the models built by our visual channel correspond to those build by our auditory channel, and the two match previous knowledge and understanding (or long-term memory models). The theory is somewhat an extension of Pavio's dual-coding theory. ...


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As a general rule, we can say that there is no reason to use a difficult interface if you can use a simple one, although there are situations where it is acceptable and even recommended, and if you have to do it, it's better that it is easy to learn but with all the required element than easy to use and lacking necessary elements. For instance, Microsoft ...


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Off the top of my head, things to Google pertaining to this industry that came out over the past 10 years the cloud (heh) mobile design responsive web design touch interactions AJAX JS libraries (jQuery, etc.) CSS libraries (Bootstrap, etc.) Apps (native vs. hybrid) HTML5 Agile Dev/Lean UX For UX work, in terms of hardware, get whatever you want. Any ...


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I started out as a web designer and made the transition to a user experience designer. I made the transition by thinking more and more about user experience with my designs versus what looks good right now. A pretty design may get you a lot of likes on Dribbble or Behance, but a smart workflow gains you the appreciation of your users. Read and learn ...


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I recommend that you just start reading every UX book you can get your hands on: http://www.jeremytunnell.com/posts/books-on-user-experience-and-user-interface-design And then spend a year or so offering your services, basically below-market rates, to do a UX analysis or new product feature. Look for nonprofits, government agencies, and places that don't ...


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Try out the methods at www.usability.gov, in any way you can. If you can't get "real" work experience on those methods, start up a project in your free time, most of these methods cost very little time and money to try out. Volunteer work is another great way if you're mostly concerned about the experience



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