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18

You could try to approach this with an, "tell them about better ways to do what they are doing when they do it" approach. For example, if I am selecting text and clicking bold, that is fine, but if I do that over and over maybe have a modeless (non disruptive, out of the way) notification that could say something like, "Did you know you can press ctrl-b to ...


12

If I were you, I would add tooltips like on Microsoft Excel 2010 and add help page with a list of shortcuts (something like this). I think that should be enough. Screenshot of russian Microsoft Excel, displaying tooltip when hovering over bold icon.


10

To facilitate the discovery of shortcuts you can provide information of some shortcuts when the CTRL key is pressed. In this way, when the user uses a basic shortcut (e.g., CTRL+C to copy) small tooltips can appear over the ribbon to indicate that more shortcuts are available. Another option to announce the availability of shortcuts is to indicate them in ...


8

I was just reading an article on Coding Horror that draws parallels between GroundHog Day and A/B Testing. But, I think the movie tells you a lot more about Learnability than A/B testing. In the movie, Bill Murray, lives the same day over and over again for a very long (debatable) time. He wakes up in the morning living the same day over and over again, with ...


8

I don't design desktop applications so I don't have much experience with options there, but I can give you some examples that might inspire. Gmail I've also always liked how Gmail does keyboard shortcuts. They're very simple, not requiring you to learn and use multiple keys at the same time and you can pop open a pane displaying all of them just by typing ...


5

Similar to your experience, I’ve found that learnability and expert efficiency are as often positively correlated as negatively correlated. As an example of positive correlation, having too many simple windows tends to hurt both: experts spend too much time navigating rather than “doing,” and novices get lost in the maze of interconnections. Often ...


4

Learning = understanding + remembering IMO when added to the usability definition, the learnability facet refers to how recurring users can get back to the UI and already know how to use it because they learned about it in the previous sessions. If so, then this could be measured by comparing performances of a first session against a later one. If you ...


4

Ideally you wouldn't need a "how it works" section at all. Using the right design cues to make it clear what you can do on the site, supported by appropriate copy, will help the user understand what the site does. Like a user manual, the "how this site works" section will be the last resort for most people. If you do need to have this section, keep it short ...


4

The effort you spend in coding, analyzing, prepare and filter the analytics data is huge. Why not just do an usability test for both designs with persons you can ask, instead of do unknown magic with analytic numbers. Give them a predefined task first time and meet them again a week later with same task. It costs you 2x1day for 6 people (80% error ...


4

I haven't yet figured how to apply similar trick particularly to keyboard shortcuts but to me the most thrilling way of "converting" novice users from mouse to general keyboard/command-line interaction was one I've seen in some old version (13? 14?) AutoCAD. In that version, there was a large pane one could 'paint on' using mouse and menus and another, ...


2

The best I've used is cryp.sr. ALL the editing in this is done using the keyboard. So in the top bar there is just one '?' symbol which lists all the shortcuts. This is great for shortcut obsessives like me who want to learn all the possible shortcuts - not just the obvious ones :)


2

One thing that is often stressed in education is that it's almost impossible to measure the effiencey in changes on how we teach a topic. There are to many factors that influences learning. And I think the warning is applicable here as well. Learning a new interface and learning algebra are very different things but share the same problem when we try to ...


2

That's certainly one dimension to look at, and it would be a good proxy for learnability in some situations. I think you'll have problems using it as a direct metric to compare sites however. As a separate point, some companies get hung up on the "standard" definition of usability - and start looking for metrics to track learnability, etc. over time. I ...


1

Learnability is a lot about being able to remember. So testing it would require consideration of factors such as Frequency of use So the time periods between usages are a factor. There can often be a gestalt-like situation where 'the penny drops' and users suddenly understand what the software does. Once they've 'got' the interface they tend not to ...


1

You can't expect that users know before what is a shortcode. If you never used email you don't know what cc and bcc is, but you will figure out. Shortcodes are not like a button that stands there: "click me to see what is happening". First of all, every plugin or theme developer choose the name of the shortcode. You have to read the description of that ...


1

From personal experience, we have a wordpress blog for a range of people* to contribute blog posts to. * Mainly developers, technical people, and a handful of managers. We have shortcodes to embed vimeo and a few other things, and the answer to your Q from my experience: No. They need training on how to use shortcodes. We have a wiki on how to create ...


1

Firstly - Average user - whatever is that? The definition of average user is of some debate and usually does depends on some kind of context. It's unlikely an 'average' user will manage without a handy quick reference guide around. Sure it feels technical - but 'how' technical? Ask your users.


1

Interfaces for the real experts tend to strip away all the niceties, so you get command line interfaces with say UNIX... And the interface on a Forumla 1 car looks rather different from a normal car: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XbFR6ag-tJM


1

Ideally, products would have no learning curve: users would walk up to them for the very first time and achieve instant mastery. In practice, all applications and services, no matter how simple, will display a learning curve. source: http://www.asktog.com/basics/firstPrinciples.html#learnability Free PDF: Usability or Learnability: What are ...



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