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44

Short answer You can't design for them. It can be that your design is bad, or that people really cannot concentrate on the task due to their internal reasons, explained below in the long version. If you have successfully determined that it is the second case, nothing in your design can change how people tick internally. An easier to use application will ...


5

It really depend on context. A general all audience public UI need to have both good learnability and usability. But a specific custom narrow audience business tool can aim for fast flow in operation rather than easy to learn IF and only IF operators get substantial and accurate training on the UI/application. There may be a cost issue in the way, where ...


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Yes, you get to control the pace. It's a form of storytelling. Sometimes you don't want to roll everything out all at once. All of these pacing decisions need to be weighed against how much value those pauses in the action will deliver. Progressive disclosure: Maybe you can reduce or prevent errors by using progressive disclosure patterns. De-cluttering a ...


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Hectic, fast and instant. Everything has to be an instant success. People have a range of personalities and some people work like this. On one occasion I got someone behaving like this when testing a computer game and I decided to just junk the testing script and use the time to have a chat about why they felt this way about the game they were supposed ...


4

With so much going on, I think you need to narrow what are very broad fields and focus on certain topics within them. "Learning UX design" is not something that actually defines your goals very well. UX practitioners themselves will argue (to little effect) what UX design actually consists of (See image below). I suggest you find a topic from the image ...


2

As Marjan said in the comments, it could be possible that you just stumbled upon some really bad users :) Since we have no idea of how your design works and how good the architecture is, the only thing that comes to my mind is this kind of situation: -> The user start the action -> The user land on a page where he doesn't know what to do anymore -> Either ...


2

Having just discussed by our instructor in Systems Analysis and Design Chapter 8 (The link is just the table of contents), the UI should be transparent to the user. And by that, it meant: The UI should be intuitive (easy to learn) The UI should not get in the way of use (easy to use) The UI should be easy to learn and not have a very steep learning ...


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If participants are forgetting what you asked them to do during a usability test, that could indicate issues with the design that is being tested. However, it could also indicate ways in which you can improve your usability research methods. For example: Are these appropriate participants? It's ideal to ensure diversity, particularly if your product ...


1

As a general rule, we can say that there is no reason to use a difficult interface if you can use a simple one, although there are situations where it is acceptable and even recommended, and if you have to do it, it's better that it is easy to learn but with all the required element than easy to use and lacking necessary elements. For instance, Microsoft ...


1

Off the top of my head, things to Google pertaining to this industry that came out over the past 10 years the cloud (heh) mobile design responsive web design touch interactions AJAX JS libraries (jQuery, etc.) CSS libraries (Bootstrap, etc.) Apps (native vs. hybrid) HTML5 Agile Dev/Lean UX For UX work, in terms of hardware, get whatever you want. Any ...


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I started out as a web designer and made the transition to a user experience designer. I made the transition by thinking more and more about user experience with my designs versus what looks good right now. A pretty design may get you a lot of likes on Dribbble or Behance, but a smart workflow gains you the appreciation of your users. Read and learn ...


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I recommend that you just start reading every UX book you can get your hands on: http://www.jeremytunnell.com/posts/books-on-user-experience-and-user-interface-design And then spend a year or so offering your services, basically below-market rates, to do a UX analysis or new product feature. Look for nonprofits, government agencies, and places that don't ...


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Try out the methods at www.usability.gov, in any way you can. If you can't get "real" work experience on those methods, start up a project in your free time, most of these methods cost very little time and money to try out. Volunteer work is another great way if you're mostly concerned about the experience



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