Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

17

Personally speaking, lean UX is not a type of UX strategy, it is more like the business strategy which accommodates the fundamental UX principles. In UX Design you Design -> Prototype -> Validate as is, but when you do this in sync with other development units in the organization, it becomes lean UX. Anyways, here are some of the links/books/what-have-you. ...


14

To be a good User Experience Designer, you have to understand the customer, the user and the problem. The key is to solve the problem by the help of design. You have to understand the various aspects of User Experience design and find a niche and complement it with other skills. Broadly UX can be categorized into User Research - This is one of the key part ...


12

Although I am a staunch supporter of agile and lean methodologies in UX, it's important to remember that they are just methodologies. UX is not about how you create a great user experience, rather it is about what the user experience is. So there are many different UX methodologies that can achieve good results. Often one methodology is more suited to a ...


11

I would strongly recommend reading this excellent article on smashing magazine on Lean UX,to paraphrase the article: Lean UX is the practice of bringing the true nature of our work to light faster, with less emphasis on deliverables and greater focus on the actual experience being designed. Traditional documents are discarded or, at the very least, ...


11

UX, along with all of the other disciplines involved in your project, should be involved from day one. The team should strive to work in parallel with each other as much as possible. To achieve this, it is imperative that the UX resource(s) participate in all daily Agile rituals and meetings. This is especially true for backlog grooming and prioritization. ...


11

My response may be biased because I run a pure UX research, strategy and design firm, but as UX practitioners, we're involved in agile projects at the very beginning. As zsiberian stated, getting ahead of development by 1-2 sprints is the only way to keep the process agile. UX involvement in the iteration planning session allows the user story definition ...


8

Agile seems to come in a variety of flavors, but the theory is all the same, and based on that theory, UX is part of the mix from day 1...as is business line owners, customers, IT, marketing, etc. I usually find the problem is when UX is still doing waterfall but dev is trying to go AGILE. Lots of UX teams still want to pump out piles of wireframes, which ...


7

I think there needs to be more clarification on this concept in general. Even reading some of the comments so far I’m getting confused when UX within Agile is equated with Lean UX. There's a gap there that isn't really addressed in most content on the subject. And I imagine that's just because it's a challenge in general for which I'm not sure there's a ...


5

From my own experience I would say you work in a parallel stream ahead and after Development and if you take it literally not in Agile Development at all. Why? Because in my understanding Scrum, which we do at my company, is about production and development in iterations. But tasks itself not. You take a single task and work on it until its finished. Then ...


4

An approach which I find very fitting on where the UX role should intervene in Agile (Scrum in this case) development is: In the product backlog, translating end-user feedback into specifications. In the sprint planning meeting, providing mockups so both the Team and Product Owner have a better idea of what will be built and how. At the end of each ...


4

This all depends on what your definition of UX is... which has been a changing beast over the years - from what the experiences is through to a job description for certain kinds of role. I would personally say that you do need the qualifiers - since you can apply UX practices in many different contexts. For example: A dedicated UX agency brought in to do ...


4

I agree with @jonw's comment above, that ideally you would re-design your content from scratch. If for whatever reason management won't wait that long (still do try to persuade them to redo sometime your content for mobile please!), then I have found the most honest approach and the one which will not break UX fundamentally the following: Break the site ...


3

Custom is a type of plan, right? Then it should be another plan select button, like so: The Custom Plan link takes you to a plan customization page. Alternately, you could do a tab-style jQuery slidedown, whereby clicking Custom Plan reveals the customization interface, like so:


3

I would say that it depends on what you are showing on the loading animation : if you just want to show that something is loading without any duration information, a clockwise will tell the user he just have to wait. but if you actually display an information about how long the loading will last (much better) you can use 1 round of counter-clockwise like ...


2

online Wiki with the spec Look into using a 'component library'. They take time to set up initially, but can streamline projects down the road. The idea is to document individual elements. For instance, you may have a design pattern for a search field. You'd describe this pattern in the component library, add some visuals, and, ideally, maybe even have ...


2

If you're using Axure, then you already have access to publish to Axure Share. The annotations and notes are still readily available on the page and anyone can access it at any time. When you update the wires and republish, it uses the same url - so it a bit like a living document. I use this all the time and it's incredibly useful for sharing ideas/specs ...


2

For the "Lean" part of this: dividing the design documentation into: Style Guide - Always up to date Individual Designs - Not kept up to date after they have served their purpose. Wiki or Confluence is great for documentation since you can link from the designs to the Style Guide (and also in the case of using Confluence and Jira, link development ...


2

A massive part of User Experience is understanding your customer. Know why a customer is coming to your site, what type of customer they are, and what they want to do. Imagine you were in Car Sales. If you had a customer walk through the door... you knew what they wanted to spend, their specific wants, what is important to them, what wasn't, and how they ...


2

Before I churn through these questions one-by-one, this isn't really the "type" of question, as it's very vague. Any number of answers, all mostly opinion-based, could suffice. I'll lay our some generic ones here that answer your questions, though. Step 1: Get end goals in mind that the website must achieve. How can I do this? - You say you have a ...


2

What my suggestion is would be to use paper as draft for ideas, and transfer them to digital. I think the programs for doing wireframes and mockups already allow you to do some type of manual versioning (because it is hard to do visual comparisons meaningfully for the computer). You just have to work out a good system where the branch points are, or keep ...


1

Short answer: You can not Lean without having a really integrated team. Lean UX origins comes from Lean Strategy. It is a bit strange that you already have a brand new UX team already integrated to your organization. Lean Strategy generally is favor of; Low inventory and personal cost High communication with customer Really short cycles and more on ...


1

User Experience is not related to design, Its a study related to research, understand the user, do analysis to understand your user's need. You are creating websites for users and not for you. So know your user well before start the design. UX has a process to follow. Studying those process and adhere it on your project is important. If the website does ...


1

Information analytic skills Information analytic skills is a must have! You have be able to analyze the content and determine what information is 1st priority (what did the user came here to see or to do), 2nd priority (what must be available) and what is absolutely not important. Graphic design skills You need to have a great understanding of web ...


1

Lean or Agile are only methodologies of applying a discipline, be it software development or UX design. The arrangement between the UX specialist and the dev team (external consultant, internal full time, etc...) determines heavily what methodology would be used. E.g., if you're not an integral part of the development organization, then Lean UX can be ...


1

In my experience agile development can be antagonistic towards UX, especially if UX is attempted to be made to fit within an agile development frame work. The issues with agile don't relate to how successful then can be for development teams but when either UX concepting is attempted within sprints or if key design is done on the fly with the development ...


1

"create PDF that we print for the developers..." Why would one use Axure then? This is like using a machine gun to kill ants. Axure is good for demonstrating interactions which can't be achieved with a PDF or print. When looking at how developers work it becomes clear that there is so much more than just drawing the UI, at least if it's not a ...


1

A recent trial project I've been working on I've been created mid level fidelity prototypes using Axure and then sharing via Axshare. This has allowed me to get quite far into the specification without need much written down. This is helped by daily stand ups. Then, when we get nearer the end, I get the designs created (in PSDs, not ideal but that's the way ...


1

Ideally it needs to start as early as the final stages of the opportunity pursuit when the UX lead is invited to the closing meetings with the potential client and has reviewed the SOW. That does two important things: gives you voice in conversations about scope, which in tern gives you heads up about project and what it's going to take. Christie - I know ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible