Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

44

Short answer You can't design for them. It can be that your design is bad, or that people really cannot concentrate on the task due to their internal reasons, explained below in the long version. If you have successfully determined that it is the second case, nothing in your design can change how people tick internally. An easier to use application will ...


35

Start working on your 10,000 hours any way you can. That means reading up on material concerning the field, diving in and applying for a job, hacking away at something as a hobby, keeping up with industry developments, paying attention to the thought leaders (eg. Jakob Nielsen, Jared Spool, Steve Krug, etc) and asking lots of questions. So I'd expect to see ...


32

I hired a new UX person last year, right out of school. Some highlights of my inspirational (imho) UX talk with him: Always be observing and analyzing. Why is the ceiling this tall? Who is that? Why do they do it that way? When do they decide this? How do they figure it out? Which? What? Never, ever, ever nod your head and say you got it when you ...


25

You're here! This is the right place! You can answer real people's real questions about real situations and needing real answers, - maybe with just real ideas, or with real mock-ups and real designs! All manner of problems and challenges are raised here - take a look at previous questions (especially the unaccepted/unanswered ones) or watch the new ones ...


16

UX Magazine UX Booth UX Matters Usability Post Boxes and Arrows


9

I got my PhD in cognitive psychology, then researched and taught it (lecturer/assistant prof) for the last nine years before deciding to move into UX. You don't have to go my route ;o) but I'd say that it's a really useful subject in which to get a little experience, mainly for the following three reasons: Being able to explain to your UX team the science ...


8

Mostly agree with what Rahul said - but I'd like to especially emphasise one thing. Practice doing user experience work. Practice it a lot. Reading blogs, books, papers, and courses are all great. But knowing how to apply that knowledge is a different thing. The real learning comes when you try and apply your knowledge, make mistakes, and fix 'em. You ...


8

I agree with Rahul, some very good points there. Having a solid background as a developer helps me a lot during my work as a user experience designer (I used to develop websites, but quickly moved to UXD). You know the techniques (and their limitations) you work with. In my opinion this helps you design (technically) realistic products that are possible ...


8

Compared to horizontal top-of-page menus, vertical left-side navigation has been found to yield faster navigation and greater user satisfaction. This may be simply due to vertical navigation bars being so common that users are used to them, but it may also be due to it being easier to scan down a menu than across. Interestingly, it appears you can combine a ...


7

Introduction Read The Design of Everyday Things for usability Don't Make Me Think for empathy. Then read Sketching User Experiences for sketching, learn what a persona is (google it or read the entire book The Inmates Are Running the Asylumn), and Emotional Design for desirabity. Good solutions are usable, useful, and desirable. To start ...


5

It's because we're still building web sites like we were building Model Ts on an assembly line floor. Software/web development is not an assembly line process. Concepts such as waterfall and SixSigma need to be tossed out the window. Of course, most established companies of size simply can't do that. They are old dogs and refuse to learn any new tricks. ...


5

I work with a LOT of developers. They are highly intelligent and have a certain logical mindset that makes them very good at being developers. It's easy to believe that everyone thinks like you do, which I can assure you they do not. In addition to what the others have said, I would suggest that you spend time watching users. Get inside their heads to see ...


5

Not an easy situation, and there is a lot that you could cover. Therein lies the biggest problem. If you try cover everything that they should know, you're going to lose them in the volume. Decide what 3 concepts are the most important for them to get fully, and then stick to those three. Then let them experience the concepts rather than you just telling ...


5

Basic qualifications required from my own research : Have experience in user centered design approach. Have a degree in the field of HCI, Software engi, web/graphic or related design and a strong online portfolio. You having some focus on requirements can show your user research skill Liaising with product managers and other stakeholders to gain an ...


5

User testing. Even if an initial design is poor, its worst aspects can be ameliorated so long as the designer understands the value of usability testing. If they can write good tasks that don't lead the user, and understand the kinds of issues they should be looking for, they will be equipped to create a solid application. Maybe nothing amazing, but ...


5

Hectic, fast and instant. Everything has to be an instant success. People have a range of personalities and some people work like this. On one occasion I got someone behaving like this when testing a computer game and I decided to just junk the testing script and use the time to have a chat about why they felt this way about the game they were supposed ...


5

Yes, you get to control the pace. It's a form of storytelling. Sometimes you don't want to roll everything out all at once. All of these pacing decisions need to be weighed against how much value those pauses in the action will deliver. Progressive disclosure: Maybe you can reduce or prevent errors by using progressive disclosure patterns. De-cluttering a ...


5

It really depend on context. A general all audience public UI need to have both good learnability and usability. But a specific custom narrow audience business tool can aim for fast flow in operation rather than easy to learn IF and only IF operators get substantial and accurate training on the UI/application. There may be a cost issue in the way, where ...


4

Interestingly, I have had a related problem, that UX is seen as the area of the designers, who did do it reasonably well, whereas it should be across the board, and involve the developers too. We can make a difference to usability. There is no simple answer, but I think providing in some cases the evidence that doing things in x way has been shown to be ...


4

Hand Sketching Is King If you're trying to learn wireframing from scratch, start by hand sketching. The computer might be faster at some point, but the skills learned from sketching are irreplaceable. You don't have to be good at drawing (just use graph paper). Leah Buley teaches UX drawing for everyone through UX Weeks worldwide, and you can learn a lot ...


4

Underlying all the principles of design and UX tools and techniques is understanding users - the psychology of how people think and see - how they make decisions, what motivates them, what engages them, how memories are strengthened, how fallible we are and how mistakes are made. Beginners like to know how something matters to them, so introducing topics ...


4

Personally I really hate when a program updates and I can't get information about the update. You could insert a link to all improvements somewhere in about this program or something like that. It sound like a huge improvement, so you could make a small message appear, when the user opens the program for the first time since the update. Here you could tell ...


4

Design a dashboard of data. Allow users to drill down and edit the content. That sounds like a very specific task, but it's actually one that would expose students to many facets of UX: The visual display of quantitative information Discoverability of content and information scenting Relationships between views and drilldowns; when to use modal windows ...


4

With so much going on, I think you need to narrow what are very broad fields and focus on certain topics within them. "Learning UX design" is not something that actually defines your goals very well. UX practitioners themselves will argue (to little effect) what UX design actually consists of (See image below). I suggest you find a topic from the image ...


3

I'm currently taking a degree in 'Cognitive Systems' which includes ComputerProgramming/Informatics, Cognitive Psychology, Linguistics, and a bit of Philosophy. From the courses I've taken (mostly CompSci classes with a couple Psych and Ling), I've found the Linguistics courses to be just as relevant to UX design than the Psychology, if not more so. ...


3

Perhaps designing user interfaces for other user types (audience) might be interesting for you. Like for example children with Autism Spectrum Conditions. Not only would you have to rethink how to make an application easy to understand but also how to keep the user interested in what is going on on the screen (short attention span). Yet the design needs to ...


3

Well of course hanging around on UX Stack Exchange and actively participating in discussion is a great way to learn. Can I also recommend a free online course that is coming to the web this october. Alan Dix is co-author of one of the best Human Computer Interaction text books. In October he is going to be running a free online HCI course - Alan is an ...


3

"Don't Make Me Think" is a great place to start. For further reading I suggest you take a look at Must-read User Interface Book? I would also recommend you think beyond books and blogs, and find inspiration in everyday design to drive your motivation: Sources of UX inspiration



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible